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{{Stategov}}{{TOCnestright}}'''The Delaware General Assembly''' is the [[state legislature]] of [[Delaware]]. It is composed of the [[Delaware State Senate]] with 21 Senators and the [[Delaware House of Representatives]] with 41 Representatives. It meets at the Legislative Hall in Dover, convening on the second Tuesday of January of odd numbered years, with a second session of the same Assembly convening likewise in even numbered years. Normally the sessions are required to adjourn by the last day of June of the same calendar year.  In 2010, the General Assembly was [[Dates of 2010 state legislative sessions| in session]] from January 12th to June 30th.<ref>[http://legis.delaware.gov/legislature.nsf/Lookup/faq?open 2010 session dates for Delaware legislature]</ref>
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{{Chambers infobox
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|Partisan = Democrat
 +
|Chamber = Delaware General Assembly
 +
|Seal = Seal of Delaware.svg.png
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<!--Level 2-->
 +
|Type = [[State legislature]]
 +
|Term limit = [[State legislatures with term limits|None]]
 +
|Next session = [[Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions|January 8, 2013]]
 +
|Website = [http://legis.delaware.gov/ Official Legislature Page]
 +
<!--Level 3-->
 +
|Senate president = [[Patricia Blevins]] (D)
 +
|House speaker = [[Peter Schwartzkopf]] (D)
 +
|Majority leader = [[David McBride]] (D) ([[Delaware State Senate|Senate]]),<br>[[Valerie Longhurst]] (D) ([[Delaware House of Representatives|House]])
 +
|Minority leader = [[F. Gary Simpson]] (R) ([[Delaware State Senate|Senate]]),<br>[[Daniel Short]] (R) ([[Delaware House of Representatives|House]])
 +
<!-- Level 4-->
 +
|Members = 21 ([[Delaware State Senate|Senate]]), 41 ([[Delaware House of Representatives|House]])
 +
|Term length = [[Length of terms of state senators|4 years (Senate)]], [[Length of terms of state representatives|2 years (House)]]
 +
|Authority = [[Article II, Delaware Constitution#Section 1|Art II, Section 1, Delaware Constitution]]
 +
|Salary = [[Comparison of state legislative salaries|$41,680/year]] + $7,334 expenses/year
 +
<!-- Level 5-->
 +
|Next election = November 4, 2014
 +
|Last election = November 6, 2012 <br>[[Delaware State Senate elections, 2012|21 seats (Senate)]]<br> [[Delaware House of Representatives elections, 2012|41 seats (House)]]
 +
|Redistricting = [[Redistricting in Delaware|Delaware Legislature has control]]
 +
}}{{TOCnestright}}'''The Delaware General Assembly''' is the [[state legislature]] of [[Delaware]]. It is composed of the [[Delaware State Senate]] with 21 Senators and the [[Delaware House of Representatives]] with 41 Representatives. It meets at the Legislative Hall in Dover, convening on the second Tuesday of January of odd numbered years, with a second session of the same Assembly convening likewise in even numbered years. Normally the sessions are required to adjourn by the last day of June of the same calendar year.  In 2012, the General Assembly was [[Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions|in session]] from January 10 through June 30.
  
Members are elected from single member districts, all apportioned to roughly equal populations after each U.S. census. Elections are held the first Tuesday after November 1st and about one half of the Senate is elected every two years for a four year term, and the entire House of Represenatives is elected every two years for a two year term. Vacancies are filled through special elections.
+
Members are elected from single member districts, all apportioned to roughly equal populations after each U.S. census. Elections are held the first Tuesday after November 1st and about one half of the Senate is elected every two years for a four year term, and the entire House of Representatives is elected every two years for a two year term. Vacancies are filled through special elections.
  
 +
{{State trifecta status|state=Delaware|control=Democratic}}
 
==Sessions==
 
==Sessions==
 
[[Article II, Delaware Constitution | Article II of the Delaware Constitution]] establishes when the General Assembly is to be in session.  Section 4 of Article II states that the General Assembly is to convene on the second Tuesday of January of each calendar year, and it is not to extend beyond the last day of June.
 
[[Article II, Delaware Constitution | Article II of the Delaware Constitution]] establishes when the General Assembly is to be in session.  Section 4 of Article II states that the General Assembly is to convene on the second Tuesday of January of each calendar year, and it is not to extend beyond the last day of June.
  
