Illinois signature requirements

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Signature requirements
(By state)

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This page details Illinois signature requirements. In many states, the signatures of registered voters must be collected to place candidates or initiatives on the ballot. However, for candidates, filing fees are sometimes required or accepted in lieu of signatures.

Federal offices

U.S. Senate

Established party candidates must file between 5,000 and 10,00 signatures gathered from members of their party. Independent candidates and new party candidates must file 25,000 signatures or signatures equal to 1% of the voters who voted in the last general election, whichever is less. Independent and new party signatures may be collected from any registered voter.[1]

Write-in candidates must file a notarized "Declaration of Intent to be a Write-In Candidate" with the election authority or authorities for the jurisdiction(s) in which the candidate intends to run. This is typically the county clerk or board of elections commissioners--forms are not filed with the State Board of Elections. Write-in candidates may participate in the primary or general election.[2]

U.S. House

Established party candidates must file signatures equal to 1/2% (0.5%) of their party's registered voters in the district. Independent candidates must file signatures equal to between 5% and 8% of the voters who voted in the preceding general election in the district. New party candidates must file signatures equal to at least 5% of the voters who voted in the preceding general election in the district--no maximum is imposed. Independent and new party signatures may be collected from any registered voter in the district.[1]

Write-in candidates must file a notarized "Declaration of Intent to be a Write-In Candidate" with the election authority or authorities for the jurisdiction(s) in which the candidate intends to run. This is typically the county clerk or board of elections commissioners--forms are not filed with the State Board of Elections. Write-in candidates may participate in the primary or general election.[2]

Note: For the first election following redistricting (most recently 2012), alternative requirements are imposed. Established party candidates must file the signatures of 600 party members. Independent candidates and new party candidates must file 5,000 signatures.[3]

Filing deadlines

2014

See also: Signature requirements and deadlines for 2014 U.S. Congress elections

Partisan candidates seeking to participate in the primary had to file with the State Board of Elections between November 25, 2013 and December 2, 2013. For write-in candidates seeking to participate in the primary, the filing deadline is 61 days before the primary election, which is January 16, 2014. The deadline for both independent candidates and candidates of a new political party to file nomination papers is June 23, 2014. For write-in candidates seeking to participate in the general election, the filing deadline is September 4, 2014.[4]

2012

See also: Signature requirements and deadlines for 2012 U.S. Congress elections

Established party candidates had to file with the State Board of Elections between November 28, 2011 and December 5, 2011. Independent and new party candidates had to file with the State Board of Elections between June 18 and June 25, 2012.[2]

Write-in candidates had to file their “Declaration of Intent to be a Write-In Candidate” with the appropriate election authorities at least 61 days prior to the election. However, if a candidate qualified for the ballot but was successfully challenged and removed from the ballot, he or she could file as a write-in candidate up to 7 days prior to the election.[2]

State offices

Statewide executive offices

Established party candidates must file between 5,000 and 10,00 signatures gathered from members of their party. Independent candidates and new party candidates must file 25,000 signatures or signatures equal to 1% of the voters who voted in the last general election, whichever is less. Independent and new party signatures may be collected from any registered voter.[1]

Write-in candidates must file a notarized "Declaration of Intent to be a Write-In Candidate" with the election authority or authorities for the jurisdiction(s) in which the candidate intends to run. This is typically the county clerk or board of elections commissioners--forms are not filed with the State Board of Elections. Write-in candidates may participate in the primary or general election.[2]

State legislature

Established party candidates for the Illinois State Senate must file signatures equal to between 1,000 and 3000 of their party's registered voters in the district. Established party candidates for the Illinois House of Representatives must file signatures equal to between 500 and 1,500 of their party's registered voters in the district.[2]

Independent candidates must file signatures equal to between 5% and 8% of the voters who voted in the preceding general election in the district. New party candidates must file signatures equal to at least 5% of the voters who voted in the preceding general election in the district--no maximum is imposed. Independent and new party signatures may be collected from any registered voter in the district.[1]

Write-in candidates must file a notarized "Declaration of Intent to be a Write-In Candidate" with the election authority or authorities for the jurisdiction(s) in which the candidate intends to run. This is typically the county clerk or board of elections commissioners--forms are not filed with the State Board of Elections. Write-in candidates may participate in the primary or general election.[2]

Note: For the first election following redistricting (most recently 2012), alternative requirements are imposed for independent and new party candidates. Independent candidates and new party candidates for State Senate must file 3,000 signatures. Independent candidates and new party candidates for state House must file 1,500 signatures.[5]

Filing deadlines

2014

See also: Signature requirements and deadlines for 2014 state government elections

Partisan candidates seeking to participate in the primary had to file with the State Board of Elections between November 25, 2013 and December 2, 2013. For write-in candidates seeking to participate in the primary, the filing deadline is 61 days before the primary election, which is January 16, 2014. The deadline for both independent candidates and candidates of a new political party to file nomination papers is June 23, 2014. For write-in candidates seeking to participate in the general election, the filing deadline is September 4, 2014.[6]

2012

See also: Signature requirements and deadlines for 2012 state government elections

Established party candidates had to file with the State Board of Elections between November 28, 2011 and December 5, 2011. Independent and new party candidates had to file with the State Board of Elections between June 18 and June 25, 2012.[2]

Write-in candidates had to file their “Declaration of Intent to be a Write-In Candidate” with the appropriate election authorities at least 61 days prior to the election. However, if a candidate qualified for the ballot but was successfully challenged and removed from the ballot, he or she could file as a write-in candidate up to 7 days prior to the election.[2]

Ballot measures

The signature requirement for constitutional amendments is 8% of the total votes cast for Governor in the last election.

Year Amendment
2014 298,399
2012 298,399
2010 278,934
2008 279,039

DocumentIcon.jpg See law: Illinois Constitution, Article XIV, Section 3

Basis for calculation

  • 3,729,989 votes were cast for governor in the 2010 election.[7]

Signature deadlines

Under Illinois law, the deadline to submit a citizen initiated constitutional amendments is 6 months before the general election.[8]

2014

The filing deadline to file a statewide petition and constitutional amendments for the Illinois ballot is May 5, 2014.[9]

2012

The 2012 deadline to submit a constitutional amendment to the Illinois ballot was May 7, 2012.[8]

See also

External links

References