Difference between revisions of "Hal Rogers"

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}}{{tnr}}'''Harold Dallas "Hal" Rogers''' (b. December 31, 1937) is a [[Republican]] member of the [[U.S. House of Representatives]] representing [[Kentucky's 5th congressional district]]. Rogers was first elected to the House in 1980.  
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}}{{tnr}}'''Harold Dallas "Hal" Rogers''' (b. December 31, 1937 in Barrier, Kentucky) is a [[Republican]] member of the [[U.S. House of Representatives]] representing [[Kentucky's 5th congressional district]]. Rogers was first elected to the House in 1980.  
  
 
Rogers won re-election in 2012. He defeated [[Kenneth Stepp]] (D) in the November 6, 2012 general election.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/2012-election/map/#/House/2012/ ''Politico'' "2012 Election Map"]</ref>
 
Rogers won re-election in 2012. He defeated [[Kenneth Stepp]] (D) in the November 6, 2012 general election.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/2012-election/map/#/House/2012/ ''Politico'' "2012 Election Map"]</ref>
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|name=Hal Rogers
 
|name=Hal Rogers
 
|party= Republican
 
|party= Republican
|percent=94.8
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|percent=94.8%
|rank=165
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|rank=165th
 
|total=233
 
|total=233
 
|chamber=House
 
|chamber=House

Revision as of 12:35, 1 July 2013

Hal Rogers
Hal Rogers.JPG
U.S. House, Kentucky, District 5
Incumbent
In office
January 3, 1981-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 33
PartyRepublican
PredecessorTim Lee Carter (R)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First electedNovember 4, 1980
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Campaign $$6,129,018
Term limitsN/A
Education
High schoolWayne County High School, Monticello, Kentucky
Bachelor'sUniversity of Kentucky
OtherL.L.B., University of Kentucky School of Law
Military service
Service/branchKentucky and North Carolina Army National Guard
Years of service1956-1963
Personal
BirthdayDecember 31, 1937
Place of birthBarrier, Kentucky
ProfessionAttorney
Net worth$3,820,285
ReligionBaptist
Websites
Office website
Harold Dallas "Hal" Rogers (b. December 31, 1937 in Barrier, Kentucky) is a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives representing Kentucky's 5th congressional district. Rogers was first elected to the House in 1980.

Rogers won re-election in 2012. He defeated Kenneth Stepp (D) in the November 6, 2012 general election.[1]

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Rogers is an average Republican member of Congress, meaning he will vote with the Republican Party on the majority of bills.

Biography

Rogers was born in 1937 in Barrier, Kentucky, and attended high school in Montecello, Kentucky. After attending Western Kentucky University from 1956-1957, he went on to earn both his A.B. and LL.B. from the University of Kentucky in 1962 and 1964, respectively. Rogers also served in the Kentucky and North Carolina Army National Guard from 1956-1963.

Prior to his political career, Rogers worked as an attorney in Kentucky's Pulaski and Rockcastle counties.[2]

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Rogers' professional and political career[2]:

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Rogers serves on the following committees:[3]

2011-2012

Rogers served on the following House committees:[4]

Issues

Presidential preference

2012

See also: Endorsements by state officials of presidential candidates in the 2012 election

Hal Rogers endorsed Mitt Romney in the 2012 presidential election. [5]

Campaign themes

2012

A complete list of Hal Rogers' policy positions can be found at his campaign website.[6]

  • Rogers a co-founder of the Congressional Caucus on Prescription Drug Abuse and supports a "drug-free America." In particular he has focused on prescription painkiller abuse.[7]
  • In the wake of the attack that killed American ambassador to Libya, Chris Stevens, Hal Rogers joined a group of seven congressmen in sending a letter to President Obama requesting more information and expressing concern over his administration's response.[8]
  • Rogers supports protecting social security, but also sees the need for reform.[9]
  • Rogers on Taxes- "There is no question that our current tax system is incredibly complicated and in need of simplification. I support efforts to reform our tax code so that it is easier to understand and comply with the law. At the same time, I believe any reform of the tax code must be fair and should not punish success achieved through hard work and innovation."[10]

