Florida's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2012

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Florida's 2nd Congressional District

General Election Date
November 6, 2012

Primary Date
August 14, 2012

November 6 Election Winner:
Steve Southerland II Republican Party
Incumbent prior to election:
Steve Southerland II Republican Party
Steve Southerland II.jpg

Florida U.S. House Elections
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2012 U.S. Senate Elections

Flag of Florida.png
The 2nd congressional district of Florida held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012.
This is the 2nd congressional district prior to the 2010 redistricting.

Steve Southerland II was re-elected on November 6, 2012.[1]

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
June 8, 2012
August 14, 2012
November 6, 2012

Primary: Florida was one of 21 states to use a strictly closed primary system.

Voter registration: Voters were required to register to vote in the primary by July 16, 2012, which was 29 days before the primary took place .[2] (Information about registering to vote)

See also: Florida elections, 2012

Incumbent: Heading into the election the incumbent was Steve Southerland II (R), who was first elected in 2010.

This was the first election using new district maps based on 2010 Census data. Florida's 2nd congressional district consisted of the eastern part of the Florida Panhandle. It included the counties of Washington, Bay, Jackson, Gulf, Calhoun, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Jefferson, Wakulla, Franklin, Taylor and part of Madison county. [3]

Candidates

Note: Election results were added on election night as races were called. Vote totals were added after official election results had been certified. For more information about Ballotpedia's election coverage plan, click here. If you find any errors in this list, please email: Geoff Pallay.

General election candidates

Democratic Party Alfred Lawson
Republican Party Steve Southerland IIGreen check mark transparent.png
Independent Floyd Patrick Miller


August 14, 2012, primary results

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Note: Jay Liles initially filed but no longer appears on the primary candidate list.[8]

Republican Party Republican Primary

IndependentNo Party Affiliation

Note:Nancy Argenziano abandoned her campaign for Congress in March 2012. She ran instead for the Florida State House[9][10]

Election Results

General Election

U.S. House, Florida District 2 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngSteve Southerland II Incumbent 52.7% 175,856
     Democratic Al Lawson 47.2% 157,634
     Independent Floyd Patrick Miller 0.1% 228
Total Votes 333,718
Source: Florida Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Democratic Primary

The primary took place on August 14.[11]

Florida's 2nd Congressional District Democratic Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngAlfred Lawson 54.6% 46,900
Leonard Bembry 26% 22,357
Alvin Peters 13.9% 11,919
Mark Schlakman 5.4% 4,653
Total Votes 85,829

Race background

Freshman incumbent Steve Southerland II faced a challenge from Democrat Al Lawson in a newly redrawn district which could have favored Lawson. Southerland had received criticism due to his statements referring to his $174,000 congressional salary as "not so much" and saying "This job doesn't mean that much to me." Meanwhile, Southerland had attacked Lawson by tying him to President Obama at every available opportunity.[12]

Florida's 2nd District was included in the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee's "Red to Blue List," which identified districts that the organization has specifically targeted to flip from Republican to Democratic control.[13]

Blue vs. Red

Possible race ratings are:

     Solid Democratic
     Likely Democratic
     Lean Democratic

     Tossup

     Lean Republican
     Likely Republican
     Solid Republican

     Florida's 2nd district was a likely Republican district.

In June 2012, Sabato's Crystal Ball rated Florida's 2nd as a likely Republican district.[14]

Florida's 2nd was considered to be Leaning Republican according to the New York Times race ratings.[15]

Impact of redistricting

See also: Redistricting in Florida

Prior to redistricting the 2nd district consisted of the eastern part of the Florida Panhandle along with much of the Big Bend region along the Emerald Coast, and was anchored in the state capital of Tallahassee and included Panama City.

The 2nd district was re-drawn after the 2010 Census. The new district was composed of the following percentages of voters of the old congressional districts.[16][17]

District partisanship

FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012 study

See also: FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012

In 2012, FairVote did a study on partisanship in the congressional districts, giving each a percentage ranking (D/R) based on the new 2012 maps and comparing that to the old 2010 maps. Florida's 2nd District became more Democratic because of redistricting.[18]

  • 2012: 44D / 56R
  • 2010: 42D / 58R

Cook Political Report's PVI

See also: Cook Political Report's Partisan Voter Index

In 2012, Cook Political Report released its updated figures on the Partisan Voter Index, which measured each congressional district's partisanship relative to the rest of the country. Florida's 2nd congressional district had a PVI of R+3, which was the 204th most Republican district in the country. In 2008, this district was won by John McCain (R), 53-47 percent over Barack Obama (D). In 2004, George W. Bush (R) won the district 52-48 percent over John Kerry (D).[19]

District history

2010

On November 2, 2010, Steve Southerland II won election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Allen Boyd (D), Paul C. McKain (I), Dianne Berryhill (I), Ray Netherwood (I) in the general election.[20]

U.S. House of Representatives, Florida's 2nd Congressional District, General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngSteve Southerland II 53.6% 136,371
     Democratic Allen Boyd 41.4% 105,211
     Independent Paul C. McKain 2.8% 7,135
     Independent Dianne Berryhill 2.2% 5,705
     Independent Ray Netherwood 0% 16
Total Votes 254,438


See also

External links

References

  1. ABC News "2012 General Election Results"
  2. Florida Department of State "Register to Vote," Accessed April 25, 2012
  3. Florida 2012 Redistricting Map "Map" Accessed July 5, 2012
  4. Roll Call "State Lawmaker Launches Bid to Take On Southerland" accessed December 2, 2011
  5. WJHG.com "Peters to Make Run for Congress" accessed December 2, 2011
  6. The Palm Beach Post "Al Lawson to make another bid for Congress," February 9, 2012
  7. AP Results "U.S. House Results" accessed August 14, 2012
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 Florida Election Board "Candidate List" accessed March 29, 2012
  9. Sunshine State News "Blasting GOP, Nancy Argenziano Will Run for Congress as Independent" Accessed December 2, 2011
  10. Tampa Bay Times "Argenziano drops congressional bid, will run for state House instead" Accessed May 11, 2012
  11. Florida Secretary of State, "August 2012 Primary Election," Accessed September 4, 2012
  12. Bradenton Herald, "Panhandle GOP congressman in tough re-election bid," October 30, 2012
  13. DCCC, "Red to Blue 2012"
  14. Center for Politics "2012 House Ratings," Updated June 27, 2012
  15. New York Times "House Race Ratings," Accessed August 7, 2012
  16. Moonshadow Mobile's CensusViewer "Florida's congressional districts 2001-2011 comparison"
  17. Labels & Lists "VoterMapping software voter counts"
  18. "2011 Redistricting and 2012 Elections in Florida," September 2012
  19. Cook Political Report "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008" Accessed October 2012
  20. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010"