Difference between revisions of "Don Young"

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|party = Republican
 
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|total raised = $1,003,531

Revision as of 15:44, 21 October 2013

Don Young
Don Young.jpg
U.S. House, Alaska
Incumbent
In office
1973-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 41
PartyRepublican
PredecessorNick Begich (D)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First electedMarch 6, 1973
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Alaska State Senate
1970-1973
Alaska House of Representatives
1966-1970
Mayor, Fort Yukon
1964-1966
Education
Bachelor'sChico State University, 1958
Associate'sYuba Junior College, 1952
Military service
Service/branchUnited States Army
Years of service1955-1957
Personal
BirthdayJune 9, 1933
Place of birthMeridian, California
ProfessionTeacher, Riverboat Captain, Politician
Net worth$872,504
ReligionEpiscopalian
Websites
Office website
Don Young (b. June 9, 1933, in Meridian, California) is a Republican member of the U.S. House representing Alaska's at-large congressional district. Young was first elected to the House in 1973.

Young most recently won re-election to the U.S. House on November 6, 2012.[1][2] He defeated John R. Cox and Terre Gales in the Republican primary on August 28, 2012. He then defeated Sharon Cissna (D), Jim McDermott (L) and Ted Gianoutsos (I) in the general election on November 6, 2012.

Young began his political career by serving as Mayor of Fort Yukon, Alaska, from 1960 to 1968. He also served in the Alaska House of Representatives from 1966 to 1970. Young then won election to the Alaska State Senate in 1970. He remained a state senator until his election to the U.S. House in 1972.

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Young is a more moderate right of center Republican Party vote. As a result, he may break with the Republican Party line more than his fellow members.

Young is seeking re-election to his 21st term in the U.S. House in 2014.[3]

Biography

Young was born in Meridian, California. He earned his A.A. from Yuba Junior College in 1952 and his B.A. from California State University in 1958.[4]

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Young's academic, professional and political career:[5]

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Young serves on the following committees:[6][7]

  • Natural Resources Committee
    • Subcommittee on Indian and Alaska Native Affairs, Chair
    • Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation
    • Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans and Insular Affairs
  • Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
    • Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation
    • Subcommittee on Highways and Transit
    • Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment

2011-2012

Young served on the following committees:[8]

  • Natural Resources Committee
    • Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans and Insular Affairs
    • Subcommittee on Indian and Alaska Native Affairs, Chair
    • Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands
  • Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
    • Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation
    • Subcommittee on Highways and Transit
    • Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment

Issues

Campaign themes

2014

Young's official website lists the following issues:[9]

  • Alaska Energy Issues
Excerpt: "The high price of energy hasn’t been felt harder anywhere than it has in Alaska. While gas prices are again looking to surpass $4/gallon, no long-term energy plan has been enacted since the last price spike in 2008. Much of rural Alaska is experiencing prices over $7/gallon, and this is simply unacceptable because we all know that we can do better. Whether it is the price of fuel or electricity, Alaskans are, in many cases, needlessly suffering with high prices."
  • Budget
Excerpt: "Our national economy has, no doubt, undergone recent economic setbacks. As a result, Alaskans and Americans nationwide have been forced to reduce spending in order to pay for basic necessities. However, with the introduction of H.Con.Res. 85 (the President’s FY2010 Budget), the federal government appears to believe that a massive increase in spending is the best solution. I completely disagree, which is why I voted against H.Con.Res. 85 when it came to the House floor for a vote."
  • Defense
Excerpt: "It is vital that we provide the best training possible to our men and women in the military. The Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex (JPARC) has the potential to be the premier training grounds for all branches of our military. From the immense air and land space to the water along Alaska’s vast coastline, our troops can work together in joint training operations and prepare for real world war scenarios."
  • Education
Excerpt: "As a former teacher, I am committed to providing our nation’s children with the best possible education. I firmly believe in the original goals of NCLB, but I understand that a “one size fits all” approach to student achievement is not possible. It is time we address the law’s shortcomings and pass meaningful reform legislation."
  • Energy Independence
Excerpt: "Said quite simply--America must become energy independent. We have no other choice unless we are prepared to continue financing foreign governments. But the good news is that we have the ability to, and that Alaska can lead the way. It is no secret that 65% of all oil consumed in the U.S. comes from foreign sources, and domestic oil production has reached lows not seen since 1947."

