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Difference between revisions of "Counties in Wisconsin"

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Revision as of 11:41, 30 July 2013

Wisconsin has 72 counties. Counties in Wisconsin (Sunshine Review) are governed with the board of supervisors (Sunshine Review) model with two exceptions: Milwaukee County which could elect supervisors from Assembly districts until 1980, and Menominee County which follows the boundaries of the Menominee Indian reservation and governs using the town board model. [1]

County history

The first three counties in Wisconsin were formed in 1818: Brown County in the east, Crawford County in the west and (now defunct) Michilimackinac in the north. As the population increased, Iowa County was added in the southeast in 1829 and Milwaukee County was added in 1834. In 1836 the Wisconsin Territory was created which led to the formation of 15 new counties within the territory: Calumet, Dane, Dodge, Fond du Lac, Grant, Green, Jefferson, Manitowac, Marquette, Portage, Racine, Rock, Sheboygan, Walworth and Washington.

Sauk, St Croix and Winnebago counties were formed in 1840; Richland in 1842; Bayfield and Chippewa in 1845. In 1846 Columbia, Lafayette and Waukesha counties were organized, Adams in 1848 (the year Wisconsin was admitted to the union as a state), and Kenosha and Marathon in 1850. Door, La Crosse, Oconto, Outagamie, Vernon, Waupaca and Waushara were all organized in 1851, and Kewaunee in 1852. Buffalo, Clark, Jackson, Ozaukee, Pierce, Polk and Shawano were organized in 1853, while Douglas, Dunn, Monroe and Trempealeau entered in 1854. Burnett, Eau Claire, Juneau and Wood formed in 1856. Green Lake and Pepin counties formed in 1858, Barron in 1859. Ashland County was established in 1860, Lincoln in 1874, Taylor in 1875, Langlade, Marinette and Price all in 1879. Florence County was established in 1882, Sawyer and Washburn in 1883, Forest and Oneida in 1885. In 1893 Iron and Vilas counties were formed, and Rusk County was established in 1901.

Wisconsin's 72nd (and so far, final) county was formed in 1961 when the reservation of the Menominee Indians was recognized as a county. [2] [3]

County website evaluations

Wisconsin counties
Main article: Evaluation of Wisconsin county websites
  • 39 Wisconsin counties put their budget on their website.
  • 51 counties include information on their websites about public government meetings.
  • 62 include information about the county's elected officials.
  • 63 include information about the county's administrative officials.
  • 44 give information about permits and zoning in the county.
  • 18 of the counties put information on their websites about audits that the county government has had performed.
  • 2 counties provide information about its contracts with county vendors.
  • None of the county websites disclose whether or not they belong to any government sector lobbying associations.
  • 4 county websites provide information on how to request public records using the Wisconsin Open Records Law.
  • 5 county websites provide some information about county taxes.

Counties without websites

As of early March 2009, two of Wisconsin's 72 counties had no website.

List of counties

Adams-Crawford

Dane-Forest

Grant-Jackson

Kenosha-Monroe

Oconto-Racine

Sauk-Vilas

Walworth-Wood

See also

External links

  1. WI County Association Brochure on County Government
  2. WI County Association Brochure on County Government
  3. Wisconsin Counties, NACO

This article was taken and modified from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia under the GNU license.