Earmarks

A Washington Post investigation in February 2012 revealed that 33 members of Congress helped direct more than $300 million in earmarks to public projects in close proximity to commercial and residential real estate owned by the lawmakers or their family members.[11] According to the report, Rogers has helped earmark $7.1 million to a project that made over a half-mile strip of College Street where Rogers has his residence. The project narrowed parts of the street to slow traffic, buried overhead utilities, rebuilt sidewalks, paved streets and installed new driveway aprons, curbs and decorative lamps. [12]

Specific votes

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Rogers voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was one of 85 Republicans that voted in favor of the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257/167 vote on January 1, 2013.[13]

Elections

2012

See also: Kentucky's 5th congressional district elections, 2012

Rogers won re-election in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Kentucky's 5th District. Rogers won the nomination on the Republican ticket. He ran unopposed in the Republican primary. Candidates wishing to run were initially required to file by the signature filing deadline of January 31, 2012. However because the legislature was unable to complete new redistricting maps on time, the deadline was pushed back one week.[14] The new deadline was February 7.[15] The primary elections took place on May 22, 2012. Rogers defeated Kenneth Stepp (D) in the November 6, 2012 general election.[16]

U.S. House, Kentucky District 5 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHal Rogers Incumbent 77.9% 195,406
     Democratic Kenneth Stepp 22.1% 55,447
Total Votes 250,853
Source: Kentucky Board of Elections "2012 General Election Official Vote Totals"

Media

In the following video, Rogers discusses Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs. His key issue is focusing on prescription pain-killer abuse.


Hal Rogers, "Rogers Examines New Findings for Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs"[17]

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Rogers is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Rogers raised a total of $6,129,018 during that time period. This information was last updated on April 7, 2013.[31]

Hal Rogers's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 U.S. House (Kentucky, District 5) Won $1,535,445
2010 U.S. House (Kentucky, District 5) Won $895,671
2008 U.S. House (Kentucky, District 5) Won $611,926
2006 U.S. House (Kentucky, District 5) Won $1,072,946
2004 U.S. House (Kentucky, District 5) Won $643,981
2002 U.S. House (Kentucky, District 5) Won $721,188
2000 U.S. House (Kentucky, District 5) Won $647,861
Grand Total Raised $6,129,018

2012

Breakdown of the source of Rogers' campaign funds before the 2012 election.

Rogers won re-election to the U.S. House in 2012. During that election cycle, Rogers' campaign committee raised a total of $1,535,445 and spent $1,322,648.[32]

2010

Breakdown of the source of Rogers' campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Rogers won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010. During that re-election cycle, Rogers' campaign committee raised a total of $895,671 and spent $1,098,007.[33]

U.S. House of Representatives, Kentucky's 5th Congressional District, 2010 - Hal Rogers Campaign Contributions
Total Raised $895,671
Total Spent $1,098,007
Total Raised by General Election Opponent $13,012
Total Spent by General Election Opponent $12,502
Top contributors to Hal Rogers's campaign committee
RJ Corman Railroad Group$13,800
American Bankers Assn$10,000
Boeing Co$10,000
Brown-Forman Corp$10,000
CSX Corp$10,000
Top 5 industries that contributed to campaign committee
Defense Electronics$48,500
Lobbyists$45,900
Air Transport$45,750
Defense Aerospace$44,000
Railroads$40,800

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Rogers is a "moderate Republican follower," as of June 18, 2013.[34]

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Rogers missed 406 of 18,894 roll call votes from Jan 1981 to Mar 2013. This amounts to 2.1%, which is better than the median of 2.2% among current congressional representatives as of March 2013.[35]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Rogers paid his congressional staff a total of $919,120 in 2011. He ranked 112th on the list of the highest paid Republican Representative Staff Salaries and he ranked 162nd overall of the lowest paid Representative Staff Salaries in 2011. Overall, Kentucky ranked 10th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[36]

