Difference between revisions of "Illinois' 2nd Congressional District elections, 2012"

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===Debbie Halvorson===
 
===Debbie Halvorson===
 
From 2009 to 2011, [[Debbie Halvorson]] served the [[United States House of Representatives]], representing Illinois District 11. Prior to that, she served 12 years in the [[Illinois State Senate]]. For 2012, according to Halvorson's campaign website, among the main political issues she has included to address in her campaign are the economy, transportation, education, senior citizens issues, veterans, health care, energy and women's issues.
 
From 2009 to 2011, [[Debbie Halvorson]] served the [[United States House of Representatives]], representing Illinois District 11. Prior to that, she served 12 years in the [[Illinois State Senate]]. For 2012, according to Halvorson's campaign website, among the main political issues she has included to address in her campaign are the economy, transportation, education, senior citizens issues, veterans, health care, energy and women's issues.
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Campaign tactics and controversies that have appeared on the campaign trail include the following:
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* A supporter of [[Jesse Jackson, Jr.]], Halvorson's Democratic Primary opponent, stated Debbie Halvorson's campaign was "driven by demonic forces". In response to this claim, Halvorson stated, while also commenting on Jackson's job as a congressman: “If he had been doing his job, there would be no need for me to run. Whoever said my agenda is demonic is wrong. The people and those who are supporting me are happy I’m running and there’s finally going to be a choice in this race.”<ref> [http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/politics/clout/chi-rep-jackson-supporter-says-foe-driven-by-political-demonic-forces-20120220,0,150888.story ''Chicago Tribune'', "Rep. Jackson supporter says foe driven by 'political demonic forces'", February 20, 2012]</ref>
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* During the week of [[BC2012#February|February 19, 2012]], Halvorson called for the investigation of the company that has a contract to build an airport in Chicago that was proposed by [[Jesse Jackson, Jr.]] According to reports, the company, SNC Lavalin, has faced scrutiny under allegations that it had business ties to Libya after a consultant was accused of trying to smuggle Muammar Gaddafi’s son into Mexico. Jackson has since stated full faith in the company.<ref> [http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2012/02/19/halvorson-calls-for-probe-of-peotone-airport-contractor/ ''CBS Chicago'', "Halvorson Calls For Probe Of Peotone Airport Contractor", February 19, 2012]</ref>
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Revision as of 12:00, 19 March 2012

2014



CongressLogo.png

Illinois' 2nd Congressional District

General Election Date
November 6, 2012

Primary Date
March 20, 2012

November 6 Election Winner:
Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. Democratic Party
Incumbent prior to election:
Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. Democratic Party
Jesse L. Jackson Jr.jpg

Illinois U.S. House Elections
District 1District 2District 3District 4District 5District 6District 7District 8District 9District 10District 11District 12District 13District 14District 15District 16District 17District 18

2012 U.S. Senate Elections

Flag of Illinois.png
The 2nd congressional district of Illinois will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012.
This is the 2nd congressional district prior to the 2010 redistricting.

Candidates wishing to run were required to file by the signature filing deadline of December 27, 2011. The primary elections will be held on March 20, 2012.

Illinois' 2nd congressional district is based in Cook and Will counties, and includes the south suburbs of Chicago, extending slightly into Will County, and also includes the city's far southeast side. It covers 184.64 square miles, making it one of the 70 smallest districts in the country and the seventh smallest in Illinois.


Heading into the election the incumbent is Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. (D), who was first elected in 1994.

Candidates

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Republican Party Republican Primary

Race background

Jesse Jackson, Jr.

Incumbent Jesse Jackson, Jr. has held the position since December 12, 1995. For 2012, according to Jackson's campaign website, among the main political issues Jackson has included to address in his campaign are the economy, health care, education, energy and environment, and international affairs.

