Difference between revisions of "Governor of South Carolina"

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As of 2010, the Governor of South Carolina is paid [http://sunshinereview.org/index.php/South_Carolina_state_government_salary $106,078 a year], the 38th highest gubernatorial salary in America.
 
As of 2010, the Governor of South Carolina is paid [http://sunshinereview.org/index.php/South_Carolina_state_government_salary $106,078 a year], the 38th highest gubernatorial salary in America.
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==Historical officeholders==
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There have been 91 governors of South Carolina since 1776. Of the 91 officeholders, 56 were Democrats, 16 were Democratic-Republicans, 8 were Republican, 5 had no party affiliation, 5 were Federalists, and 1 was Conservative.<ref>[http://www.nga.org/cms/home/governors/past-governors-bios/page_south_carolina.default.html?beginebae55b3-b0ac-48de-bd55-e4f33b546c51=0&&pagesizeebae55b3-b0ac-48de-bd55-e4f33b546c51=100 ''National Governors Association,'' " Former governors of South Carolina,"  accessed June 17, 2013]</ref>
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{| class="wikitable collapsible collapsed" width="500px" style="text-align:center;"
 +
|-
 +
! colspan="6" style="background-color:#008000; color: white;" |List of Former Officeholders from 1776-Present
 +
|-
 +
!#
 +
! Name
 +
! Tenure
 +
! Party
 +
|-
 +
| 1||John Rutledge ||1776 - 1778||''No Party''
 +
|-
 +
| 2||Rawlins Lowndes ||1778 - 1779||''No Party''
 +
|-
 +
| 3||John Rutledge ||1779 - 1782||''No Party''
 +
|-
 +
| 4||John Mathews ||1782 - 1783||''No Party''
 +
|-
 +
| 5||Benjamin Guerard ||1783 - 1785||''No Party''
 +
|-
 +
| 6||William Moultrie ||1785 - 1787||Federalist
 +
|-
 +
| 7||Thomas Pinckney ||1787 - 1789||Federalist
 +
|-
 +
| 8||Charles Pinckney ||1789 - 1792||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 9||William Moultrie ||1792 – 1794||Federalist
 +
|-
 +
| 10||Arnoldus Vandershorst ||1794 - 1796||Federalist
 +
|-
 +
| 11||Charles Pinckney ||1796 - 1798||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 12||Edward Rutledge ||1798 - 1800||Federalist
 +
|-
 +
| 13||John Drayton ||1800 - 1802||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 14||James Burchill Richardson ||1802 - 1804||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 15||Paul Hamilton ||1804 - 1806||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 16||Charles Pinckney ||1806 - 1808||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 17||John Drayton ||1808 - 1810||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 18||Henry Middleton ||1810 - 1812||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 19||Joseph Alston ||1812 - 1814||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 20||David Rogerson Williams ||1814 - 1816||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 21||Andrew Pickens ||1816 - 1818||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 22||Geddes John ||1818 - 1820||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 23||Thomas Bennett ||1820 - 1822||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 24||John Lyde Wilson ||1822 - 1824||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 25||Richard Irvine Manning ||1824 - 1826||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 26||John Taylor ||1826 - 1828||Democratic-Republican
 +
|-
 +
| 27||Stephen Decatur Miller ||1828 - 1830||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 28||James Jr. Hamilton ||1830 - 1832||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 29||Robert Young Hayne ||1832 - 1834||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 30||George McDuffie ||1834 - 1836||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 31||Pierce Mason Butler ||1836 - 1838||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 32||Patrick Noble ||1838 - 1840||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 33||Barnabas Kelet Henagan ||1840 - 1840||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 34||John Peter Richardson II ||1840 - 1842||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 35||James Henry Hammond ||1842 - 1844||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 36||William Aiken ||1844 - 1846||{{blue dot}}
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|-
 +
| 37||David Johnson ||1846 - 1848||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 38||Whitemarsh Benjamin Seabrook ||1848 - 1850||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 39||John Hugh Means ||1850 - 1852||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 40||John Laurence Manning ||1852 - 1854||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 41||James Hopkins Adams ||1854 - 1856||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 42||Robert Francis Withers Allston ||1856 - 1858||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 43||William Henry Gist ||1858 - 1860||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 44||Francis Wilkinson Pickens ||1860 - 1862||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 45||Milledge Luke Bonham ||1862 - 1864||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 46||Andrew Gordon MacGrath ||1864 - 1865||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 47||Benjamin Franklin Perry ||1865 - 1865||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 48||James Lawrence Orr ||1865 - 1868||Conservative
 +
|-
 +
| -||Edward R. S. Canby ||1868 - 1868||-
 +
|-
 +
| 49||Robert Kingston Scott ||1868 - 1872||{{red dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 50||Franklin J. Moses ||1872 - 1874||{{red dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 51||Daniel Henry Chamberlain ||1874 - 1876||{{red dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 52||Wade Hampton III ||1876 - 1879||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 53||William Dunlap Simpson ||1879 - 1880||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 54||Thomas Bothwell Jeter ||1880 - 1880||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 55||Johnson Hagood ||1880 - 1882||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 56||Hugh Smith Thompson ||1882 - 1886||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 57||John Calhoun Sheppard ||1886 - 1886||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 58||John Peter Richardson ||1886 - 1890||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 59||Benjamin Ryan Tillman ||1890 - 1894||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 60||John Gary Evans ||1894 - 1897||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 61||William Haselden Ellerbe ||1897 - 1899||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 62||Miles Benjamin McSweeney ||1899 - 1903||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 63||Duncan Clinch Heyward ||1903 - 1907||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 64||Martin Frederick Ansel ||1907 - 1911||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 65||Coleman Livingston Blease ||1911 - 1915||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 66||Charles A. Smith ||1915 - 1915||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 67||Richard Irvine Manning III ||1915 - 1919||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 68||Robert Archer Cooper ||1919 - 1922||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 69||Wilson Godfrey Harvey ||1922 - 1923||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 70||Thomas Gordon McLeod ||1923 - 1927||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 71||John Gardiner Richards ||1927 - 1931||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 72||Ibra Charles Blackwood ||1931 - 1935||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 73||Olin De Witt Talmadge Johnston ||1935 - 1939||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 74||Burnet Rhett Maybank ||1939 - 1941||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 75||Joseph Emile Harley ||1941 - 1942||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 76||Richard Manning Jeffries ||1942 - 1943||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 77||Ransome Judson Williams ||1945 - 1947||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 78||James Strom Thurmond ||1947 - 1951||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 79||James Francis Byrnes ||1951 - 1955||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 80||George Bell Timmerman ||1955 - 1959||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 81||Ernest Frederick Hollings ||1959 - 1963||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 82||Donald Stuart Russell ||1963 - 1965||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 83||Robert Evander McNair ||1965 - 1971||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 84||John Carl West ||1971 - 1975||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 85||James Burrows Edwards ||1975 - 1979||{{red dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 86||Richard Wilson Riley ||1979 - 1987||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 87||Carroll A. Campbell ||1987 - 1995||{{red dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 88||David M. Beasley ||1995 - 1999||{{red dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 89||Jim Hodges ||1999 - 2003||{{blue dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 90||[[Mark Sanford]]||2003 - 2011||{{red dot}}
 +
|-
 +
| 91||[[Nikki Haley]]||2011 – present||{{red dot}}
 +
|}
  
