Georgia's 1st Congressional District

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Georgia's 1st congressional district
Current incumbentJack Kingston Republican Party
Population703,020
Gender49.2% Male, 50.8% Female
Race65.2% White, 29% Black, 1.9% Asian, 0.2% Native American
Ethnicity6.4%
Unemployment10.2%
Median household income$43,077
High school graduation rate85.1%
College graduation rate22.8%
The 1st Congressional District of Georgia is a congressional district which includes portions of the southeastern part of the state.

Georgia's 1st Congressional District comprises the entire coastal area of Sea Islands and much of the rural southeastern part of the state. In addition to Savannah, the district includes a few modest-sized cities such as Brunswick, Valdosta, Douglas and Waycross.[1]

The district previously included the entire coastal area of Sea Islands and much of the rural southeastern part of the state. In addition to Savannah, the district included a few modest-sized cities such as Brunswick, Valdosta, Douglas and Waycross.

The current representative of the 1st congressional district is Jack Kingston (R).

Elections

2014

See also: Georgia's 1st congressional district elections, 2014

The 1st congressional district of Georgia will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

2012

See also: Georgia's 1st congressional district elections, 2012

The 1st congressional district of Georgia held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent Jack Kingston won re-election in the district.[2]

U.S. House, Georgia District 1 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJack Kingston Incumbent 63% 157,181
     Democratic Lesli Messinger 37% 92,399
Total Votes 249,580
Source: Georgia Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Jack Kingston won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Oscar L. Harris II (D) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Georgia District 1 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJack Kingston incumbent 71.6% 117,270
     Democratic Oscar L. Harris II 28.4% 46,449
Total Votes 163,719

2008
On November 4, 2008, Jack Kingston won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Bill Gillespie (D) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Georgia District 1 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJack Kingston incumbent 66.5% 165,890
     Democratic Bill Gillespie 33.5% 83,444
Total Votes 249,334

2006
On November 7, 2006, Jack Kingston won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jim Nelson (D) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Georgia District 1 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJack Kingston incumbent 68.5% 94,961
     Democratic Jim Nelson 31.5% 43,668
Total Votes 138,629

2004
Kingston ran unopposed for re-election in 2004.

2002
On November 5, 2002, Jack Kingston won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Don Smart (D) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Georgia District 1 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJack Kingston incumbent 72.1% 103,661
     Democratic Don Smart 27.9% 40,026
Total Votes 143,687

2000
On November 7, 2000, Jack Kingston won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Joyce Marie Griggs (D) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Georgia District 1 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJack Kingston incumbent 69.1% 131,684
     Democratic Joyce Marie Griggs 30.9% 58,776
Total Votes 190,460

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 1st congressional district of Georgia after the 2001 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Georgia

In 2011, the Georgia State Legislature re-drew the congressional districts based on updated population information from the 2010 census.

On August 22, 2011, Georgia Republican leadership released their proposed Congressional redistricting map. Due to population growth, Georgia gained a 14th Congressional district following the 2010 census. The new district, according to the plan, will be located in the northwestern part of the state.[8] U.S. Rep. Tom Graves (R) was drawn into the new district, leaving his current 9th District seat open in 2012. The new 9th District will lean Republican.[8] In addition, the plan displaces US Rep. John Barrow (D), but Barrow (who has been displaced before) planned to move in order to remain in the 12th District.[8] US Rep. Sanford Bishop's (D) district will become a majority-minority district. Also, U.S. Rep. Phil Gingrey's (R) 11th District will pick up part of Atlanta. Overall, the plan is expected to bolster the Republican majority in the state's Congressional delegation.[8]

External links

See also

References