Campaign tactics and controversies that have appeared on the campaign trail include the following:

  • In early-October 2011, campaign-related e-mails were sent by Jackson's staff members in response to campaign statements made by Democratic Primary opponent Debbie Halvorson. The e-mails, according to reports, were sent from the staff members' government accounts after requests by the media. Allegedly, this violated U.S. House rules that prohibit using government email accounts for campaign or political purposes. According to the House rules maual: "[T]he use of one‘s office desktop computer (including one‘s mail.house.gov e-mail address) to send or receive such communications continues to be prohibited." However, Jackson's spokesperson Kitty Kurth claimed that those emails can be categorized as appropriate because of an exemption allowing press secretaries to "answer occasional questions on political matters."[4]
  • Jesse Jackson, Jr. stated during his campaign for re-election that he plans on introducing legislation that would turn the Historic Pullman District in Chicago, Illinois into a national park. The Chicago neighborhood is the first planned industrial community in the United States. The potential proposal would allow for a one-to-three year feasibility study to determine if designating the park at certain locations would work. If so, a proposal to Congress would be made to pass a measure to designate it as a national park.[5]
  • Jackson stated that his Democratic Primary opponent, Debbie Halvorson has not supported President Barack Obama as much as he has. He pointed out that Halvorson voted against the president 88 times while in Congress.[6]

Debbie Halvorson

From 2009 to 2011, Debbie Halvorson served the United States House of Representatives, representing Illinois District 11. Prior to that, she served 12 years in the Illinois State Senate. For 2012, according to Halvorson's campaign website, among the main political issues she has included to address in her campaign are the economy, transportation, education, senior citizens issues, veterans, health care, energy and women's issues.

Campaign tactics and controversies that have appeared on the campaign trail include the following:

  • A supporter of Jesse Jackson, Jr., Halvorson's Democratic Primary opponent, stated Debbie Halvorson's campaign was "driven by demonic forces". In response to this claim, Halvorson stated, while also commenting on Jackson's job as a congressman: “If he had been doing his job, there would be no need for me to run. Whoever said my agenda is demonic is wrong. The people and those who are supporting me are happy I’m running and there’s finally going to be a choice in this race.”[7]
  • During the week of February 19, 2012, Halvorson called for the investigation of the company that has a contract to build an airport in Chicago that was proposed by Jesse Jackson, Jr. According to reports, the company, SNC Lavalin, has faced scrutiny under allegations that it had business ties to Libya after a consultant was accused of trying to smuggle Muammar Gaddafi’s son into Mexico. Jackson has since stated full faith in the company.[8]

[edit]

See also: Redistricting in Illinois

Slow population growth required Illinois to lose one congressional seat following the 2010 census. With Democrats in charge of the House, Senate, and governorship, it was easy to pass a map beneficial to their party. According to an analysis by Politico, the new map could cost the GOP up to five U.S. House seats. GOP consultant David From said of the map, “It’s kind of a work of art, in the wrong direction. There’s a lot of creativity.”[9]

Republicans filed suit against the map, but eventually saw it upheld in the courts. A federal court panel agreed with the Republican complaint that the map was "a blatant political move to increase the number of Democratic congressional seats," but said that Republicans "failed to present a workable standard by which to evaluate such claims."[10]

Following the passage of the map, Jesse Jackson, Jr. said he had serious concerns about minority representation and whether it adhered to the Voting Rights Act.[11] Under the new map, former congresswoman Debbie Halvorson (D) was drawn into Jackson's district. She previously represented District 11 until losing to Adam Kinzinger (R) in 2010.[12] Halvorson, who is white, is the first real competition Jackson has had. The district has been held by a black congressman for the last three decades.[13]

Illinois' Congressional District 2, 2012
Poll Jesse Jackson Jr. (D) Debbie Halvorson (D)UndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
Debbie Halvorson campaign
(January 10-12, 2012)
48%35%17%+/-0400
Lake Research Partners
(January, 2012)
44%30%26%+/-0496
Lake Research Partners
(March 8-11, 2012)
59%23%18%+/-4.9496
AVERAGES 50.33% 29.33% 20.33% +/-1.63 464
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org

