Difference between revisions of "Governor of North Dakota"

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==Compensation==
 
==Compensation==
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:: ''See also: [[Comparison of gubernatorial salaries]]''
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As of 2010, the Governor of North Dakota is paid [http://sunshinereview.org/index.php/North_Dakota_state_government_salary $105,036 a year], the 43rd highest gubernatorial salary in America.
  
 
==Contact information==
 
==Contact information==

Revision as of 00:47, 10 April 2011

Governors
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Current Governors
Gubernatorial Elections
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Current Lt. Governors
Lt. Governor Elections
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Breaking news
The Governor of the State of North Dakota is an elected Constitutional officer, the head of the Executive branch, and the highest state office in North Dakota. The Governor is popularly elected every four years by a plurality and is has no term limit.

Current officer

The 32nd and current governor is Jack Dalrymple, a Republican appointed in December 2010 after John Hoeven resigned to become a U.S. Senator.

His wife, Betsy Wood, is the First Lady of North Dakota.

Authority

The state Constitution addresses the office of the governor in Article V, the Executive Department.

Under Article V, Section I:

The executive power is vested in the governor...

Requirements

A candidate for governor must be:

  • at least 30 years old
  • a resident of North Dakota for at least five years
  • a duly registered elector of North Dakota

Election

North Dakota elects governors in the Presidential elections, that is, in leap years. For North Dakota, 2004, 2008, 2012, and 2016 are all gubernatorial election years. Legally, the gubernatorial inauguration is always set for the fifteenth of December following an election. Thus, December 15, 2012 and December 15, 2016 are inaugural days.

If two candidates are tied after the general election, a special joint session of the legislature shall cast ballots to choose among the two highest vote getters.

Vacancies

See also: How gubernatorial vacancies are filled

Details of vacancies are addressed under Article V, Section 11.

The Lieutenant Governor succeeds to the office whenever the office is vacant for any reason.

If the Lieutenant Governor is unable to serve, the Secretary of State serves as Acting Governor until the vacancy is filled or until the governor's disability is removed.

Additionally, under Article V, Section 10, and Governor who asks for or accepts any bribe automatically forfeits the office.

Duties

North Dakota

The governor has the power to sign and veto laws, and to call the Legislative Assembly into emergency session. The governor is also chairman of the North Dakota Industrial Commission. The governor is responsible for seeing that the state's laws are upheld.

The governor is commander-in-chief of the state's military forces, except when they are called into the service of the United States. The governor may prescribe the duties of the lieutenant governor. Additionally, the governor is responsible for presenting the state budget to the legislative assembly.

Other duties and privileges of the office include:

  • Seeing that business of the state is "well administered" (§ 7)
  • Addressing the legislature periodically on the state of the North Dakota and making recommendations for legislation (§ 7)
  • Granting reprieves, pardons, and commutations and delegating that power within the confines of the law (§ 7)
  • Making vacancy appointments to all offices not otherwise provided for, with the consent of the Senate (§ 8)
  • Vetoing bills, subject to a two-thirds legislative override (§ 9)

Compensation

See also: Comparison of gubernatorial salaries

As of 2010, the Governor of North Dakota is paid $105,036 a year, the 43rd highest gubernatorial salary in America.

Contact information

Office of the Governor
State of North Dakota
600 East Boulevard Avenue
Bismarck, North Dakota 58505-0001
Phone:701.328.2200
Fax:701.328.2205
E-Mail:governor@nd.gov

See also

External links

References