 
Section 4 also allows the General Assembly to be convened into special session by the [[Governor of Delaware]] or by the mutual call of the presiding officers of both Houses.
 
Section 4 also allows the General Assembly to be convened into special session by the [[Governor of Delaware]] or by the mutual call of the presiding officers of both Houses.
 +
 +
===2014===
 +
::''See also: [[Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions]]''
 +
 +
In 2014, the Legislature is projected to be in session from January 14 through June 30.
 +
 +
===2013===
 +
::''See also: [[Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions]]''
 +
In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 8 to July 1.
 +
 +
====Major issues====
 +
Major issues in the 2013 legislative session included gun control, gay marriage, and budgetary problems.<ref>[http://www.beaumontenterprise.com/news/crime/article/Budget-guns-among-issues-facing-Del-lawmakers-4173695.php ''Beaumont Enterprise,'' "Budget, guns among issues facing Del. lawmakers," January 8, 2013]</ref>
 +
 +
===2012===
 +
::''See also: [[Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions]]''
 +
In 2012, the General Assembly was in session from January 10 through June 30.
 +
====Major issues====
 +
Legislators focused more on economic rather than social issues this session, including reforms to Medicaid and addressing the budget deficit.<ref>[http://www.delawarefirst.org/21514-legislators-2012-agenda ''Delaware First Media,'' "Legislators begin to form 2012 agenda," January 8, 2012]</ref>
  
 
===2011===
 
===2011===
 
::''See also: [[Dates of 2011 state legislative sessions]]''
 
::''See also: [[Dates of 2011 state legislative sessions]]''
In 2011, the General Assembly will be in session from January 11 through June 30.
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In 2011, the General Assembly was in session from January 11 through June 30.
 +
 
 +
====Session highlights====
 +
=====State employee benefit cuts=====
 +
[[Governor of Delaware|Governor]] [[Jack Markell|Jack Markell's]] plan to cut public employee pension and health benefits received overwhelming support from officials within his administration, legislators and even public employee union officials. Markell's proposal, which became law on May 2, 2011, requires new state employees to pay 5% of their salary after the first $6,000 towards their pension, rather than 3%. It also eliminates the use of overtime when calculating pensions and the "double state share" health care benefit. According to the governor's office, the plan will save Delaware taxpayers $130 million over the next five years and $480 million over the next fifteen.<ref>[http://governor.delaware.gov/news/2011/1104april/20110414-reform.shtml ''Office of the Governor of Delaware'', "Markell Thanks Legislature for Overwhelming Votes of Support for Employee Pension and Health Care Reform – Changes Will Save Taxpayers over $480M over 15 years," April 14, 2011.]</ref><ref>[http://www.stateline.org/live/details/story?contentId=582585 ''Stateline'', "States overhaul pensions but pass on 401(k)-style plans," June 21, 2011.]</ref>
  
 
===2010===
 
===2010===
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In 2010, the General Assembly was in session from January 12th to June 30th.
 
In 2010, the General Assembly was in session from January 12th to June 30th.
  
== History ==
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==Ethics and transparency==
 +
===Open States Transparency===
 +
{{Transparency card|State=Delaware|Grade=C}}
 +
 
 +
==History==
 
The Delaware General Assembly was one of the thirteen legislatures that participated in the American War of Independence. Created by the [[Delaware Constitution]] of 1776, its membership and responsibilities have been modified by the Delaware Constitution of 1792, the Delaware Constitution of 1831, the Delaware Constitution of 1897, and significant [[U.S. Supreme Court]] action, effective in 1965.
 
The Delaware General Assembly was one of the thirteen legislatures that participated in the American War of Independence. Created by the [[Delaware Constitution]] of 1776, its membership and responsibilities have been modified by the Delaware Constitution of 1792, the Delaware Constitution of 1831, the Delaware Constitution of 1897, and significant [[U.S. Supreme Court]] action, effective in 1965.
  
 
Significant actions of the General Assembly include the calling of the Constitutional Convention which become the first to ratify the U.S. Constitution of 1787, and its rejection of secession from the Union on January 3, 1861 in spite of Delaware's slave state status. Also significant was its repeated refusal to legislate the end of slavery or voting rights for women, requiring federal law to enforce those changes.
 
