Hugh Holliman

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Hugh Holliman
81 HughHolliman.jpg
North Carolina House Of Representatives District 81
Former representative
Term in office began
2001
Term in office ended
2011
Political party Democratic
Profession Legislator
Hugh Holliman (b. April 28, 1944) was a Democratic member of the North Carolina House of Representatives. He represented District 81 from 2001-2011. He served as Majority Leader from 2006-2011.

Holliman received his Bachelor of Arts from Elon College in 1966. He owns a printing business. He and his wife, Ellen, have two children, Sue Ellen (deceased) and Bradford.

Committee assignments

  • Subcommittee on Capital

Elections

2010

See also: North Carolina House of Representatives elections, 2010

Holliman was defeated in the November 2, 2010 general election. Republican Rayne Brown defeated Harry Warren in the primary election to become Holliman's challenger in the general election. Holliman lost to Brown in the election.

2008

On November 4, 2008, Holliman won re-election to the North Carolina House of Representatives.[1] $345,228 was raised for this campaign.[2]

North Carolina House of Representatives, District 81
Candidates Votes
Green check mark transparent.png Hugh Holliman (D) 12,975
Rayne Brown (R) 11,673

Campaign donors

2008

In 2008, Holliman collected $345,228 in donations.[3]

These were the largest contributors in 2008.

Donor Amount
NORTH CAROLINA DEMOCRATIC HOUSE CMTE $114,278
NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL SOCIETY $9,000
BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF NORTH CAROLINA $9,000
PIEDMONT TRIAD ANESTHESIA $8,000
NATIONWIDE $8,000
CITIZENS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION $8,000
BANK OF AMERICA $7,000

Balanced budget requirement

It's possible the state is violating North Carolina's constitutional requirement for a balanced budget. The discrepancy boils down to accounting.

State budget writers work on a cash basis, but accounting rules encourage budget writers to work on an accrual basis. Accrual accounting would require budget writers to account for the promises they've made to state workers.

A change would immediately highlight a $28 billion shortfall in the retiree health benefits promised to state workers.[4]






External links

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References