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Difference between revisions of "Curtis Bostic"

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Bostic ran for the [[U.S. House of Representatives|U.S. House]] representing [[South Carolina's 1st Congressional District special election, 2013|the 1st Congressional District]] of [[South Carolina]]. The election was held to replace [[Tim Scott]], who was appointed to fill [[Jim DeMint|Jim DeMint's]] vacant seat in the [[United States Senate|U.S. Senate]].<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2012/12/17/scotts-departure-for-senate-will-trigger-third-special-house-election-in-2013/ ''Washington Post'' "Scott's departure for Senate will trigger third special House election in 2013," December 17, 2012]</ref> Bostic ran in the Republican primary against [[Keith Blandford]], [[Ric Bryant]], [[Larry Grooms]], [[Jonathan Hoffman]], [[Jeff King (South Carolina)|Jeff King]], [[John Kuhn]], [[Tim Larkin]], [[Chip Limehouse]], [[Peter McCoy]], [[Elizabeth Moffly]], [[Ray Nash]], [[Andy Patrick]], [[Shawn Pinkston]], [[Mark Sanford]] and [[Teddy Turner]] on March 19, 2013.<ref name="scrn"/> He was defeated by [[Mark Sanford]] in the runoff primary on April 2, 2013.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/2013-election/results/house/runoff/south-carolina/ ''Politico'' "South Carolina Runoff" Accessed April 2, 2013]</ref> The general election takes place on May 7, 2013.<ref>[http://www.scgop.com/2013/01/02/1st-congressional-special-election-details-set/# ''South Carolina Republican Party Website'' "1st Congressional Special Election details set," accessed January 3, 2013]</ref>
 
Bostic ran for the [[U.S. House of Representatives|U.S. House]] representing [[South Carolina's 1st Congressional District special election, 2013|the 1st Congressional District]] of [[South Carolina]]. The election was held to replace [[Tim Scott]], who was appointed to fill [[Jim DeMint|Jim DeMint's]] vacant seat in the [[United States Senate|U.S. Senate]].<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2012/12/17/scotts-departure-for-senate-will-trigger-third-special-house-election-in-2013/ ''Washington Post'' "Scott's departure for Senate will trigger third special House election in 2013," December 17, 2012]</ref> Bostic ran in the Republican primary against [[Keith Blandford]], [[Ric Bryant]], [[Larry Grooms]], [[Jonathan Hoffman]], [[Jeff King (South Carolina)|Jeff King]], [[John Kuhn]], [[Tim Larkin]], [[Chip Limehouse]], [[Peter McCoy]], [[Elizabeth Moffly]], [[Ray Nash]], [[Andy Patrick]], [[Shawn Pinkston]], [[Mark Sanford]] and [[Teddy Turner]] on March 19, 2013.<ref name="scrn"/> He was defeated by [[Mark Sanford]] in the runoff primary on April 2, 2013.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/2013-election/results/house/runoff/south-carolina/ ''Politico'' "South Carolina Runoff" Accessed April 2, 2013]</ref> The general election takes place on May 7, 2013.<ref>[http://www.scgop.com/2013/01/02/1st-congressional-special-election-details-set/# ''South Carolina Republican Party Website'' "1st Congressional Special Election details set," accessed January 3, 2013]</ref>
  
Former [[Governor of South Carolina|South Carolina Governor]] [[Mark Sanford]] (R) continued his attempt to re-enter public service, advancing to the April 2 Republican Primary runoff in the [[South Carolina's 1st Congressional District special election, 2013|1st congressional district special election]]. Sanford faced Bostic, defeating him in the April 2 primary runoff. [[Elizabeth Colbert-Busch]] (D) easily won the Democratic primary, but Sanford defeated her in the general election on May 7, 2013.
+
Former [[Governor of South Carolina|South Carolina Governor]] [[Mark Sanford]] (R) continued his attempt to re-enter public service, advancing to the April 2 Republican Primary runoff in the [[South Carolina's 1st Congressional District special election, 2013|1st Congressional District special election]]. Sanford faced Bostic, defeating him in the April 2 primary runoff. [[Elizabeth Colbert-Busch]] (D) easily won the Democratic primary, but Sanford defeated her in the general election on May 7, 2013.
  