Significant actions of the General Assembly include the calling of the Constitutional Convention which become the first to ratify the U.S. Constitution of 1787, and its rejection of secession from the Union on January 3, 1861 in spite of Delaware's slave state status. Also significant was its repeated refusal to legislate the end of slavery or voting rights for women, requiring federal law to enforce those changes.
  
Until 1898 the General Assembly was apportioned by county, with a total of 30 members elected county-wide "at-large" with equal numbers from each of the three counties. After 1898 the total membership was increased to 52 and they were elected from districts, mostly corresponding to the geographical boundaries of hundreds within the counties. However, there was little recognition of disparities in population, except for the addition of two extra senators and five extra representatives elected from much more populous New Castle County. After 1965, action of [[U.S. Supreme Court]] forced the General Assembly to redistrict so that all members of both houses were elected from districts of equal population. By 1972, the total membership had increased to its present 62, still the second smallest [[state legislature]] in the country.  
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Until 1898 the General Assembly was apportioned by county, with a total of 30 members elected county-wide "at-large" with equal numbers from each of the three counties. After 1898 the total membership was increased to 52 and they were elected from districts, mostly corresponding to the geographical boundaries of hundreds within the counties. However, there was little recognition of disparities in population, except for the addition of two extra senators and five extra representatives elected from much more populous New Castle County. After 1965, action of [[U.S. Supreme Court]] forced the General Assembly to redistrict so that all members of both houses were elected from districts of equal population. By 1972, the total membership had increased to its present 62, still the second smallest [[state legislature]] in the country.
  
==Legislators==
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===Partisan balance 1992-2013===
 +
{{who runs badge|align=left}}
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::''See also: [[Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States]] and [[Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States, Delaware]]''
 +
[[File:Delaware legislature pie chart 1992-2013.png|thumb|Partisan breakdown of the Delaware legislature from 1992-2013]]
 +
'''Delaware State Senate:'''
 +
Throughout every year from 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the Delaware State Senate. The Delaware State Senate is 1 of 16 state senates that was Democratic for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. During the final five years of the study, Delaware was under Democratic [[trifectas]].
  
===Salaries===
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Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.
  
:: ''See also: [[Comparison of state legislative salaries]]''
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'''Delaware State House of Representatives:'''
 +
From 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the Delaware State House of Representatives for five years and the Republicans for 17 years. During the final five years of the study, Delaware was under Democratic [[trifectas]].
  
As of 2010, members of the Delaware legislature are paid $41,680 per year. Legislators are allowed a maximum of $7,334 in expenses annually.<ref>[http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=20117 ''National Conference of State Legislatures'', "2010 Legislator Compensation Data"]</ref>
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Across the country, there were 577 Democratic and 483 Republican State Houses of Representatives from 1992 to 2013.
  
The $41,680 that Delaware legislators are paid as of 2010 is a decrease from the $42,000 that they were paid during legislative sessions in 2007. Delaware legislators received no per diem in 2007.<ref>[http://www.empirecenter.org/html/legislative_salaries.cfm ''Empire Center'', "Legislative Salaries Per State as of 2007"]</ref>
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Over the course of the 22-year study, state governments became increasingly more partisan. At the outset of the study period (1992), 18 of the 49 states with partisan legislatures had single-party trifectas and 31 states had divided governments. In 2013, only 13 states have divided governments, while single-party trifectas held sway in 36 states, the most in the 22 years studied.
  