Legislative actions

113th Congress

CongressLogo.png

The 113th Congress has had 55 out of 5,401 introduced bills enacted into law (1%) as of November 30, 2013. Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 1.14% of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session.[10] For more information pertaining to Young's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[11]

National security

National Defense Authorization Act

Voted "Yes" Young voted for HR 1960 - the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. The bill passed the House on June 14, 2013, with a vote of 315 - 108. Both parties were somewhat divided on the vote.[12]

Department of Homeland Security Appropriations

Voted "Yes" Young voted for HR 2217 - the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2014. The bill passed the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 245 - 182 that was largely along party lines.[13]

Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act

Voted "Yes" Young voted for HR 624 - the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act. The bill passed the House on April 18, 2013, with a vote of 288 - 127. The bill would allow federal intelligence agencies to share cybersecurity intelligence and information with private entities and utilities. The bill was largely supported by Republicans but divided the Democratic Party.[14]

Economy

Federal Statutory Pay Adjustment Elimination

Neutral/Abstain Young did not vote on HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees. The bill passed the House on February 15, 2013, with a vote of 261 - 154. The bill would prevent a 0.5% pay increase for all federal workers from taking effect, saving the federal government $11 billion over 10 years.[15]

Immigration

Morton Memos Enforcement Prohibition

Neutral/Abstain Young did not vote on House Amendment 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order. The amendment was adopted by the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 224 - 201. The purpose of the amendment as stated on the official text is to "prohibit the use of funds to finalize, implement, administer, or enforce the Morton Memos." These memos would have granted administrative amnesty to certain illegal aliens residing in the United States.[16] The vote largely followed party lines.[17]

Healthcare

Health Care Reform Rules

Neutral/Abstain Young did not vote on House Amendment 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The amendment was adopted by the House on August 2, 2013, with a vote of 227-185. The amendment requires that all changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act be approved by Congress before taking effect. The vote was largely along party lines.[18]

Social issues

Abortion

Voted "Yes" Young voted for HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. The resolution passed the House on June 18, 2013, with a vote of 228 - 196 that largely followed party lines. The purpose of the bill is to ban abortions that would take place 20 or more weeks after fertilization.[19]

Previous congressional sessions

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Young voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was 1 of 85 Republicans that voted in favor of the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257 - 167 vote on January 1, 2013.[20]

Campaign finance investigation

On March 19, 2013, the House Ethics Committee appointed an investigative panel to examine charges of misuse of campaign funds that were brought against Young by a former campaign aide. These charges alleged that he had spent money intended for campaigns on hunting trips and charter flights in Alaska. Other charges that are being investigated by the panel include assertions that he took hunting trips between 2001 and 2007 that were funded by an anonymous third party and which were not properly disclosed under House financial disclosure rules. A spokesman for young stated that he, “has cooperated with the committee and will continue to do so.” [21] The chair selected for the panel was Pennsylvania Republican Rep. Patrick Meehan. The other members of the panel are Texas Republican Rep. William “Mac” Thornberry and Massachusetts Democratic Reps. Michael Capuano and William Keating.[22]

Elections

2014

See also: Alaska's at-large congressional district elections, 2014

Young is seeking re-election to his 21st term representing Alaska's at-large congressional district in 2014.[23]

2012

See also: Alaska's at-large congressional district elections, 2012

Young won re-election in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Alaska's at-large District. He defeated John R. Cox and Terre Gales in the Republican primary on August 28, 2012. He then defeated Sharon Cissna (D), Jim McDermott (L) and Ted Gianoutsos (I) in the general election on November 6, 2012.[24][25][26]

