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Difference between revisions of "Governor of New Hampshire"

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{{GovLgov}}{{TOCnestright}}The '''Governor of the State of New Hampshire''' is an elected Constitutional officer, the head of the Executive branch, and the highest state office in [[New Hampshire]]. The Governor is popularly elected every two years by a plurality and has no term limit.
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{{New Hampshire SEO infobox}}{{TOCnestright}}The '''Governor of the State of New Hampshire''' is an elected Constitutional officer, the head of the Executive branch, and the highest state office in [[New Hampshire]]. The Governor is popularly elected every two years by a plurality and has no term limit.
  
 
==Current officer==
 
==Current officer==
  
The 90th and current governor of New Hampshire is [[John Lynch]], a Democrat first elected in 2004 and reelected three more times since then.
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The 90th and current governor of New Hampshire is [[John Lynch]], a Democrat first elected in 2004 and re-elected three more times since then. In September 2011, Lynch announced he would not seek an additional term in office, recognizing "democracy demands periodic change. To refresh and revive itself, democracy needs new leaders and new ideas."<ref>[http://www.newhampshire.com/article/20110916/NEWS06/709169997 ''New Hampshire.com,'' "Governor won't seek corner office again," September 19, 2011]</ref>
 
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His wife, Susan Lynch, is the First Lady of New Hampshire.
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==Authority==
 
==Authority==
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|}
 
|}
  
==Requirements==
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==Qualifications==
 
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{{GovLgov}}
 
Candidates for governor must:
 
Candidates for governor must:
  
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* have been a resident of New Hampshire for at least seven years on the day of the election
 
* have been a resident of New Hampshire for at least seven years on the day of the election
  
==Election==
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==Elections==
  
 
[[New Hampshire]] is one of only two states that elects governors biennially, that is, each even-numbered year. For New Hampshire, 2010, 2012, 2014, and 2016 are all gubernatorial election years. Legally, the gubernatorial inauguration is always set for the first Wednesday following the first Tuesday in the January following an election. Thus, January 12, 2011, January 2, 2013, and January 14, 2015 are inaugural days.
 
[[New Hampshire]] is one of only two states that elects governors biennially, that is, each even-numbered year. For New Hampshire, 2010, 2012, 2014, and 2016 are all gubernatorial election years. Legally, the gubernatorial inauguration is always set for the first Wednesday following the first Tuesday in the January following an election. Thus, January 12, 2011, January 2, 2013, and January 14, 2015 are inaugural days.
  
To win the governorship, a candidate must have a plurality of votes; if no candidate does, then the legislature shall convene and choose a winning candidate.
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To win the governorship, a candidate must have a plurality of votes; if no candidate does, then the legislature shall convene and choose a winning candidate from the two highest vote receivers.
  
 
==Vacancies==
 
==Vacancies==
 +
 +
:: ''See also: [[How gubernatorial vacancies are filled]]''
 +
 +
Details of vacancy appointments are addressed under [[Executive Power - Governor, New Hampshire Constitution#Section 49|Executive Power, Section 49 and 49a]].
 +
 +
The state of New Hampshire lacks an office of the Lieutenant Governor, making the President of the Senate the first officer in the line of succession.  At any time she is mentally or physically unable to discharge the office, she shall notify the [[New Hampshire Secretary of State|Secretary of State]] and the Senate President in writing.  By notifying the same two officers again, she shall resume the office.
 +
 +
The [[Attorney General of New Hampshire|Attorney General]] and a majority of the Executive Council may, when they believe the Governor is mentally or physically unfit to serve but it unable or unwilling to take an absence from the office, petition the Supreme Court for a declaratory judgment.  The justices of the Court shall hear the petition and shall also be in charge of considering a petition to consider declaring the Governor able to resume his duties.
 +
 +
If, either by written declaration or court judgment, the Governor has been absent for six months, the General Court may, by concurrent resolution, declare the office vacant.  Similarly, if a Governor-elect fails to take office for any reason other than death or resignation, the Court may declare the office vacant six months after the inauguration date.
 +
 +
Whatever the reason for the vacancy, if more than one year remains in the current term, a special election shall be held.
 +
 +
After the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the [[New Hampshire House of Representatives|House]], the [[New Hampshire Secretary of State|Secretary of State]], and the State Treasurer are next in the line of succession.
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 +
Whoever is filling the office shall have the title of "Acting Governor" and shall have the full powers of the office.  She or he receives compensation equal to that of an elected governor and takes no additional oath of office.  The Acting Governor does not resign the office she was elected to and is instead suspended from those duties while serving as governor.
  