===When sworn in===
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The chart below shows the partisan composition of the [[Governor of Delaware|Office of the Governor of Delaware]], the [[Delaware State Senate]] and the [[Delaware House of Representatives]] from 1992-2013.
 +
[[File:Partisan composition of Delaware state government(1992-2013).PNG]]
 +
====SQLI and partisanship====
 +
The chart below depicts the partisanship of the Delaware state government and the state's SQLI ranking for the years studied. For the SQLI, the states were ranked from 1-50, with 1 being the best and 50 the worst. For twelve out of the twenty years observed during the study, Delaware ranked in the top-10 of the SQLI ranking. The state dropped out of the top-10 for a period between 1996 and 1999, hitting the rank of 16th before climbing back into the top-10 for eight more years. It again dropped out of the top-10 in 2008 and has remained out of the top rankings since then. Delaware has never had a Republican trifecta, but has had a Democratic trifecta since 2009. In the state’s longest period of divided government, there was a Democratic governor, a Democratic state senate and a Republican state house. Delaware achieved its highest SQLI ranking (3rd) in 2003 and 2004 under divided government, and its lowest ranking (20th) in 2012 under a Democratic trifecta.
 +
*SQLI average with Democratic trifecta: 16.75
 +
*SQLI average with Republican trifecta: N/A
 +
*SQLI average with divided government: 7.94
 +
[[File:Delaware SQLI visualization.PNG|thumb|center|1000px|Chart displaying the partisanship of Delaware government from 1992-2013 and the State Quality of Life Index (SQLI).]]
  
 +
==Legislators==
 +
===Salaries===
 +
:: ''See also: [[Comparison of state legislative salaries]]''
 +
 +
As of 2013, members of the Delaware legislature are paid $42,750 per year. Legislators are allowed a maximum of $7,334 in expenses annually.<ref>[http://www.ncsl.org/legislatures-elections/legisdata/2012-ncsl-legislator-compensation-data.aspx ''NCSL.org'', "2012 State Legislator Compensation and Per Diem Table," accessed March 18, 2013]</ref>
 +
 +
===When sworn in===
 
:: ''See also: [[When state legislators assume office after a general election]]
 
:: ''See also: [[When state legislators assume office after a general election]]
  
 
Delaware legislators assume office the day after their election.
 
Delaware legislators assume office the day after their election.
 +
 +
==Redistricting==
 +
:: ''See also: [[Redistricting in Delaware]]
 +
 +
The Delaware General Assembly is responsible for redistricting.
 +
 +
===2010 census===
 +
Delaware received its 2010 census data on March 1, 2011. The state population increased by over 115,000 (nearly 15%), topping 900,000 residents.<ref>[http://www.delawareonline.com/article/20101222/NEWS02/12220353 ''Delaware Online,'' "Delaware grows 15 percent, tops 900,000," December 22, 2010]</ref> Significant population shifts threatened to radically alter state [[Delaware House of Representatives|House]] and [[Delaware State Senate|Senate]] districts.  According to the Delaware Population Consortium, there was a large shift to the southern part of the state, with Sussex County growing by 25% while New Castle County only saw 7% growth.<ref>[http://www.sussexcountian.com/newsnow/x1314137879/Redistricting-looms-in-2011-General-Assembly-session ''Sussex Countian,'' "Redistricting looms in 2011 General Assembly session," January 12, 2011]</ref>
 +
 +
With comfortable majorities in the [[Delaware State Senate|Senate]] and [[Delaware House of Representatives|House]], Democrats controlled the redistricting process, although Republicans did construct a counter-proposal to Democratic maps. The [[Delaware House of Representatives|House]] passed its redistricting map on June 28, 2011 on a party line vote. The [[Delaware State Senate|Senate]] map was approved on June 30, 2011 by a 15-6 vote. Two districts were merged in the northern part of the state in order to make room for a new southern district.<ref>[http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/0890ce4c374543b7a9c262485749b6e9/DE-XGR--Redistricting/ ''The Republic'' "Delaware lawmakers approve legislative redistricting plan for state House, Senate," June 30, 2011]</ref><ref>[http://www.delawareonline.com/article/20110701/NEWS02/107010367/General-Assembly-s-pace-picks-up-in-late-night-flurry?odyssey=tab|mostpopular|text|FRONTPAGE ''Delaware Online'' "General Assembly's pace picks up in late-night flurry," July 1, 2011]</ref>
  