 
==History==
 
==History==

Revision as of 10:28, 17 June 2013

South Carolina Governor
General information
Office Type:  Partisan
Office website:  Official Link
2012-2013 FY Budget:  $1,910,705
Term limits:  Two consecutive terms
Structure
Length of term:   4 years
Authority:   South Carolina Constitution, Article IV, Section I
Selection Method:  Elected
Current Officeholder

SCNikkiHaileyPicture.png
Name:  Nikki Haley
Officeholder Party:  Republican
Assumed office:  January 12, 2011
Compensation:  $106,078
Elections
Next election:  November 4, 2014
Last election:  November 2, 2010
Other South Carolina Executive Offices
GovernorLieutenant GovernorSecretary of StateComptrollerAttorney GeneralTreasurerAuditorAdjutant GeneralInspector GeneralSuperintendent of EducationAgriculture CommissionerInsurance CommissionerNatural Resources CommissionerLabor CommissionerPublic Service Commission
The Governor of the State of South Carolina is an elected Constitutional officer, the head of the Executive branch, and the highest state office in South Carolina. The Governor is popularly elected every four years by a plurality and is limited to two consecutive terms.

As of May 2013, South Carolina is one of 24 Republican state government trifectas.

Current officer

The 116th and current governor is Nikki Haley, a Republican elected in 2010.

Authority

The state Constitution addresses the office of the governor in Article IV, the Executive Department.

Under Article IV, Section I:

The supreme executive authority of this State shall be vested in a Chief Magistrate, who shall be styled "The Governor of the State of South Carolina."

Qualifications

Governors
GovernorsLogo.jpg
Current Governors
Gubernatorial Elections
20142013201220112010
Current Lt. Governors
Lt. Governor Elections
20142013201220112010
Breaking news

A candidate for the governor must be:

  • at least 30 years old
  • a citizen of the United States
  • a resident of South Carolina for at least five years
  • believe in the existence of the "Supreme Being"

Additionally, the Governor may not hold office or a commission under any other power, excepting that of a militia.

Elections

South Carolina elects governors in the midterm elections, that is, even years that are not Presidential election years. For South Carolina, 2006, 2010, 2014, and 2018 are all gubernatorial election years. Legally, the gubernatorial inauguration is always set for the first Wednesday following the second Tuesday in the January following an election. Thus, January 12, 2011 and January 14, 2015 are inaugural days.

If there is a tie, a joint session of the legislature shall cast ballots to choose the governor from the two highest vote getters.