 
==Duties==
 
==Duties==
 
{{nhseal}}
 
{{nhseal}}
Unlike in many other states in which Executive Councils are merely advisory, the Executive Council of New Hampshire has a strong check on the governor's power. The five-member Executive Council has a veto over many actions of the governor.  
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Unlike in many other states in which Executive Councils are merely advisory, the Executive Council of New Hampshire has a strong check on the governor's power. The five-member Executive Council has a veto over many actions of the governor. Under Article 47, both the Governor and the Council "have a negative" on one another.
  
 
Together, the governor and Executive Council approve contracts with a value of $5,000 or more, approve pardons, and appoint the directors and commissioners, judges, the [[Attorney General|attorney general]] and officers in the National Guard.  
 
Together, the governor and Executive Council approve contracts with a value of $5,000 or more, approve pardons, and appoint the directors and commissioners, judges, the [[Attorney General|attorney general]] and officers in the National Guard.  
  
The governor has the sole power to veto bills and to command the state National Guard.
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The governor has the sole power to veto bills, subject to a two-thirds legislative override, and to command the state National Guard.
  
 
Other duties and privileges of the office include:
 
Other duties and privileges of the office include:
  
*
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* Adjourning the legislature when the two chambers cannot agree to do so, prolonging and convening the legislature for extraordinary reasons, not to exceed 90 days, and moving the meeting place of the legislature
 +
 
 +
* Making all appointments for "judicial officers, the attorney general, and all officers of the navy, and general and field officers of the militia" with the approval of the General Court. 
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* Granting pardons, not extending to impeachment
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* Granting a warrant, with the advice and consent of the Council, before the Treasury may issue any money
  
 
==Compensation==
 
==Compensation==
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:: ''See also: [[Comparison of gubernatorial salaries]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[Comparison of gubernatorial salaries]]''
  
The governor's salary is legally fixed and may not be raised or decreased effective during the current term.
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The governor's salary is legally fixed and may not be raised or decreased effective during the current term. Under Article 58:
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{| style="width:60%; background:#F08080; margin-top:.1em; border:.5px solid #cccccc; solid;"
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|color:#000"|
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|-
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|
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''The governor and council shall be compensated for their services, from time to time, by such grants as the general courts shall think reasonable.''
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|}
  
 
As of 2010, the Governor of New Hampshire is paid [http://sunshinereview.org/index.php/New_Hampshire_state_government_salary $113,834 a year], the 35th highest gubernatorial salary in America.
 
As of 2010, the Governor of New Hampshire is paid [http://sunshinereview.org/index.php/New_Hampshire_state_government_salary $113,834 a year], the 35th highest gubernatorial salary in America.
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==External links==
 
==External links==
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{{seosubmit}}
 
*[http://www.governor.nh.gov/ ''Office of the New Hampshire Governor'']
 
*[http://www.governor.nh.gov/ ''Office of the New Hampshire Governor'']
  
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*[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Hampshire_Governor ''Wikipedia'', New Hampshire Governor]
 
*[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Hampshire_Governor ''Wikipedia'', New Hampshire Governor]
 
<small>Portions of this article were adapted from [http://www.wikipedia.org Wikipedia].</small>
 
<small>Portions of this article were adapted from [http://www.wikipedia.org Wikipedia].</small>
 
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{{reflist}}
 
{{Current governors}}
 
{{Current governors}}
 
{{New Hampshire}}
 
{{New Hampshire}}
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[[Category:Offices of the American governors]]
 
[[Category:Offices of the American governors]]
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[[Category:New Hampshire state executive offices]]

Revision as of 08:12, 20 September 2011

New Hampshire

New Hampshire State Executives
Governor
Secretary of StateAttorney General
Treasurer
Commissioner of Education

Agriculture Commissioner
Insurance Commissioner
Labor Commissioner
Director of Fish & Game
Public Utilities Commission
The Governor of the State of New Hampshire is an elected Constitutional officer, the head of the Executive branch, and the highest state office in New Hampshire. The Governor is popularly elected every two years by a plurality and has no term limit.

