Difference between revisions of "Governor of Vermont"

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As of 2010, the Governor of Vermont  is paid [http://sunshinereview.org/index.php/Vermont_state_government_salary $142,542 a year], the 15th highest gubernatorial salary in America.
 
As of 2010, the Governor of Vermont  is paid [http://sunshinereview.org/index.php/Vermont_state_government_salary $142,542 a year], the 15th highest gubernatorial salary in America.
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==Historical officeholders==
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There have been 81 governors of Vermont since 1791. (The first two officeholders listed in the chart below served as governor prior to statehood.) Of the 81 officeholders, 53 were Republican, 9 were Whigs, 7 were Democrats, 4 were Democratic-Republicans, 3 were Federalists, 2 had no party, 1 was a Jeffersonian Republican, 1 was Anti-Masonic, and 1 was Whig/Republican.<ref>[http://www.nga.org/cms/home/governors/past-governors-bios/page_vermont.default.html?begin053a8494-5c7f-4b72-9867-ae4bc0f6dbe1=0&&pagesize053a8494-5c7f-4b72-9867-ae4bc0f6dbe1=100 ''National Governors Association,'' " Former Governors of Vermont,"  accessed June 14, 2013] </ref>
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{| class="wikitable collapsible collapsed" width="500px" style="text-align:center;"
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|-
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! colspan="6" style="background-color:#008000; color: white;" |List of Former Officeholders from 1778-Present
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|-
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!#
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! Name
 +
! Tenure
 +
! Party
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|-
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| -||Thomas Chittenden ||1778 - 1789||''No Party''
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|-
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| -||Moses Robinson ||1789 - 1790||''No Party''
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|-
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| 1||Thomas Chittenden ||1790 – 1797||''No Party''
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|-
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| 2||Paul Brigham ||1797 - 1797||''No Party''
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|-
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| 3||Isaac Tichenor ||1797 - 1807||Federalist
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|-
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| 4||Israel Smith ||1807 - 1808|| Jeffersonian Republican
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|-
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| 5||Isaac Tichenor ||1808 – 1809|| Federalist
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|-
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| 6||Jonas Galusha ||1809 - 1813|| Democratic-Republican
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|-
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| 7||Martin Chittenden ||1813 - 1815||Federalist
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|-
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| 8||Jonas Galusha ||1815 – 1820||Democratic-Republican
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|-
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| 9||Richard Skinner ||1820 - 1823||Democratic-Republican
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|-
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| 10||Cornelius P. Van Ness ||1823 - 1826||Democratic-Republican
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|-
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| 11||Ezra Butler ||1826 - 1828||{{blue dot}}
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|-
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| 12||Samuel C. Crafts ||1828 - 1831||Whig
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|-
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| 13||William A. Palmer ||1831 - 1835||Anti-Masonic
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|-
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| 14||Silas H. Jension ||1835 - 1841||Whig
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|-
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| 15||Charles Paine ||1841 - 1843||Whig
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|-
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| 16||John Mattocks ||1843 - 1844||Whig
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|-
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| 17||William Slade ||1844 - 1846||Whig
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|-
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| 18||Horace Eaton ||1846 - 1848||Whig
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|-
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| 19||Carlos Coolidge ||1848 - 1850||Whig
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|-
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| 20||Charles Kilborn Williams ||1850 - 1852||Whig
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|-
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| 21||Erastus Fairbanks ||1852 - 1853||Whig
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|-
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| 22||John Staniford Robinson ||1853 - 1854||{{blue dot}}
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|-
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| 23||Stephen Royce ||1854 - 1856||Whig/Republican
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|-
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| 24||Ryland Fletcher ||1856 - 1858||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 25||Hiland Hall ||1858 - 1860||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 26||Erastus Fairbanks ||1860 – 1861||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 27||Frederick Holbrook ||1861 - 1863||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 28||John Gregory Smith ||1863 - 1865||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 29||Paul Dillingham ||1865 - 1867||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 30||John B. Page ||1867 - 1869||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 31||Peter T. Washburn ||1869 - 1870||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 32||George Whitman Hendee ||1870 - 1870||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 33||John Wolcott Stewart ||1870 - 1872||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 34||Julius Converse ||1872 - 1874||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 35||Asahel Peck ||1874 - 1876||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 36||Horace Fairbanks ||1876 - 1878||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 37||Redfield Proctor ||1878 - 1880||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 38||Roswell Farnham ||1880 - 1882||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 39||John Lester Barstow ||1882 - 1884||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 40||Samuel E. Pingree ||1884 - 1886||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 41||Ebenezer Jolls Ormsbee ||1886 - 1888||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 42||William Paul Dillingham ||1888 - 1890||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 43||Carroll Smalley Page ||1890 - 1892||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 44||Levi Knight Fuller ||1892 - 1894||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 45||Urban Andrain Woodbury ||1894 - 1896||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 46||Josiah Grout ||1896 - 1898||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 47||Edward Curtis Smith ||1898 - 1900||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 48||William W. Stickney ||1900 - 1902||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 49||John Griffith McCullough ||1902 - 1904||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 50||Charles James Bell ||1904 - 1906||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 51||Fletcher Dutton Proctor ||1906 - 1908||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 52||George Prouty ||1908 - 1910||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 53||John Abner Mead ||1910 - 1912||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 54||Allen M. Fletcher ||1912 - 1915||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 55||Charles W. Gates ||1915 - 1917||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 56||Horace French Graham ||1917 - 1919||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 57||Percival W. Clement ||1919 - 1921||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 58||James Hartness ||1921 - 1923||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 59||Redfield Proctor ||1923 - 1925||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 60||Franklin Swift Billings ||1925 - 1927||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 61||John Eliakim Weeks ||1927 - 1931||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 62||Stanley Calef Wilson ||1931 - 1935||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 63||Charles Manley Smith ||1935 - 1937||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 64||George D. Aiken ||1937 - 1941||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 65||William H. Wills ||1941 - 1945||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 66||Mortimer R. Proctor ||1945 - 1947||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 67||Ernest William Gibson ||1947 - 1950||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 68||Harold John Arthur ||1950 - 1951||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 69||Lee Emerson ||1951 - 1955||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 70||Joseph Blaine Johnson ||1955 - 1959||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 71||Robert T. Stafford ||1959 - 1961||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 72||F. Ray Keyser ||1961 - 1963||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 73||Philip Henderson Hoff ||1963 - 1969||{{blue dot}}
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|-
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| 74||Reane C. Davis ||1969 - 1973||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 75||Thomas P. Salmon ||1973 - 1977||{{blue dot}}
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|-
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| 76||Richard A. Snelling ||1977 - 1985||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 77||Madeleine M. Kunin ||1985 - 1991||{{blue dot}}
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|-
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| 78||Richard A. Snelling ||1991 – 1991||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 79||Howard Dean ||1991 - 2003||{{blue dot}}
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|-
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| 80||[[Jim Douglas]] ||2003 - 2011||{{red dot}}
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|-
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| 81||[[Peter Shumlin]]||2011 - present||{{blue dot}}
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|}
  