Term limits

See also: States with gubernatorial term limits

South Carolina governors are restricted to two consecutive terms in office, after which they must wait one term before being eligible to run again.

South Carolina Constitution, Article IV, Section 3

No person shall be elected Governor for more than two successive terms.

Partisan composition

The chart below shows the partisan breakdown of South Carolina State Governors from 1992-2013.
Governor of South Carolina Partisanship.PNG

Vacancies

See also: How gubernatorial vacancies are filled

Details of vacancy appointments are addressed under Article IV, Sections 6 and 7 and under Article IV, Section 11 and 12

If a Governor-elect dies or declines to take office, the Lieutenant Governor-elect shall take office as the Governor and serve the full term. If the Governor-elect is temporarily unable to take the oath, the Lieutenant Governor-elect takes office as Acting Governor only until the Governor-elect is able to take the oath.

If both the Governor-elect and the Lieutenant Governor-elect are both unable to take office, the gubernatorial powers devolve through the line of succession, subject to the dual-office holding provision of the Constitution.

The Lieutenant Governor is Acting Governor and has the powers to act in an emergency in the event of the temporary absence or disability of the Governor. The Governor declares her temporary or permanent disability to discharge the office in writing to the President Pro Tem of the Senate and the Speaker of the House. In the case of a temporary disability, she also declares her ability to resume the office in the same manner.

If a majority of the officers serving as Attorney General, the Secretary of State, the Comptroller General and the State Treasurer transmit, in writing, a declaration to the Senate President Pro Tem and the Speaker of the House, that the Governor is unfit the serve, the Lieutenant Governor shall immediately become the Acting Governor.

The Governor then may declare his declaration to the General Assembly that no such inability exists and will resume the office unless a majority of the members of the Assembly transmit their written declaration to the contrary to the President Pro Tem and the Senate. In that case, the Assembly has 21 days, excluding Sundays, to convene and vote on the issue, requiring a two-thirds vote to remove the Governor.

The Lieutenant Governor also becomes the Acting Governor in the event of the death, resignation, or removal of the Governor, and act as Governor during an impeachment until a judgment is rendered in the impeachment trial.

Duties

Under the South Carolina Constitution, the Governor is also the head of government, serving as the chief executive of the South Carolina executive branch. The governor is the ex officio Commander-in-Chief of the state National Guard when not called into federal use and of the state's unorganized militia (§ 13).

The governor's responsibilities include making yearly "State of the State" addresses to the South Carolina General Assembly, submitting an executive state budget and ensuring that state laws are enforced (§ 15).

Other duties and privileges of the office include:

  • Commuting death sentences to life imprisonment (§ 14); all other clemency matters are regulated by statute
  • Requiring written reports from the officers of any agency or institute in the executive branch on any aspect of their duties (§ 17)
  • Periodically addressing the General Assembly on the state of the state and making recommendations concerning legislation (§ 18)
  • Convening special session of the legislation and, when the legislature is five days without a quorum, adjourning them (§ 19)
  • Residing at the official Governor's Residence, the South Carolina Executive Mansion, except in cases of epidemic, natural disaster, or war (§ 20)
  • Vetoing bills and joint resolutions, subject to a two-thirds legislative override (§ 21)

State budget

The budget for the Governor's Office (Executive Control of State only) in Fiscal Year 2012-2013 was $1,910,705.[1]

Compensation

See also: Comparison of gubernatorial salaries

As of 2010, the Governor of South Carolina is paid $106,078 a year, the 38th highest gubernatorial salary in America.

Historical officeholders

There have been 91 governors of South Carolina since 1776. Of the 91 officeholders, 56 were Democrats, 16 were Democratic-Republicans, 8 were Republican, 5 had no party affiliation, 5 were Federalists, and 1 was Conservative.[2]

History

Partisan balance 1992-2013

Who Runs the States Project
See also: Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States and Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States, South Carolina’’
Partisan breakdown of the South Carolina governorship from 1992-2013

From 1992-2013, in South Carolina there were Democratic governors in office for four years while there were Republican governors in office for 18 years, including the last 11. South Carolina is one of eight states that were run by a Republican governor for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. South Carolina was under Republican trifectas for the final 11 years of the study.

Across the country, there were 493 years of Democratic governors (44.82%) and 586 years of Republican governors (53.27%) from 1992-2013.

Over the course of the 22-year study, state governments became increasingly more partisan. At the outset of the study period (1992), 18 of the 49 states with partisan legislatures had single-party trifectas and 31 states had divided governments. In 2013, only 13 states have divided governments, while single-party trifectas held sway in 36 states, the most in the 22 years studied.

The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Office of the Governor of South Carolina, the South Carolina State Senate and the South Carolina House of Representatives from 1992-2013. Partisan composition of South Carolina state government(1992-2013).PNG

Contact information

Office of the Governor
P.O. Box 12267
Columbia, SC 29211
Phone:803-734-2100
Fax:803-734-5167

See also

External links

Light Bulb Icon.svg.png
Suggest a link

References