U.S. House, Alaska At-Large General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngDon Young 63.9% 185,296
     Democratic Sharon M. Cissna 28.6% 82,927
     Libertarian Jim C. McDermott 5.2% 15,028
     NA Ted Gianoutsos 1.9% 5,589
Total Votes 289,804
Source: Alaska Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"
U.S. House, Alaska at-large District Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDon Young Incumbent 78.6% 58,789
John Cox 14.9% 11,179
Terre Gales 6.5% 4,841
Total Votes 74,809

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Young is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Young raised a total of $11,373,239 during that time period. This information was last updated on March 22, 2013.[47]

Don Young's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 US House (Alaska, At-large district) Won $1,003,531
2010 US House (Alaska, At-large district) Won $1,001,015
2008 US House (Alaska, At-large district) Won $1,407,578
2006 US House (Alaska, At-large district) Won $1,919,782
2004 US House (Alaska, At-large district) Won $2,482,929
2002 US House (Alaska, At-large district) Won $2,260,826
2000 US House (Alaska, At-large district) Won $1,297,578
Grand Total Raised $11,373,239

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Young's reports.[48]

Don Young (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[49]April 11, 2013$508,299.46$61,942.22$(64,668.17)$505,573.51
July Quarterly[50]July 12, 2013$505,573.51$63,076.05$(51,683.50)$516,966.06
October Quarterly[51]October 9, 2013$516,966.06$175,657.87$(59,916.62)$632,707.31
Running totals
$300,676.14$(176,268.29)

2012

Breakdown of the source of Young's campaign funds before the 2012 election.

Young won re-election to the U.S. House in 2012. During that election cycle, Young's campaign committee raised a total of $1,003,531 and spent $665,974.[52] This is less than the average $1.5 million spent by House winners in 2012.[53]

Cost per vote

Young spent $3.59 per vote received in 2012.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Young's campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Young won re-election to the U.S. House in 2010. During that election cycle, Young's campaign committee raised a total of $1,001,015 and spent $887,310.[54]

His top 5 contributors between 2009-2010 were:

U.S. House, Alaska, 2010 - Don Young Campaign Contributions
Total Raised $1,001,015
Total Spent $887,310
Total Raised by General Election Opponent $240,439
Total Spent by General Election Opponent $235,571
Top contributors to Don Young's campaign committee
Edison Chouest Offshore$40,600
Blank Rome LLP$15,750
ConocoPhillips$10,800
National Assn of Home Builders$10,000
National Auto Dealers Assn$10,000
Top 5 industries that contributed to campaign committee
Sea Transport$78,500
Lobbyists$71,873
Lawyers/Law Firms$47,795
Transportation Unions$42,000
General Contractors$37,200

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Young is a "rank-and-file Republican" as of June 2013.[55]

Like-minded colleagues

The website OpenCongress tracks the voting records of each member to determine with whom he or she votes most and least often. The results include a member from each party.[56]

Young most often votes with:

Young least often votes with:

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Young missed 3,631 of 23,856 roll call votes from March 1973 to March 2013. This amounts to 15.2%, which is worse than the median of 2.2% among current congressional representatives as of March 2013.[57]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Young paid his congressional staff a total of $1,104,360 in 2011. He ranked 231st on the list of the lowest paid Republican representative staff salaries and ranked 62nd overall of the highest paid representative staff salaries in 2011. Overall, Alaska ranked 1st in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[58]

Staff bonuses

According to an analysis by CNN, Young is one of nearly 25% of House members who gave their staff bonuses in 2012. Young's staff was given an apparent $1,022.22 in bonus money.[59]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Young's net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $495,008 and $1,250,000. That averages to $872,504, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican representatives in 2011 of $7,859,232. His average net worth increased by 3.87% from 2010.[60]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Young's net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $480,007 and $1,200,000. That averages to $840,003.50, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican representatives in 2010 of $7,561,133.[61]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

2012

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Young ranked 222nd in the conservative rankings in 2012.[62]

2011

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Young ranked 200th in the conservative rankings.[63]

Voting with party

2013

The website OpenCongress tracks how often members of Congress vote with the majority of the chamber caucus. According to the website, Young has voted with the Republican Party 97.5% of the time, which ranked 92nd among the 233 House Republican members as of June 2013.[64]

Personal

Young is a widower and has two children.

