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Difference between revisions of "Illinois Ballot Question 1 (1980)"

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'''Illinois Ballot Question 1''' was on the [[1980 ballot measures#Illinois|November 4, 1980 ballot]] in [[Illinois]] as an {{icafull}}, where it was '''approved.'''
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'''Illinois Ballot Question 1''', also known as the '''Cutback Amendment''', was on the [[1980 ballot measures#Illinois|November 4, 1980 ballot]] in [[Illinois]] as an {{icafull}}, where it was '''approved.'''
  
 
It has the distinction of being the first and (so far) only citizen-initiated ballot measure ever to appear on the Illinois ballot.  The proposed amendment was the object of a lawsuit before it went to the ballot; the result of this lawsuit was that the [[Illinois Supreme Court]] removed several sections from the initiative on the grounds that they violated the part of the Illinois Constitution that says that citizen initiatives can only deal with "structural and procedural" aspects of [[Article IV, Illinois Constitution|Article IV]] of the [[Illinois Constitution]].<ref name="upi"/>
 
It has the distinction of being the first and (so far) only citizen-initiated ballot measure ever to appear on the Illinois ballot.  The proposed amendment was the object of a lawsuit before it went to the ballot; the result of this lawsuit was that the [[Illinois Supreme Court]] removed several sections from the initiative on the grounds that they violated the part of the Illinois Constitution that says that citizen initiatives can only deal with "structural and procedural" aspects of [[Article IV, Illinois Constitution|Article IV]] of the [[Illinois Constitution]].<ref name="upi"/>

Revision as of 21:25, 27 June 2009

Illinois Ballot Question 1, also known as the Cutback Amendment, was on the November 4, 1980 ballot in Illinois as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was approved.

It has the distinction of being the first and (so far) only citizen-initiated ballot measure ever to appear on the Illinois ballot. The proposed amendment was the object of a lawsuit before it went to the ballot; the result of this lawsuit was that the Illinois Supreme Court removed several sections from the initiative on the grounds that they violated the part of the Illinois Constitution that says that citizen initiatives can only deal with "structural and procedural" aspects of Article IV of the Illinois Constitution.[1]

The measure reduced the size of the state House of Representatives from 177 members to 118 members beginning with the elections in 1982. It altered Section 1, Section 2 and Section 3 of Article IV of the Illinois Constitution.

A group led by Pat Quinn sponsored the initiative, collecting about 375,000 signatures to put it on the ballot.[1]

When the petition drive to collect signatures to qualify the measure for the ballot started, members of the Illinois General Assembly drew two years' advance pay at the start of each two-year session. As the petition drive gained momentum, the legislature pushed through a bill to end that practice.[1]

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 United Press International, "Pat Quinn: A man politicians love to hate", February 8, 1980