The following are endorsements from notable people or organizations regarding district candidates:

Jesse Jackson:

Endorsed by Statement
Nancy Pelosi "He may be junior in terms of his title in the family, but he is very senior in the amount of respect he commands in the Congress of the United States."[14]
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel In a statement, the Chicago mayor called Jackson, Jr. a "progressive fighter".[15]
Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn "Time and again, Congressman Jackson has delivered for the residents of the 2nd District in Illinois. Congressman Jackson deserves to go back to Washington, D.C.and help President Obama continue to fight for jobs, economic recovery and everyday Americans."[16]

Debbie Halvorson:

No notable endorsements have surfaced from reports'.

2010

On November 2, 2010, Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. won re-election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Isaac C. Hayes (R) and Anthony W. Williams (G) in the general election.[17]

U.S. House of Representatives, Illinois' 2nd Congressional District, General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJesse L. Jackson, Jr. Incumbent 80.5% 150,666
     Republican Isaac C. Hayes 13.8% 25,883
     Green Anthony W. Williams 5.6% 10,564
Total Votes 187,113

2008

On November 4, 2008, Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. won re-election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Anthony W. Williams (R) and Nathan Peoples (G) in the general election.[18]

2006

On November 7, 2006, Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. won re-election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Robert Belin (R) and Anthony W. Williams (L) in the general election.[19]

2004

On November 2, 2004, Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. won re-election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Stephanie Sailor (L) in the general election.[20]

2002

On November 5, 2002, Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. won re-election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Doug Nelson (R) in the general election.[21]

2000

On November 7, 2000, Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. won re-election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Robert Gordon III (R) in the general election.[22]

1998

On November 3, 1998, Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. won re-election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Robert Gordon III (R) and Matthew Joseph Beauchamp (L) in the general election.[23]

1996

On November 5, 1996, Jesse L. Jackson, Jr. won re-election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Frank H. Stratman (L) in the general election.[24]

See also


External links


References

  1. Chicago Tribune "Halvorson takes on Jackson for Congress" Accessed December 5, 2011
  2. Illinois State Board of Elections "Candidate List" Accessed December 27, 2011
  3. Illinois State Board of Elections "Candidate List" Accessed December 27, 2011
  4. WBEZ.org, "Jackson's staff sends handful of campaign-related emails from congressional addresses", February 14, 2012
  5. Chicagoist.com, "Jesse Jackson, Jr. Says Pullman Should Be A National Historic site", Retrieved February 16, 2012
  6. CBS Chicago, "Halvorson voted against the president 88 times while in Congress", February 20, 2012
  7. Chicago Tribune, "Rep. Jackson supporter says foe driven by 'political demonic forces'", February 20, 2012
  8. CBS Chicago, "Halvorson Calls For Probe Of Peotone Airport Contractor", February 19, 2012
  9. Politico, "Illinois Republicans brace for bloodbath," June 2, 2011
  10. BusinessWeek, "Illinois Republicans Lose Challenge to New Congressional Map," December 16, 2011
  11. Roll Call, "Democratic Illinois Trio Voices Ire Over Map," September 22, 2011
  12. Progress Illinois, "Halvorson To Run Against Jackson Jr.," October 6, 2011
  13. Huffington Post, "Jesse Jackson Jr.'s House Seat Challenged By Debbie Halvorson," February 3, 2012
  14. WGN TV.com, "Nancy Pelosi throws her support behind Jesse Jackson Jr.", March 3, 2012
  15. PJ Star, "Mayor Rahm Emanuel Backs Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. for District 2 Congressman", March 6, 2012
  16. Chicago Tribune, "Quinn backs Jackson, but not in person", March 11, 2012
  17. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010"
  18. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008"
  19. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006"
  20. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004"
  21. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002"
  22. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000"
  23. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998"
  24. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996"