 
Observers considered former Governor [[Mark Sanford|Sanford]] the front runner due to name recognition. Sanford had previously served as [[Governor of South Carolina]], and he held this seat in the [[U.S. House of Representatives]] for three terms. He also had a financial advantage due to his fundraising network and $120,000 he held in an account from a previous campaign.<ref>[http://www.rollcall.com/news/sanford_likely_front_runner_in_sc_special_election-220542-1.html ''Roll Call'' "Sanford Likely Front-Runner in S.C. Special Election," January 3, 2013]</ref> The district leans Republican.<ref>[http://www.salon.com/2013/01/23/ted_turners_son_vying_in_sc_congressional_primary/ ''Salon.com'' "Ted Turner’s son vying in SC congressional primary," January 23, 2013]</ref> The last Democratic candidate elected was Mendel Jackson Davis in 1978.<ref>[http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=D000125 ''Biographical Directory of the United States Congress'' "Davis, Medel Jackson, (1942-2007)," accessed January 28, 2013]</ref>
 
Observers considered former Governor [[Mark Sanford|Sanford]] the front runner due to name recognition. Sanford had previously served as [[Governor of South Carolina]], and he held this seat in the [[U.S. House of Representatives]] for three terms. He also had a financial advantage due to his fundraising network and $120,000 he held in an account from a previous campaign.<ref>[http://www.rollcall.com/news/sanford_likely_front_runner_in_sc_special_election-220542-1.html ''Roll Call'' "Sanford Likely Front-Runner in S.C. Special Election," January 3, 2013]</ref> The district leans Republican.<ref>[http://www.salon.com/2013/01/23/ted_turners_son_vying_in_sc_congressional_primary/ ''Salon.com'' "Ted Turner’s son vying in SC congressional primary," January 23, 2013]</ref> The last Democratic candidate elected was Mendel Jackson Davis in 1978.<ref>[http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=D000125 ''Biographical Directory of the United States Congress'' "Davis, Medel Jackson, (1942-2007)," accessed January 28, 2013]</ref>

Revision as of 15:35, 19 December 2013

Curtis Bostic
Curtis Bostic.jpg
Candidate for
U.S. House, South Carolina, District 1
PartyRepublican
Military service
Service/branchUnited States Marine Corps
Personal
ProfessionAttorney
Websites
Campaign website
Curtis Bostic was a 2013 Republican candidate seeking election to the U.S. House in the special election for the 1st Congressional District of South Carolina.[1]

Mark Sanford defeated Bostic in the April 2 Republican runoff primary.[2]

Biography

Bostic has worked as an attorney for more than 20 years.[3] He previously served in the United States Marine Corps.[3]

Bostic served two terms on the Charleston County Council.[3]

Issues

Campaign themes

2013

Bostic's main campaign theme centered around spending cuts. He had ten other issues listed on his campaign website. They included:[4]

  • Pro Spending Cuts: Excerpt: "Our nation does NOT have a taxing problem, it clearly has a spending problem. Taxes cannot be raised high enough to cure our budget deficit; there simply isn’t that much money available. Rather than continue to increase taxes and place further chains on economic recovery, the tax code needs to be modified into a system that is fair for all Americans and produces real growth."
  • Pro Job Creation and Economic Growth: "Capitalism has brought more prosperity and freedom to the world than any other system. However, our federal government has made it increasingly difficult for free enterprise to work. Excessive regulation and taxation inhibit economic growth. More government is not the solution to economic troubles."
  • Pro Limited, Constitutional Form of Government: Excerpt: "The Constitution is my guide for everything from the role of government to evaluating proposed legislation. The very first qualification for anyone running for the United States Congress (House or Senate) must be a command understanding of the United States Constitution and the basics of how to determine the Original Intent of the Framers. As a United States Congressman, I will obey my oath to the Constitution."
  • Pro Life: "I am staunchly and unapologetically committed to defending the most defenseless among us, the unborn child. I believe both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution clearly give the federal government the authority and duty to protect the rights of the unborn child."
  • Pro Traditional Marriage: Excerpt: "I also believe that the definition of marriage consisting of a covenant between a man and a woman must be upheld. Redefining marriage outside of those terms would cause it to be something else and weaken the institution."
  • Pro Israel: Excerpt: "In an increasingly hostile world, America needs all the friends we can gather. In the Mideast, Israel is a friend and ally, and I will continue support for Israel’s sovereignty and survival."
  • Pro Gun Rights: "I am a firm supporter of the firearm ownership rights of law-abiding citizens. The Second Amendment clearly is an individual right and has nothing to do with the collective rights of any group. It also says nothing about hunting or sporting purposes. The founders understood that an armed citizenry was the last defense against tyranny."
  • Pro Domestic Energy: "The United States needs to decrease its dependence on foreign energy sources. This means research into viable alternative energy sources, facilitating the construction of state-of-the-art nuclear power plants, and expanding domestic production of oil and natural gas. Developing domestic energy resources would also have the effect of adding thousands of jobs to our economy."
  • Pro 10th Amendment:" The Tenth Amendment of the Constitution states, “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” My position is that of the framers, who made it very clear that any power not specifically granted to the federal government belongs to the individual states. For example, functions such as education should be handled at the state level, since the federal government has no Constitutional authority over this area. I cannot emphasize this strongly enough. I believe that the federal government should be small and limited."
  • Pro Parents’ Rights to Direct Education: Excerpt: "I want you to know that as your Congressman I will fight to protect and advance the Constitutional rights of parents to direct the education of their children and will fight to help oppose attempts like this to undermine those rights in the state of South Carolina."
  • Pro Religious Liberty: "The First Amendment protects all Americans equally. All are free to worship, or not, as guided by their conscience. Too many however have misconstrued freedom of religion into freedom from religion. The Constitution prohibits the establishment of a state or national religion; it does not preclude recognition of a common faith shared by the majority of Americans."