 
==Senate==
 
==Senate==
The Delaware Senate is the upper house of the Delaware General Assembly. It is composed of 21 Senators, each of whom is elected to a four-year term, except when reapportionment occurs, at which time Senators may be elected to a two-year term. There is no [[term limits|limit]] to the number of terms that a Senator may serve. The Delaware Senate meet at the Legislative Hall in Dover. Each Senate member represents an average district of 37,314 people.<ref>[http://ballotpedia.org/wiki/index.php/Population_represented_by_state_legislators Population represented by state legislators]</ref>
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The Delaware Senate is the upper house of the Delaware General Assembly. It is composed of 21 Senators, each of whom is elected to a four-year term, except when reapportionment occurs, at which time Senators may be elected to a two-year term. There is no [[term limits|limit]] to the number of terms that a Senator may serve. The Delaware Senate meet at the Legislative Hall in Dover. Each member represents an average of [[Population represented by state legislators|42,759 residents]], as of the 2010 Census.<ref>[http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-01.pdf ''www.census.gov/,'' "Population in 2010 of the American states," accessed January 6, 2014]</ref> After the 2000 Census, each member represented [[Population represented by state legislators|37,314]].<ref>[http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t2/tables/tab01.pdf Population in 2000 of the American states, Accessed November 27, 2013]</ref>
  
 
In order to accommodate the 10 year cycle of reapportionment, the terms of office of the Senators are staggered so that 10 Senators are elected to terms of 2 years at the first biennial general election following reapportionment, followed by two 4 year terms. The remaining 11 Senators are elected at the biennial election for two 4 year terms, followed by a 2 year term.
 
In order to accommodate the 10 year cycle of reapportionment, the terms of office of the Senators are staggered so that 10 Senators are elected to terms of 2 years at the first biennial general election following reapportionment, followed by two 4 year terms. The remaining 11 Senators are elected at the biennial election for two 4 year terms, followed by a 2 year term.
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{{desenatepartisan}}
 
{{desenatepartisan}}
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 +
The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Delaware State Senate from 1992-2013.<br>
 +
[[File:Partisan composition of the Delaware State Senate.PNG]]
  
 
==House of Representatives==
 
==House of Representatives==
 
The Delaware House of Representatives is the [[lower house]] of the Delaware General Assembly. It is composed of 41 Representatives from an equal amount of constituencies, each of whom is elected to a two year term. The Delaware General Assembly does not have [[term limits]]. The House meets at the Delaware Legislative Hall in Dover.
 
The Delaware House of Representatives is the [[lower house]] of the Delaware General Assembly. It is composed of 41 Representatives from an equal amount of constituencies, each of whom is elected to a two year term. The Delaware General Assembly does not have [[term limits]]. The House meets at the Delaware Legislative Hall in Dover.
  
From 1776 to 1792, the chamber was known as the House of Assembly, a common name for [[lower house]]s of colonial legislatures and states under the loose Confederation. The name was changed by the state's 1792 Constitution, reflecting the new federal House of Representatives, which Delaware was the first state to approve of in ratifying the federal U.S. Constitution in 1787. The renaming began a trend that has resulted in a majority of the [[lower house]]s of U.S. state legislatures sharing the same name of the U.S. House. Each representative represent an average district of 19,112 people.<ref>[http://ballotpedia.org/wiki/index.php/Population_represented_by_state_legislators Population represented by state legislators]</ref>
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From 1776 to 1792, the chamber was known as the House of Assembly, a common name for [[lower house]]s of colonial legislatures and states under the loose Confederation. The name was changed by the state's 1792 Constitution, reflecting the new federal House of Representatives, which Delaware was the first state to approve of in ratifying the federal U.S. Constitution in 1787. The renaming began a trend that has resulted in a majority of the [[lower house]]s of U.S. state legislatures sharing the same name of the U.S. House. Each member represents an average of [[Population represented by state legislators|21,901 residents]], as of the 2010 Census.<ref>[http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-01.pdf ''www.census.gov/,'' "Population in 2010 of the American states," accessed January 6, 2014]</ref> After the 2000 Census, each member represented [[Population represented by state legislators|19,112]].<ref>[http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t2/tables/tab01.pdf Population in 2000 of the American states, Accessed November 27, 2013]</ref>
  
 
===Leadership of the House===
 
===Leadership of the House===
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Members of the House of Representatives must be citizens of the United States, have lived in Delaware for three years, been a resident of their constituent district for at least one year preceding their election and must be at least 24 years old by the time of their election.
 
Members of the House of Representatives must be citizens of the United States, have lived in Delaware for three years, been a resident of their constituent district for at least one year preceding their election and must be at least 24 years old by the time of their election.
 
