Difference between revisions of "Delaware school districts"

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==In the news==
 
==In the news==
 
===Special education inconsistencies===
 
===Special education inconsistencies===
A June 2014 progress report conducted by the U.S. Department of Education revealed that the assistance being given to special education "needs intervention." The state of [[Delaware]] was given the low mark after the national department revamped how it oversees states' compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. [[California]] and [[Texas]] were also given the same rating. The largest issue in Delaware was the percentage of special-needs students who didn't take the reading portion of the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) test. In the eyes of the Department of Education, this means they aren't holding their students to a high enough standard. If Delaware stays in this category for three years, the state could face corrective action and even the loss of federal funding. Sen. [[Greg Lavelle]] called the results of the report "embarassing," while Marie Anne Aghazadian, director of the Parent Information Center of Delaware, said, "Obviously, these results are not good [...] But I don't think it's a disaster." The state did better when it came to education for children from birth through age 2, and earned a "meets requirements" in that area.<ref>[http://www.delawareonline.com/story/news/education/2014/06/24/feds-del-needs-intervention-special-ed/11305993/ ''www.delawareonline.com,'' "Feds: Del. 'needs intervention' on special ed," June 24, 2014]</ref>
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A June 2014 progress report conducted by the U.S. Department of Education revealed that the assistance being given to special education "needs intervention." The state of [[Delaware]] was given the low mark after the national department revamped how it oversees states' compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. [[California]] and [[Texas]] were also given the same rating. The largest issue in Delaware was the percentage of special-needs students who didn't take the reading portion of the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) test. In the eyes of the Department of Education, this means they aren't holding their students to a high enough standard. If Delaware stays in this category for three years, the state could face corrective action and even the loss of federal funding. Sen. [[Greg Lavelle]] called the results of the report "embarassing," while Marie Anne Aghazadian, director of the Parent Information Center of Delaware, said, "Obviously, these results are not good [...] But I don't think it's a disaster." The state did better when it came to education for children from birth through age two, and earned a "meets requirements" in that area.<ref>[http://www.delawareonline.com/story/news/education/2014/06/24/feds-del-needs-intervention-special-ed/11305993/ ''www.delawareonline.com,'' "Feds: Del. 'needs intervention' on special ed," June 24, 2014]</ref>
  
 
==School board elections==
 
==School board elections==

Revision as of 09:53, 9 July 2014

K-12 Education in Delaware
Flag of Delaware.png
Education facts
State Superintendent: Mark Murphy
Number of students: 128,946[1]
Number of teachers: 8,587
Teacher/pupil ratio: 1:15
Number of school districts: 44
Number of schools: 221
Graduation rate: 80%[2]
Per-pupil spending: $12,685[3]
See also
Delaware Department of Education
Delaware school districts
List of school districts in Delaware
Delaware
School boards portal
Policypedia
Education policy logo.jpg
Education policy project
Public education in the United States
Public education in Delaware
Glossary of education terms

Delaware is home to 221 schools and 128,946 K-12 students.[4]

Quick facts

State school administrators

  • State Board of Education
    • Secretary Mark Murphy, Executive Secretary
    • Donna Johnson, Executive Director
    • Dr. Teri Quinn Gray, President
    • Jorge L. Melendez, Vice President
    • Gregory B. Coverdale, Jr.
    • G. Patrick Heffernan
    • Randall L. Hughes II
    • Barbara B. Rutt
    • Terry M. Whittaker

Statistics

The following table displays the state's top five school districts by total student enrollment.

Student enrollment
1.) Christina School District
2.) Red Clay Consolidated School District
3.) Brandywine School District
4.) Colonial School District
5.) Appoquinimink School District

Demographics

See also: Demographic information for all students in all 50 states

The following table displays the ethnic distribution of students in Delaware as reported in the National Center for Education Statistics Common Core of Data for 2011-2012.[5]

Demographic Information for Delaware's K-12 Public School System
Ethnicity Students State Percentage United States Percentage**
American Indian 622 0.48% 1.10%
Asian 4,421 3.43% 4.68%
African American 40,793 31.64% 15.68%
Hawaiian Nat./Pacific Isl. Students 81 0.06% 0.42%
Hispanic 16,846 13.06% 24.37%
White 63,876 49.54% 51.21%
Two or More 2,307 1.79% 2.54%
**Note: This is the percentage of all students in the United States that are reported to be of this ethnicity.

In the news

Special education inconsistencies

A June 2014 progress report conducted by the U.S. Department of Education revealed that the assistance being given to special education "needs intervention." The state of Delaware was given the low mark after the national department revamped how it oversees states' compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. California and Texas were also given the same rating. The largest issue in Delaware was the percentage of special-needs students who didn't take the reading portion of the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) test. In the eyes of the Department of Education, this means they aren't holding their students to a high enough standard. If Delaware stays in this category for three years, the state could face corrective action and even the loss of federal funding. Sen. Greg Lavelle called the results of the report "embarassing," while Marie Anne Aghazadian, director of the Parent Information Center of Delaware, said, "Obviously, these results are not good [...] But I don't think it's a disaster." The state did better when it came to education for children from birth through age two, and earned a "meets requirements" in that area.[6]

School board elections

Upcoming elections

See also: Delaware school board elections, 2014

A total of five Delaware school districts among America's largest school districts by enrollment held elections in 2014 for six seats. Each district held its election on May 13, 2014.

Here are several quick facts about Delaware's school board elections in 2014:

  • The largest school district by enrollment with an election in 2014 was Christina School District with 17,190 K-12 students.
  • The smallest school district by enrollment with an election in 2014 was Appoquinimink School District with 9,319 K-12 students.
  • Christina School District had the most seats on the ballot in 2014 with two seats up for election.
  • Four districts were tied for the fewest seats on the ballot in 2014 with one seat up for election in each district.

The districts listed below served 62,848 K-12 students during the 2010-2011 school year, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.[7] Click on the district names for more information on the district and its school board elections.

2014 Delaware School Board Elections
District Date Seats up for election Total board seats Student enrollment
Appoquinimink School District 5/13/2014 1 5 9,319
Brandywine School District 5/13/2014 1 7 10,657
Christina School District 5/13/2014 2 7 17,190
Colonial School District 5/13/2014 1 7 9,871
Red Clay Consolidated School District 5/13/2014 1 7 15,811


See also

External links

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References