Current officer

The 90th and current governor of New Hampshire is John Lynch, a Democrat first elected in 2004 and re-elected three more times since then. In September 2011, Lynch announced he would not seek an additional term in office, recognizing "democracy demands periodic change. To refresh and revive itself, democracy needs new leaders and new ideas."[1]

Authority

The state Constitution addresses the office of the governor in Articles 41-59, Executive Power.

Under Article 41:

There shall be a supreme executive magistrate, who shall be styled the Governor of the State of New Hampshire, and whose title shall be His Excellency. The executive power of the state is vested in the governor.

Qualifications

Governors
GovernorsLogo.jpg
Current Governors
Gubernatorial Elections
20142013201220112010
Current Lt. Governors
Lt. Governor Elections
20142013201220112010
Breaking news

Candidates for governor must:

  • be at east 30 years old
  • have been a resident of New Hampshire for at least seven years on the day of the election

Elections

New Hampshire is one of only two states that elects governors biennially, that is, each even-numbered year. For New Hampshire, 2010, 2012, 2014, and 2016 are all gubernatorial election years. Legally, the gubernatorial inauguration is always set for the first Wednesday following the first Tuesday in the January following an election. Thus, January 12, 2011, January 2, 2013, and January 14, 2015 are inaugural days.

To win the governorship, a candidate must have a plurality of votes; if no candidate does, then the legislature shall convene and choose a winning candidate from the two highest vote receivers.

Vacancies

See also: How gubernatorial vacancies are filled

Details of vacancy appointments are addressed under Executive Power, Section 49 and 49a.

The state of New Hampshire lacks an office of the Lieutenant Governor, making the President of the Senate the first officer in the line of succession. At any time she is mentally or physically unable to discharge the office, she shall notify the Secretary of State and the Senate President in writing. By notifying the same two officers again, she shall resume the office.

The Attorney General and a majority of the Executive Council may, when they believe the Governor is mentally or physically unfit to serve but it unable or unwilling to take an absence from the office, petition the Supreme Court for a declaratory judgment. The justices of the Court shall hear the petition and shall also be in charge of considering a petition to consider declaring the Governor able to resume his duties.

If, either by written declaration or court judgment, the Governor has been absent for six months, the General Court may, by concurrent resolution, declare the office vacant. Similarly, if a Governor-elect fails to take office for any reason other than death or resignation, the Court may declare the office vacant six months after the inauguration date.

Whatever the reason for the vacancy, if more than one year remains in the current term, a special election shall be held.

After the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the House, the Secretary of State, and the State Treasurer are next in the line of succession.

Whoever is filling the office shall have the title of "Acting Governor" and shall have the full powers of the office. She or he receives compensation equal to that of an elected governor and takes no additional oath of office. The Acting Governor does not resign the office she was elected to and is instead suspended from those duties while serving as governor.

Duties

New Hampshire

Unlike in many other states in which Executive Councils are merely advisory, the Executive Council of New Hampshire has a strong check on the governor's power. The five-member Executive Council has a veto over many actions of the governor. Under Article 47, both the Governor and the Council "have a negative" on one another.

Together, the governor and Executive Council approve contracts with a value of $5,000 or more, approve pardons, and appoint the directors and commissioners, judges, the attorney general and officers in the National Guard.

The governor has the sole power to veto bills, subject to a two-thirds legislative override, and to command the state National Guard.

Other duties and privileges of the office include:

  • Adjourning the legislature when the two chambers cannot agree to do so, prolonging and convening the legislature for extraordinary reasons, not to exceed 90 days, and moving the meeting place of the legislature
  • Making all appointments for "judicial officers, the attorney general, and all officers of the navy, and general and field officers of the militia" with the approval of the General Court.
  • Granting pardons, not extending to impeachment
  • Granting a warrant, with the advice and consent of the Council, before the Treasury may issue any money

Compensation

See also: Comparison of gubernatorial salaries

The governor's salary is legally fixed and may not be raised or decreased effective during the current term. Under Article 58:

The governor and council shall be compensated for their services, from time to time, by such grants as the general courts shall think reasonable.

As of 2010, the Governor of New Hampshire is paid $113,834 a year, the 35th highest gubernatorial salary in America.

Contact information

Office of the Governor
State House
25 Capitol Street
Concord, NH 03301
Phone:603-271-2121
Fax:603-271-7680

See also

External links

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Suggest a link

References

Portions of this article were adapted from Wikipedia.