{{dehousepartisan}}
 
{{dehousepartisan}}
 +
 +
The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Delaware State House of Representatives from 1992-2013.<br>
 +
[[File:Partisan composition of the Delaware State House.PNG]]
  
 
==Joint committees==
 
==Joint committees==
* [[Joint Committee on Capital Improvement, Delaware State Legislature]]
+
* [[Joint Committee on Capital Improvement, Delaware State Legislature|Joint Committee on Capital Improvement]]
* [[Joint Finance Committee, Delaware State Legislature]]
+
* [[Joint Finance Committee, Delaware State Legislature|Joint Finance Committee]]
* [[Joint Sunset Committee, Delaware State Legislature]]
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* [[Joint Sunset Committee, Delaware State Legislature|Joint Sunset Committee]]
 
+
==See also==
+
*[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delaware_General_Assembly Wikipedia: Delaware General Assembly]
+
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
 
+
* [http://legis.delaware.gov/ Delaware General Assembly]
*[http://legis.delaware.gov/ Delaware General Assembly]
+
* [http://www.govtrack.us/states/de Legislation tracking at GovTrack]
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 +
{{reflist}}
  
{{reflist}}
 
 
{{state legislatures}}
 
{{state legislatures}}
 
[[Category:Delaware]]
 
[[Category:Delaware]]
 
[[Category:State legislatures, Delaware]]
 
[[Category:State legislatures, Delaware]]
 
[[Category:Legislature]]
 
[[Category:Legislature]]

Revision as of 13:17, 6 January 2014

Delaware General Assembly

Seal of Delaware.svg.png
General Information
Type:   State legislature
Term limits:   None
2014 session start:   January 8, 2013
Website:   Official Legislature Page
Leadership
Senate President:   Patricia Blevins (D)
House Speaker:  Peter Schwartzkopf (D)
Majority Leader:   David McBride (D) (Senate),
Valerie Longhurst (D) (House)
Minority leader:   F. Gary Simpson (R) (Senate),
Daniel Short (R) (House)
Structure
Members:  21 (Senate), 41 (House)
Length of term:   4 years (Senate), 2 years (House)
Authority:   Art II, Section 1, Delaware Constitution
Salary:   $41,680/year + $7,334 expenses/year
Elections
Last Election:  November 6, 2012
21 seats (Senate)
41 seats (House)
Next election:  November 4, 2014
Redistricting:  Delaware Legislature has control
The Delaware General Assembly is the state legislature of Delaware. It is composed of the Delaware State Senate with 21 Senators and the Delaware House of Representatives with 41 Representatives. It meets at the Legislative Hall in Dover, convening on the second Tuesday of January of odd numbered years, with a second session of the same Assembly convening likewise in even numbered years. Normally the sessions are required to adjourn by the last day of June of the same calendar year. In 2012, the General Assembly was in session from January 10 through June 30.

Members are elected from single member districts, all apportioned to roughly equal populations after each U.S. census. Elections are held the first Tuesday after November 1st and about one half of the Senate is elected every two years for a four year term, and the entire House of Representatives is elected every two years for a two year term. Vacancies are filled through special elections.

As of September 2014, Delaware is one of 13 Democratic state government trifectas.

Sessions

Article II of the Delaware Constitution establishes when the General Assembly is to be in session. Section 4 of Article II states that the General Assembly is to convene on the second Tuesday of January of each calendar year, and it is not to extend beyond the last day of June.

Section 4 also allows the General Assembly to be convened into special session by the Governor of Delaware or by the mutual call of the presiding officers of both Houses.

2014

See also: Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions

In 2014, the Legislature is projected to be in session from January 14 through June 30.

2013

See also: Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions

In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 8 to July 1.

Major issues

Major issues in the 2013 legislative session included gun control, gay marriage, and budgetary problems.[1]

2012

See also: Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions

In 2012, the General Assembly was in session from January 10 through June 30.

Major issues

Legislators focused more on economic rather than social issues this session, including reforms to Medicaid and addressing the budget deficit.[2]

2011

See also: Dates of 2011 state legislative sessions

In 2011, the General Assembly was in session from January 11 through June 30.