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Don + Young + Alaska + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

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External links


References

  1. ABC News, "2012 General Election Results Alaska," accessed November 7, 2012
  2. ktuu.com, "Rep. Don Young Files to Run for 21st Term," February 22, 2012
  3. Roll Call, "Don Young to File for Re-Election #AKAL," July 3, 2013
  4. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress "YOUNG, Donald Edwin, (1933 - )"
  5. Biographical Director of the United States Congress "Donald Edwin Young," Accessed October 30, 2011
  6. CQ.com - Roll Call, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress," accessed January 18, 2013
  7. MarineLog, "Schuster to Chair House T&I Committee," January 4, 2013
  8. Don Young, Congressman for All Alaska "Biography"
  9. Office website, "Issues," accessed September 12, 2013
  10. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, First Session of the 112th Congress," accessed September 5, 2013
  11. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, Second Session of the 113th Congress," accessed March 4, 2014
  12. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1960 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  13. Project Vote Smart, "HR 2217 - Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  14. Project Vote Smart, "HR 624 - Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  15. Project Vote Smart, "HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  16. The Library of Congress, "H.AMDT.136," accessed September 16, 2013
  17. Project Vote Smart, "H Amdt 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  18. Project Votesmart, "H Amdt 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  19. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  20. U.S. House "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.
  21. NYTimes.com "House Ethics Panel Finds Cause to Investigate 2 Lawmakers" March 19, 2013
  22. Mcclatchydc.com "Ethics Committee investigating Rep. Don Young of Alaska" March 20, 2013
  23. Roll Call, "Don Young to File for Re-Election #AKAL," July 3, 2013
  24. ABC News, "2012 General Election Results Alaska," accessed November 7, 2012
  25. Alaska Secretary of State, Primary candidate list
  26. Associated Press primary results
  27. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  28. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  29. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  30. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  31. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  32. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  33. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  34. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  35. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  36. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  37. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013
  38. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1988," accessed March 28, 2013
  39. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 1986," accessed March 28, 2013
  40. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1984," accessed March 28, 2013
  41. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 1982," accessed March 28, 2013
  42. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 1980," accessed March 28, 2013
  43. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 1978," accessed March 28, 2013
  44. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 1976," accessed March 28, 2013
  45. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 1974," accessed March 28, 2013
  46. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 1972," accessed March 28, 2013
  47. Open Secrets "Career Fundraising for Don Young," Accessed March 22, 2013
  48. Federal Election Commission "Don Young Summary Report," Accessed July 22, 2013
  49. 'Federal Election Commission "Don Young April Quarterly," Accessed July 22, 2013
  50. 'Federal Election Commission "Don Young July Quarterly," Accessed July 22, 2013
  51. 'Federal Election Commission "Don Young October Quarterly," Accessed October 21, 2013
  52. Open Secrets "Don Young 2012 Election Cycle," Accessed February 19, 2013
  53. Open Secrets, "Election 2012: The Big Picture Shows Record Cost of Winning a Seat in Congress," June 19, 2013
  54. Open Secrets "Don Young 2010 Election Cycle," Accessed October 30, 2011
  55. Gov Track "Don Young," Accessed June 7 2013
  56. OpenCongress, "Don Young," Accessed July 30, 2013
  57. GovTrack, "Don Young," Accessed April 2, 2013
  58. LegiStorm "Don Young"
  59. CNN Politics, "Congressional bonuses in a time of cuts," accessed March 8, 2013
  60. OpenSecrets.org, "Young, (R-Alaska), 2011"
  61. OpenSecrets.org, "Young, (R-Alaska), 2010"
  62. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," February 21, 2013
  63. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  64. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed June 6, 2013
Political offices
Preceded by
Nick Begich
U.S. House of Representatives - Alaska, At-large
1973-Present
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Alaska State Senate
1970-1973
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Alaska House of Representatives
1966-1970
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Mayor, Fort Yukon
1964-1966
Succeeded by
'