Ed Pastor

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Ed Pastor
Ed Pastor.jpg
U.S. House, Arizona, District 7
Incumbent
In office
1991-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 23
PartyDemocratic
PredecessorJohn Shadegg (D)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First electedSeptember 24, 1991
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Campaign $$6,733,887
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Board of Supervisors, Maricopa County
1976-1991
Education
Bachelor'sArizona State University, 1966
J.D.Arizona State University, 1974
Personal
BirthdayJune 28, 1943
Place of birthClaypool, Arizona
ProfessionAttorney, Politician
Net worth$1,145,506
ReligionRoman Catholic
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
Ed Pastor (b. June 28, 1943 in Claypool, Arizona) is a Democratic member of the U.S. House representing Arizona's 7th congressional district. Pastor was first elected to the House in 1991.

Pastor most recently won re-election in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Arizona's 7th District. He defeated Rebecca DeWitt in the Democratic primary on August 28, 2012. He then defeated Scott Fistler (R write-in) and Joe Cobb (L) in the general election on November 6, 2012.[1]

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Pastor is an average Democratic member of Congress, meaning he will vote with the Democratic Party on the majority of bills.

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Pastor's academic, professional and political career:[2]

  • 1966: Graduated from Arizona State University, Tempe with B.A.
  • 1974: Graduated from Arizona State College of Law with J.D.
  • 1971-1972: Aide to Arizona Governor Raul Castro
  • 1977-1991: Maricopa County Supervisor
  • 1972-2008: Delegate, Democratic National Conventions
  • 1991-Present: U.S Representative from Arizona

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Pastor serves on the following committees:[3]

2011-2012

Pastor served on the following committees:[4]

  • Appropriations Committee
    • Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies

Issues

Campaign themes

2012

Pastor 's campaign website listed the following issues:[5]

  • Economy
Excerpt: "I have always believed that our obligations to current and future generations of Americans require fiscal responsibility and a commitment to broad-based economic prosperity. We must work together to balance the budget and reduce our national debt, so that debt payments do not undermine our children's economic prospects."
  • Education
Excerpt: "As a former chemistry teacher, I believe that education is a lifelong activity that is essential not only to improving the lives of individuals, but to improving the health, security and prosperity of our communities. The federal government plays an important role in expanding educational opportunities."
  • Energy
Excerpt: "Energy costs are a growing burden on family budgets, while energy production poses an increasing threat to our environment. As a member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water, I am proud to support a strong national investment in programs promoting research and development of clean and renewable energy technologies."
  • Health Care
Excerpt: "Millions of Americans cannot afford the comprehensive health insurance they need to receive quality preventative health care in addition to emergency care. The employer-based insurance system our nation relies on excludes many workers and their families, strains small businesses, and no longer meets our nation's needs. For that reason, I have long advocated for universal comprehensive health coverage and have co-sponsored and voted for the Affordable Care Act."

Specific votes

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Pastor voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was one of 172 Democrats that voted in favor of the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257/167 vote on January 1, 2013.[6]

Elections

2014

See also: Arizona's 7th congressional district elections, 2014

Pastor is set to run for re-election to the U.S. House in 2014. If he runs, he will seek the Democratic nomination in the primary election on August 26, 2014. The general election takes place November 4, 2014.

2012

See also: Arizona's 7th congressional district elections, 2012

Pastor won re-election in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Arizona's 7th District. He defeated Rebecca DeWitt in the Democratic primary on August 28, 2012. He then defeated Scott Fistler (R write-in) and Joe Cobb (L) in the general election on November 6, 2012.[7][8][9]

U.S. House, Arizona District 7 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor Incumbent 81.7% 104,489
     Libertarian Joe Cobb 18.3% 23,338
Total Votes 127,827
Source: Arizona Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"


U.S. House, Arizona District 7 Democratic Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor Incumbent 79% 22,664
Rebecca DeWitt 21% 6,013
Total Votes 28,677

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Pastor is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Pastor raised a total of $6,733,887 during that time period. This information was last updated on March 22, 2013.[21]

Ed Pastor's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 US House (Arizona, District 7) Won $1,025,610
2010 US House (Arizona, District 4) Won $1,014,291
2008 US House (Arizona, District 4) Won $1,174,759
2006 US House (Arizona, District 4) Won $1,092,996
2004 US House (Arizona, District 4) Won $845,637
2002 US House (Arizona, District 4) Won $837,418
2000 US House (Arizona, District 2) Won $743,176
Grand Total Raised $6,733,887

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Pastor's reports.[22]

Ed Pastor (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[23]April 15, 2013$1,314,389.49$89,581.25$(49,899.21)$1,354,071.53
July Quarterly[24]July 15, 2013$1,354,071.53$65,181.76$(68,594.06)$1,350,659.23
Running totals
$154,763.01$(118,493.27)

2012

Breakdown of the source of Pastor's campaign funds before the 2012 election.