Session highlights

State employee benefit cuts

Governor Jack Markell's plan to cut public employee pension and health benefits received overwhelming support from officials within his administration, legislators and even public employee union officials. Markell's proposal, which became law on May 2, 2011, requires new state employees to pay 5% of their salary after the first $6,000 towards their pension, rather than 3%. It also eliminates the use of overtime when calculating pensions and the "double state share" health care benefit. According to the governor's office, the plan will save Delaware taxpayers $130 million over the next five years and $480 million over the next fifteen.[3][4]

2010

See also: Dates of 2010 state legislative sessions

In 2010, the General Assembly was in session from January 12th to June 30th.

Ethics and transparency

Open States Transparency

See also: Open States' Legislative Data Report Card

The Sunlight Foundation released an "Open Legislative Data Report Card" in March 2013. Delaware was given a grade of C in the report. The report card evaluated how adequate, complete and accessible legislative data is to the general public. A total of 10 states received an A -- Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Kansas, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Washington.[5]

History

The Delaware General Assembly was one of the thirteen legislatures that participated in the American War of Independence. Created by the Delaware Constitution of 1776, its membership and responsibilities have been modified by the Delaware Constitution of 1792, the Delaware Constitution of 1831, the Delaware Constitution of 1897, and significant U.S. Supreme Court action, effective in 1965.

Significant actions of the General Assembly include the calling of the Constitutional Convention which become the first to ratify the U.S. Constitution of 1787, and its rejection of secession from the Union on January 3, 1861 in spite of Delaware's slave state status. Also significant was its repeated refusal to legislate the end of slavery or voting rights for women, requiring federal law to enforce those changes.

Until 1898 the General Assembly was apportioned by county, with a total of 30 members elected county-wide "at-large" with equal numbers from each of the three counties. After 1898 the total membership was increased to 52 and they were elected from districts, mostly corresponding to the geographical boundaries of hundreds within the counties. However, there was little recognition of disparities in population, except for the addition of two extra senators and five extra representatives elected from much more populous New Castle County. After 1965, action of U.S. Supreme Court forced the General Assembly to redistrict so that all members of both houses were elected from districts of equal population. By 1972, the total membership had increased to its present 62, still the second smallest state legislature in the country.

Partisan balance 1992-2013

Who Runs the States Project
See also: Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States and Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States, Delaware
Partisan breakdown of the Delaware legislature from 1992-2013

Delaware State Senate: Throughout every year from 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the Delaware State Senate. The Delaware State Senate is 1 of 16 state senates that was Democratic for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. During the final five years of the study, Delaware was under Democratic trifectas.

Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.

Delaware State House of Representatives: From 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the Delaware State House of Representatives for five years and the Republicans for 17 years. During the final five years of the study, Delaware was under Democratic trifectas.

Across the country, there were 577 Democratic and 483 Republican State Houses of Representatives from 1992 to 2013.

Over the course of the 22-year study, state governments became increasingly more partisan. At the outset of the study period (1992), 18 of the 49 states with partisan legislatures had single-party trifectas and 31 states had divided governments. In 2013, only 13 states have divided governments, while single-party trifectas held sway in 36 states, the most in the 22 years studied.

The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Office of the Governor of Delaware, the Delaware State Senate and the Delaware House of Representatives from 1992-2013. Partisan composition of Delaware state government(1992-2013).PNG

SQLI and partisanship

The chart below depicts the partisanship of the Delaware state government and the state's SQLI ranking for the years studied. For the SQLI, the states were ranked from 1-50, with 1 being the best and 50 the worst. For twelve out of the twenty years observed during the study, Delaware ranked in the top-10 of the SQLI ranking. The state dropped out of the top-10 for a period between 1996 and 1999, hitting the rank of 16th before climbing back into the top-10 for eight more years. It again dropped out of the top-10 in 2008 and has remained out of the top rankings since then. Delaware has never had a Republican trifecta, but has had a Democratic trifecta since 2009. In the state’s longest period of divided government, there was a Democratic governor, a Democratic state senate and a Republican state house. Delaware achieved its highest SQLI ranking (3rd) in 2003 and 2004 under divided government, and its lowest ranking (20th) in 2012 under a Democratic trifecta.

  • SQLI average with Democratic trifecta: 16.75
  • SQLI average with Republican trifecta: N/A
  • SQLI average with divided government: 7.94
Chart displaying the partisanship of Delaware government from 1992-2013 and the State Quality of Life Index (SQLI).

