Read the State Legislative Tracker. New edition available now!

Difference between revisions of "Eric Shinseki"

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(VA hospital waiting lines)
Line 102: Line 102:
 
Despite the delays in care in facilities across the United States, many hospital and regional directors received bonuses worth between $7,500 to $80,000.<ref>[http://veterans.house.gov/accountability ''House Committee on Veterans Affairs'', "VA Accountability," accessed April 28, 2014]</ref>
 
Despite the delays in care in facilities across the United States, many hospital and regional directors received bonuses worth between $7,500 to $80,000.<ref>[http://veterans.house.gov/accountability ''House Committee on Veterans Affairs'', "VA Accountability," accessed April 28, 2014]</ref>
  
On May 5, 2014, the American Legion, the largest veteran organization in the U.S., and Concerned Veterans for America called for the resignation of Secretary [[Eric Shinseki|Shinseki]].<ref>[http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/05/politics/veterans-groups-seek-shinseki-resignation/ ''CNN'', "Two key veterans groups call for VA chief Eric Shinseki to resign," May 5, 2014]</ref> American Legion's director stated, "At least let us know that the problems exist and they have a plan to take care of it," when asked about the lack of communication from the VA. Shinseki responded to the calls for resignation, saying, "I serve at the pleasure of the president. I signed on to make some changes, I have work to do."<ref>[http://online.wsj.com/news/article_email/SB10001424052702303417104579546390034288748-lMyQjAxMTA0MDAwNjEwNDYyWj ''Wall Street Journal'', "Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki Says He Won't Resign," May 6, 2014]</ref>
+
On May 5, 2014, the American Legion, the largest veteran organization in the U.S., and Concerned Veterans for America called for the resignation of Secretary Shinseki.<ref>[http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/05/politics/veterans-groups-seek-shinseki-resignation/ ''CNN'', "Two key veterans groups call for VA chief Eric Shinseki to resign," May 5, 2014]</ref> American Legion's director stated, "At least let us know that the problems exist and they have a plan to take care of it," when asked about the lack of communication from the VA. Shinseki responded to the calls for resignation, saying, "I serve at the pleasure of the president. I signed on to make some changes, I have work to do."<ref>[http://online.wsj.com/news/article_email/SB10001424052702303417104579546390034288748-lMyQjAxMTA0MDAwNjEwNDYyWj ''Wall Street Journal'', "Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki Says He Won't Resign," May 6, 2014]</ref>
  
 
==Personal==
 
==Personal==

Revision as of 14:55, 15 May 2014

Eric Shinseki
Eric Shinseki official Veterans Affairs portrait.jpg
U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs
Elections and appointments
NominatedDecember 6, 2008
ConfirmedJanuary 20, 2009
AppointedJanuary 21, 2009
Appointed byBarack Obama
Education
High schoolKauai High School
Bachelor'sUnited States Military Academy
Master'sDuke University
OtherArmor Officer Advanced Course, United States Army Command and General Staff College and the National War College
Military service
Service/branchArmy Chief of Staff
Years of service1999-2003
CitationsDefense Distinguished Service Medal

Army Distinguished Service Medal
Legion of Merit (x2)
Bronze Star (x3)
Purple Heart (x2)
Meritorious Service Medal
Air Medal

Army Commendation Medal (x2)
Service branchArmy Vice Chief of Staff
Years of service1998-1999
Personal
BirthdayNovember 28, 1942
Place of birthLihue, Hawaii
ProfessionMilitary commander
Websites
Office website
Eric Ken Shinseki (b. November 28, 1942, in Lihue, Hawaii) is the current United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs. He was confirmed by the Senate on January 20, 2009, by a voice vote.[1]

Shinseki previously served in the United States Army for 38 years, as well as sitting on the boards of military contracting companies Ducommun and Honeywell and Hawaiian companies Grove Farm Corp and First Hawaiian Bank.[2]

Biography

Shinseki was born in Lihue, Hawaii, where he attended Kauai High School.[3] He graduated from the United States Military Academy before beginning his 38 year military career. During his service, Shinseki earned his M.A. from Duke University.[4] He served in Vietnam and Bosnia and was injured twice in combat.[3]