 
==Contact information==
 
==Contact information==

Revision as of 12:59, 14 June 2013

Vermont Governor
General information
Office Type:  Partisan
Office website:  Official Link
2010 FY Budget:  $1,603,815
Term limits:  None
Structure
Length of term:   2 years
Authority:  Vermont Constitution, Chapter II, Sections 1
Selection Method:  Elected
Current Officeholder

Shumlin.jpg
Name:  Peter Shumlin
Officeholder Party:  Democratic
Assumed office:  January 6, 2011
Compensation:  $142,542
Elections
Next election:  November 4, 2014
Last election:  November 6, 2012
Other Vermont Executive Offices
GovernorLieutenant GovernorSecretary of StateAttorney GeneralTreasurerAuditorSuperintendent of EducationAgriculture CommissionerInsurance CommissionerNatural Resources CommissionerLabor CommissionerPublic Service Board
The Governor of the Commonwealth of Vermont is an elected Constitutional officer, the head of the Executive branch, and the highest state office in Vermont. The Governor is popularly elected every two years by a plurality and has no term limit.[1]

As of May 2013, Vermont is one of 13 Democratic state government trifectas.

Current officeholder

The 81st and current governor is Peter Shumlin, a Democrat elected in 2010.[2]

Authority

The state Constitution addresses the office of the governor in both Chapter II, Sections 1-5, the Delegations and Distribution of Powers and Chapter II, Sections 20-27, Executive Department.

Under Section I:

The Commonwealth or State of Vermont shall be governed by a Governor...

Additionally, under Section I:

The Supreme Executive power shall be exercised by a Governor...

Qualifications

A candidate for governor must be:

  • a resident of Vermont for at least four years on the day of the election

Governors may not hold any legislative office or any other Constitutional office. Excepting positions in military reserves, they also may not hold any office under the federal government. Nor is the Governor eligible for any appointed position made by any branch of the Vermont government.

Elections

Vermont's Constitution address gubernatorial elections not in the section on the Executive but in Chapter II, Section 43-55, Elections; Officers; Terms of Office.