Residency controversy

Bostic drew some attention after reports circulated that he lives outside the 1st District he seeks to represent, which is permitted under South Carolina election law.[5]

Elections

2013

See also: South Carolina's 1st Congressional District special election, 2013

Bostic ran for the U.S. House representing the 1st Congressional District of South Carolina. The election was held to replace Tim Scott, who was appointed to fill Jim DeMint's vacant seat in the U.S. Senate.[6] Bostic ran in the Republican primary against Keith Blandford, Ric Bryant, Larry Grooms, Jonathan Hoffman, Jeff King, John Kuhn, Tim Larkin, Chip Limehouse, Peter McCoy, Elizabeth Moffly, Ray Nash, Andy Patrick, Shawn Pinkston, Mark Sanford and Teddy Turner on March 19, 2013.[1] He was defeated by Mark Sanford in the runoff primary on April 2, 2013.[7] The general election takes place on May 7, 2013.[8]

Former South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford (R) continued his attempt to re-enter public service, advancing to the April 2 Republican Primary runoff in the 1st Congressional District special election. Sanford faced Bostic, defeating him in the April 2 primary runoff. Elizabeth Colbert-Busch (D) easily won the Democratic primary, but Sanford defeated her in the general election on May 7, 2013.

Observers considered former Governor Sanford the front runner due to name recognition. Sanford had previously served as Governor of South Carolina, and he held this seat in the U.S. House of Representatives for three terms. He also had a financial advantage due to his fundraising network and $120,000 he held in an account from a previous campaign.[9] The district leans Republican.[10] The last Democratic candidate elected was Mendel Jackson Davis in 1978.[11]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 1 Special Republican Primary, 2013
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngMark Sanford 36.9% 19,854
Green check mark transparent.pngCurtis Bostic 13.3% 7,168
Ric Bryant 0.2% 87
Larry Grooms 12.4% 6,673
Jonathan Hoffman 0.7% 360
Jeff King 0.4% 211
John Kuhn 6.5% 3,479
Tim Larkin 0.7% 393
Harry "Chip" Limehouse 6.1% 3,279
Peter McCoy 1.6% 867
Elizabeth Moffly 1% 530
Ray Nash 4.7% 2,508
Andy Patrick 7% 3,783
Shawn Pinkston 0.3% 154
Keith Blandford 0.4% 195
Teddy Turner 7.9% 4,252
Total Votes 53,793
Source: Official results via South Carolina State Election Commission[12]
U.S. House, South Carolina District 1 Special Runoff Republican Primary, 2013
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngMark Sanford 56.6% 26,127
Curtis Bostic 43.4% 20,044
Total Votes 46,171
Source: Official results via South Carolina State Election Commission[13]

Endorsements

Former South Carolina state senator John Kuhn announced after the primary on March 19th that he planned to endorse Bostic in the April 2 runoff election against Sanford for the Republican nomination.[14] Kuhn, who finished sixth in a field of 16 contenders, said he’d work hard to help Bostic win.[14] “I think that Curtis Bostic is a great guy. He's honest, he's honorable and he's hard-working, a strict constitutionalist. I got to know him on the campaign trail and like him a lot. I'm definitely throwing my support behind Curtis Bostic."[14]

Campaign donors

2013

Sanford outraised his GOP runoff opponent by more than fifteen-to-one during the pre-runoff period, which ran from February 28 to March 13, ending six days before the primary, in which Bostic finished a surprising second in the sixteen-candidate field.[15]

Sanford raised $78,521 in the two-week pre-runoff period and ended with $271,765 in the bank, while Bostic reported a mere $5,205 haul and loaned his own campaign another $50,000. Bostic loaned his campaign $150,000, and he finished the period with $56,542 on hand.[15]

Since the surprising primary finish, in which the former Charleston city council member became Sanford's main competition, some are indicating that they expect Bostic's fundraising to surge.[15] Since the primary, Bostic's campaign has reported a total raised of just $3,500.[15] Sanford has not yet filed any reports showing money raised after the primary.[15]

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