Pastor won re-election to the U.S. House in 2012. During that election cycle, Pastor's campaign committee raised a total of $1,025,610 and spent $1,103,157.[25] This is less than the average $1.5 million spent by House winners in 2012.[26]

Cost per vote

Pastor spent $10.56 per vote received in 2012.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Pastor's campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Pastor won re-election to the U.S. House in 2010. During that election cycle, Pastor's campaign committee raised a total of $1,014,291 and spent $1,092,555.[27]

His top 5 contributors between 2009-2010 were:

Analysis

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Pastor missed 251 of 14,163 roll call votes from October 1991 to March 2013. This amounts to 1.8%, which is worse than the median of 2.2% among current congressional representatives as of March 2013.[28]

Like-minded colleagues

The website Open Congress tracks the voting records of each member to determine with whom he or she votes most and least often. The results include a member from each party.[29]

Pastor most often votes with:

Pastor least often votes with:

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Pastor paid his congressional staff a total of $757,011 in 2011. He ranked 3rd on the list of the lowest paid Democratic Representative Staff Salaries and he ranked 31st overall of the lowest paid Representative Staff Salaries in 2011. Overall, Arizona ranked 47th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[30]

Staff bonuses

According to an analysis by CNN, Pastor was one of nearly 25 percent of House members who gave their staff bonuses in 2012. Pastor's staff was given an apparent $15,500.00 in bonus money.[31]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, Pastor's net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $701,012 and $1,590,000. That averages to $1,145,506, which is lower than the average net worth of Democratic Representatives in 2011 of $5,107,874. His average net worth increased by 6.86% from 2010.[32]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, Pastor's net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $614,012 and $1,529,998. That averages to $1,072,005, which is lower than the average net worth of Democratic Representatives in 2010 of $4,465,875.[33]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

2012

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Pastor ranked 94th in the liberal rankings in 2012.[34]

2011

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Pastor ranked 95th in the liberal rankings.[35]

Voting with party

2013

Ed Pastor voted with the Democratic Party 94.5% of the time, which ranked 132nd among the 201 House Democratic members as of June 2013.[36]

Personal

Pastor and his wife, Verma, have two children.

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Ed + Pastor + Arizona + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

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External links


References

  1. ABC News, "General Election Results 2012-Arizona," November 7, 2012
  2. Biographical Director of the United States Congress "Ed Pastor," Accessed October 30, 2011
  3. CQ.com - Roll Call, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress," accessed January 18, 2013
  4. Congressman Ed Pastor, Serving the 4th District of Arizona "Meet Ed"
  5. Campaign website, Issues
  6. U.S. House "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.
  7. ABC News, "General Election Results 2012-Arizona," November 7, 2012
  8. Official primary candidate list
  9. Associated Press primary results
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  15. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  16. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  17. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  18. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  19. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  20. Wikipedia, "Ed Pastor," accessed April 22, 2013
  21. Open Secrets "Career Fundraising for Ed Pastor," Accessed March 22, 2013
  22. Federal Election Commission "Ed Pastor Summary Report," Accessed July 22, 2013
  23. 'Federal Election Commission "Ed Pastor April Quarterly," Accessed July 22, 2013
  24. 'Federal Election Commission "Ed Pastor July Quarterly," Accessed July 22, 2013
  25. Open Secrets "Ed Pastor 2012 Election Cycle," Accessed February 19, 2013
  26. Open Secrets, "Election 2012: The Big Picture Shows Record Cost of Winning a Seat in Congress," June 19, 2013
  27. Open Secrets "Ed Pastor 2010 Election Cycle," Accessed October 30, 2011
  28. GovTrack, "Ed Pastor," Accessed April 2, 2013
  29. OpenCongress, "Ed Pastor," Accessed July 30, 2013
  30. LegiStorm "Ed Pastor"
  31. CNN Politics, "Congressional bonuses in a time of cuts," accessed March 8, 2013
  32. OpenSecrets.org, "Pastor, (D-Arizona), 2011"
  33. OpenSecrets.org, "Pastor, (D-Arizona), 2010"
  34. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," February 21, 2013
  35. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  36. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
Political offices
Preceded by
John Shadegg
U.S. House of Representatives - Arizona, District 7
1991-Present
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Board of Supervisors, Maricopa County
1976-1991
Succeeded by
'