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Shinseki's academic, professional and political career:[5][4][2]

  • 1965: Graduated from the United States Military Academy
  • 1965-1966: Second Lieutenant of Artillery in the United States Army in Vietnam
  • 1967-1968: Assistant Secretary and Secretary to the General Staff in the United States Army in Hawaii
  • 1969-1970: Commander of the Troop A, 3d Squadron, 5th Cavalry Regiment in the United States Army in Vietnam
  • 1976: Earned M.A. from Duke University
  • 1984-1985: Commander of the First Calvary Division
  • 1989-1990: G-3 for the VII US Corps
  • 1996-1997: Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans in the United States Army
  • 1997-1998: Commanding General in the United States Army
  • 1998-1999: Vice Chief of Staff for the United States Army
  • 1999-2003: Chief of Staff for the United States Army
  • 2008-Present: U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs

Note: Some assignments were not given a timeline, including Shinseki's service as: "Commander, 3rd Squadron, 7th Cavalry, 3rd Infantry Division; Commander, 2nd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division; Deputy Chief of Staff, Support for Allied Land Forces Southern Europe; Assistant Division Commander-Maneuver, 3rd Infantry Division; Commander, 1st Cavalry Division."[4]

Confirmation vote

Shinseki was confirmed by the Senate on January 20, 2009, by a voice vote.[1]

Controversies

VA hospital waiting lines

According to reports by CNN, veterans hospitals across the country were delaying care of veteran patients, at times to the point that some veterans conditions deteriorated vastly or died due to the wait times. To cover for the long delays, some hospitals resorted to "secret lists" for patients awaiting care in order to keep their official wait times down. The following reports were released by CNN:[6]

  • On November 20, 2013, it was reported that at Williams Jennings Bryan Dorn Veterans Medical Center in Columbia, South Carolina, patients were not receiving routine gastrointestinal procedures until up to a year after requesting an appointment, at times even longer. A review of 280 gastrointestinal patients showed that 52 of the patients showed complications due to the delay in care and early detection. The VA confirmed six deaths resulted from delayed care at the hospital, but CNN's sources suggested the number could be as high as 20.[7]
The Dorn hospital also received an addition $1 million in federal funding in 2011 in order to treat the patients on long waiting lists. However, according to documents, only one-third of the the federal funds went to the intended destination. [7]
  • The Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center in Augusta, Georgia, experienced the deaths of three patients due to long delays in treatment and had a waiting list of over 4,500 patients.[7]
  • Between 2010 and 2011, VA internal documents indicated 82 veterans died or were dying in part due to delayed care from VA hospitals in the United States.[8]
  • In the Phoenix Veterans Affairs Health Care system in Phoenix, Arizona, at least 40 veterans died waiting for care. The VA system in Phoenix used a secret waiting list. The secret list was used as a placeholder for patients whose care would be delayed for months. VA guidelines require care be given in a timely manner, usually within three weeks, but the Phoenix system used the secret list to hold names between the times appointments were made until the appointment could be made within the required VA timeline.[6]

Members of the House Veterans Affairs Committee began investigating the VA hospital delays in November 2013.[7] In April 2014, Rep. Jeff Miller (R-FL) ordered all records be preserved and intended to make the issue a congressional investigation.[6]

Despite the delays in care in facilities across the United States, many hospital and regional directors received bonuses worth between $7,500 to $80,000.[9]

On May 5, 2014, the American Legion, the largest veteran organization in the U.S., and Concerned Veterans for America called for the resignation of Secretary Shinseki.[10] American Legion's director stated, "At least let us know that the problems exist and they have a plan to take care of it," when asked about the lack of communication from the VA. Shinseki responded to the calls for resignation, saying, "I serve at the pleasure of the president. I signed on to make some changes, I have work to do."[11]

Personal

Shinseki is married with two children.[3]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Eric + Shinseki + Secretary + Veterans + Affairs

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Eric Shinseki News Feed

  • Loading...

External links

References

Political offices
Preceded by
James B. Peake
U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs
2009-Present
Succeeded by
-