Staff bonuses

According to an analysis by CNN, Rogers is one of nearly 25% of House members who gave their staff bonuses in 2012. Rogers's staff was given an apparent $51,519.86 in bonus money.[37]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, Rogers' net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $1,753,288 and $5,887,283. That averages to $3,820,285, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican Representatives in 2011 of $7,859,232. His average net worth increased by 3.70% from 2010.[38]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, Rogers' net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $1,624,344 and $5,743,339. That averages to $3,683,841.50, which was lower than the average net worth of Republican Representatives in 2010 of $7,561,133.[39]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

2012

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of congress voted in the previous year. Rogers ranked 178th in the conservative rankings in 2012.[40]

2011

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of congress voted in the previous year. Rogers ranked 93rd in the conservative rankings.[41]

Voting with party

2013

Hal Rogers voted with the Republican Party 94.8% of the time, which ranked 165th among the 233 House Republican members as of June 2013.[42]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Hal + Rogers + Kentucky + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

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Personal

Rogers was married to his first wife, Shirley McDowell Rogers, for 37 years until she passed away in 1995. The couple had three (now-grown) children, Anthony, Allison and John. Rogers remarried to Cynthia Doyle Rogers in 1999. [43]

External links

References

  1. Politico "2012 Election Map"
  2. 2.0 2.1 Biographical Guide to Members of Congress "Hal Rogers" Accessed November 15, 2011
  3. CQ.com, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress"
  4. U.S. Congress House Clerk "House of Representatives Committee Assignments" Accessed November 15, 2011
  5. The Hill, "2012 GOP Lawmaker Endorsements for President," retrieved November 23, 2011
  6. Hal Roger's Campaign Website
  7. [1]
  8. Weekly Standard Republicans demand answers from White House on Libya attack
  9. Hal Roger's Campaign Website
  10. Hal Roger's Campaign Website
  11. Washington Post "Congressional earmarks sometimes used to fund projects near lawmakers' properties," February 6, 2012
  12. Washington Post "Mapping the earmarks," February 6, 2012
  13. U.S. House "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.
  14. Courier Press "Judge to rule by Tuesday on Kentucky legislative filing deadline," January 30, 2012
  15. Kentucky.com "Lawmakers move to postpone congressional deadline," January 27, 2012
  16. Politico "2012 Election Map"
  17. YouTube channel
  18. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  19. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  20. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  21. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  22. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  23. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  24. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  25. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  26. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1988," accessed March 28, 2013
  27. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 1986," accessed March 28, 2013
  28. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1984," accessed March 28, 2013
  29. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 1982," accessed March 28, 2013
  30. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 1980," accessed March 28, 2013
  31. Open Secrets "Hal Rogers" Accessed April 7, 2013
  32. [www.opensecrets.org/politicians/elections.php?cycle=2012&cid=N00003473&type=I Open Secrets "Hal Rogers" Accessed May 1, 2013]
  33. Open Secrets "Hal Rogers 2010 Re-Election Cycle," Accessed November 15, 2011
  34. Gov Track "Rogers" Accessed June 18, 2013
  35. GovTrack, "Hal Rogers," Accessed April 1, 2013
  36. LegiStorm "Hal Rogers"
  37. CNN Politics, "Congressional bonuses in a time of cuts," accessed March 8, 2013
  38. OpenSecrets.org, "Rogers (R-KY), 2011"
  39. OpenSecrets.org, "Rogers, (R-Kentucky), 2010"
  40. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," February 28, 2013
  41. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  42. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  43. Official House Site "Biography," Accessed November 15, 2011
Political offices
Preceded by
Tim Lee Carter
U.S. House of Representatives - Kentucky, District 5
1981–present
Succeeded by
'