Vermont is one of only two states that elects governors biennially, that is, each even-numbered year. For Vermont, 2010, 2012, 2014, and 2016 are all gubernatorial election years. Legally, the gubernatorial inauguration is always set for the first Thursday following the first Tuesday in the January following an election. Thus, January 6, 2011, January 3, 2013, and January 8, 2015 are inaugural days.

If the office of the Governor is not filled in the election, a joint session of the legislature shall cast ballots to choose among three candidates.

2012

See also: Vermont gubernatorial election, 2012
Governor of Vermont General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngPeter Shumlin Incumbent 57.8% 170,749
     Republican Randy Brock 37.6% 110,940
     Independent Emily Peyton 2% 5,868
     United States Marijuana Cris Ericson 1.9% 5,583
     Liberty Union Dave Eagle 0.4% 1,303
     Independent Write-in 0.3% 969
Total Votes 295,412
Election Results via Vermont Secretary of State.


Term limits

See also: States with gubernatorial term limits

Vermont governors do not face any term limits.

Partisan composition

The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Office of the Governor of Vermont from 1992-2013.

Governor of Vermont Partisanship.PNG

Vacancies

See also: How gubernatorial vacancies are filled

Details of vacancy appointments are addressed under Chapter II, Section 24

The Lieutenant Governor becomes Governor anytime the elected Governor is absent or unable to discharge the office and anytime the office is vacant.

The legislature is Constitutionally required to draft laws providing for the line of succession if the Lieutenant Governor's office is also vacant.

Duties

Vermont

Vermont's Governor is charged to uphold and execute all laws, expedite legislative business as needed (§ 20).

According to the state Constitution the Governor has limited powers to grant pardons and reprieves and the power to call special sessions of the General Assembly when necessary (§ 20).

The governor is the commander-in-chief of the naval and militia forces, but may directly command those forced unless permitted to do so by the Senate (§ 20).

Other duties and privileges of the office include:

  • Commissioning all officers of the state (§ 20)
  • Making all appointments not otherwise provided for and making interim appointments to all vacant offices until the legal procedure for filling the office is performed (§ 20)
  • Granting reprieves in all cases except treason and granting pardons in all cases except impeachment (§ 200
  • Granting licenses as permitted by law (§ 20)
  • Drawing upon the Treasury for sums already appropriated by the General Assembly (§ 20)
  • Laying embargoes for up to 30 days when the legislature is in recess (§ 20)
  • Commissioning a Secretary of Military and Civil Affairs at her pleasure. Such an officer serves at the Governor's pleasure (§ 21)
  • Sealing and signing all commissions made by the state of Vermont (§ 22)
  • Keeping and using "The Great Seal of the State of Vermont" (§ 22)
  • Appointing a Treasurer when the office become vacant (§ 24)

State budget

The budget for the Governor's Office in Fiscal Year 2010 was $1,603,815.[3]

Compensation

See also: Comparison of gubernatorial salaries and Compensation of state executive officers

2012

In 2012, the Governor of Vermont was paid an estimated $142,542. This figure comes from the Council of State Governments.

2010

As of 2010, the Governor of Vermont is paid $142,542 a year, the 15th highest gubernatorial salary in America.

Historical officeholders

There have been 81 governors of Vermont since 1791. (The first two officeholders listed in the chart below served as governor prior to statehood.) Of the 81 officeholders, 53 were Republican, 9 were Whigs, 7 were Democrats, 4 were Democratic-Republicans, 3 were Federalists, 2 had no party, 1 was a Jeffersonian Republican, 1 was Anti-Masonic, and 1 was Whig/Republican.[4]

Contact information

Mailing address:[5]
109 State Street, Pavilion
Montpelier, VT 05609-0101
Phone: 802-828-3333
Fax: 802-828-3339

History

Partisan balance 1992-2013

Who Runs the States Project
See also: Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States and Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States, Vermont
Partisan breakdown of the Vermont governorship from 1992-2013

From 1992-2013, in Vermont there were Democratic governors in office for 14 years, including the last three, while there were Republican governors in office for eight years. Vermont was under Democratic trifectas for the last three years of the study period.

Across the country, there were 493 years of Democratic governors (44.82%) and 586 years of Republican governors (53.27%) from 1992-2013.

Over the course of the 22-year study, state governments became increasingly more partisan. At the outset of the study period (1992), 18 of the 49 states with partisan legislatures had single-party trifectas and 31 states had divided governments. In 2013, only 13 states have divided governments, while single-party trifectas held sway in 36 states, the most in the 22 years studied.

The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Office of the Governor of Vermont, the Vermont State Senate and the Vermont House of Representatives from 1992-2013. Partisan composition of Vermont state government(1992-2013).PNG

See also

External links

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Suggest a link

References