Legislators

Salaries

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries

As of 2013, members of the Delaware legislature are paid $42,750 per year. Legislators are allowed a maximum of $7,334 in expenses annually.[6]

When sworn in

See also: When state legislators assume office after a general election

Delaware legislators assume office the day after their election.

Redistricting

See also: Redistricting in Delaware

The Delaware General Assembly is responsible for redistricting.

2010 census

Delaware received its 2010 census data on March 1, 2011. The state population increased by over 115,000 (nearly 15%), topping 900,000 residents.[7] Significant population shifts threatened to radically alter state House and Senate districts. According to the Delaware Population Consortium, there was a large shift to the southern part of the state, with Sussex County growing by 25% while New Castle County only saw 7% growth.[8]

With comfortable majorities in the Senate and House, Democrats controlled the redistricting process, although Republicans did construct a counter-proposal to Democratic maps. The House passed its redistricting map on June 28, 2011 on a party line vote. The Senate map was approved on June 30, 2011 by a 15-6 vote. Two districts were merged in the northern part of the state in order to make room for a new southern district.[9][10]

Senate

The Delaware Senate is the upper house of the Delaware General Assembly. It is composed of 21 Senators, each of whom is elected to a four-year term, except when reapportionment occurs, at which time Senators may be elected to a two-year term. There is no limit to the number of terms that a Senator may serve. The Delaware Senate meet at the Legislative Hall in Dover. Each member represents an average of 42,759 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[11] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 37,314.[12]

In order to accommodate the 10 year cycle of reapportionment, the terms of office of the Senators are staggered so that 10 Senators are elected to terms of 2 years at the first biennial general election following reapportionment, followed by two 4 year terms. The remaining 11 Senators are elected at the biennial election for two 4 year terms, followed by a 2 year term.

Like other upper houses of state and territorial legislatures and the federal U.S. Senate, the Senate can confirm or reject gubernatorial appointments to the state cabinet, commissions, boards, or justices to the Delaware Supreme Court.

Leadership of the Senate

The Lieutenant Governor of Delaware serves as the President of the Senate, but only casts a vote if required to break a tie. In his or her absence, the President Pro Tempore presides over the Senate. The President Pro Tempore is elected by the majority party caucus followed by confirmation of the entire Senate through a Senate Resolution. The President Pro Tempore is the chief leadership position in the Senate. The other Senate leaders are elected by their respective party caucuses.

Qualifications

Senators must be citizens of the United States, have lived in Delaware for three years, and have been a resident of their respective district for at least one year preceding their election. They must also be at least 27 years old at the time of their election.

Current make-up

Party As of September 2014
     Democratic Party 13
     Republican Party 8
Total 21


The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Delaware State Senate from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the Delaware State Senate.PNG

House of Representatives

The Delaware House of Representatives is the lower house of the Delaware General Assembly. It is composed of 41 Representatives from an equal amount of constituencies, each of whom is elected to a two year term. The Delaware General Assembly does not have term limits. The House meets at the Delaware Legislative Hall in Dover.

From 1776 to 1792, the chamber was known as the House of Assembly, a common name for lower houses of colonial legislatures and states under the loose Confederation. The name was changed by the state's 1792 Constitution, reflecting the new federal House of Representatives, which Delaware was the first state to approve of in ratifying the federal U.S. Constitution in 1787. The renaming began a trend that has resulted in a majority of the lower houses of U.S. state legislatures sharing the same name of the U.S. House. Each member represents an average of 21,901 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[13] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 19,112.[14]

Leadership of the House

The Speaker of the House presides over the House of Representatives. The Speaker is elected by the majority party caucus followed by confirmation of the full House through the passage of a House Resolution. The Speaker is the chief leadership position of the body. The other House leaders are elected by their respective party caucuses. The Majority Leader determines which bills are brought to the floor for debate (from an Agenda prepared by the Speaker of the House) and manages debates and floor votes.

Qualifications

Members of the House of Representatives must be citizens of the United States, have lived in Delaware for three years, been a resident of their constituent district for at least one year preceding their election and must be at least 24 years old by the time of their election.

Party As of September 2014
     Democratic Party 27
     Republican Party 14
Total 41


The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Delaware State House of Representatives from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the Delaware State House.PNG

Joint committees

External links

References