Difference between revisions of "Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2012"

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m (Text replace - 'C-64 in 1992' to 'CI-64 in 1992')
m (Text replace - "Colorado Term Limits Act (1990)" to "Colorado Term Limits Amendment, Issue 5 (1990)")
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::''See also: [[State legislative elections, 2012|State legislature elections]] and [[Impact of term limits on state legislative elections in 2012|Impact of term limits on state legislative elections]]''<hr>
+
{{Termlimits2012toc}}::''See also: [[State legislative elections, 2012|State legislature elections]] and [[Impact of term limits on state legislative elections in 2012|Impact of term limits on state legislative elections]]''<hr>
{{tnr}}'''Elections of state representatives in 13 states with state legislative term limits''' will take place on [[state legislative elections, 2012|November 6, 2012]]. The 13 states where state legislative elections are impacted by [[term limits on the ballot|term limits]] are close to 30% of the 42 states where state legislative elections of lower house members will take place in 2012.
+
{{tnr}}'''Elections of state representatives in 13 states with state legislative term limits''' took place on [[state legislative elections, 2012|November 6, 2012]]. The 13 states where state legislative elections are impacted by [[term limits on the ballot|term limits]] were close to 30% of the 42 states where state legislative elections of lower house members took place in 2012.
  
15 states have [[state legislatures with term limits|state legislative term limits]], but Louisiana is not holding a state house election in 2012 and Nebraska does not have a [[lower house]].
+
15 states have [[state legislatures with term limits|state legislative term limits]], but Louisiana did not hold a state house election in 2012 and Nebraska does not have a [[lower house]].
  
 
In the 13 states, 172 state representatives were ineligible to run for re-election in November because of [[State legislatures with term limits|term limit laws]] in their state.
 
In the 13 states, 172 state representatives were ineligible to run for re-election in November because of [[State legislatures with term limits|term limit laws]] in their state.
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* 85 incumbent Republicans
 
* 85 incumbent Republicans
  
The 172 state representatives who are termed-out represent 13.6% of the 1,263 total seats up for election in November in the 13 term-limited states with elections in November 2010.
+
The 172 state representatives who were termed-out represent 13.6% of the 1,263 total seats up for election in November in the 13 term-limited states with elections in November 2010.
  
 
:: ''See also: [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012]]''
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==Differential impact on parties==
 
==Differential impact on parties==
  
Going into the November 2012 election, the [[Democratic Party]] is the [[partisan composition of state senates|majority party]] in 4 of the 13 state houses with term limits.  The [[Republican Party]] is the majority party in 9 of the term-limited state houses.
+
Going into the November 2012 election, the [[Democratic Party]] was the [[partisan composition of state senates|majority party]] in 4 of the 13 state houses with term limits.  The [[Republican Party]] was the majority party in 9 of the term-limited state houses.
  
* In 7 states, the term limits axe falls more heavily on incumbent Republicans:  Arizona, Florida, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oklahoma and South Dakota.  In all of these states, the [[partisan composition of state houses|current majority party]] is also the Republican Party.
+
* In 7 states, the term limits axe fell more heavily on incumbent Republicans:  Arizona, Florida, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oklahoma and South Dakota.  In all of these states, the [[partisan composition of state houses|current majority party]] was also the Republican Party.
* In 6 states, the term limits axe falls more heavily on incumbent Democrats:  Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Michigan, and Nevada.  In 4 of these states, the [[partisan composition of state houses|current majority party]] is also the [[Democratic Party]].  These states include Arkansas, California, Maine, and Nevada.  In 2 of the 6 states where term limits affect incumbent Democrats more heavily, the [[partisan composition of state houses|current majority party]] is Republican.  These states are Colorado and Michigan.
+
* In 6 states, the term limits axe fell more heavily on incumbent Democrats:  Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Michigan, and Nevada.  In 3 of these states, the [[partisan composition of state houses|current majority party]] was also the [[Democratic Party]].  These states include Arkansas, California, and Nevada.  In 3 of the 6 states where term limits affected incumbent Democrats more heavily, the [[partisan composition of state houses|current majority party]] was Republican.  These states were Colorado, Maine and Michigan.
  
 
==Overview chart==
 
==Overview chart==
  
'''Note:''' The figures in Column 5 ([[Impact of term limits on state legislative elections in 2012#State houses|"Seats impacted by term limits"]]) only reflects [[:Category:Current members of state houses|current members of state houses]] who are unable to run for re-election to their state's assembly in 2010 because of term limits.  In some cases, including Ohio, state representatives who would have been unable to run for re-election in November resigned earlier in the year or were appointed to other positions.  Representatives who resigned, and are not current members of their state houses, are not counted in these figures.
+
'''Note:''' The figures in Column 5 ([[Impact of term limits on state legislative elections in 2012#State houses|"Seats impacted by term limits"]]) only reflects [[:Category:Current members of state houses|current members of state houses]] who were unable to run for re-election to their state's assembly in 2010 because of term limits.  In some cases, including Ohio, state representatives who would have been unable to run for re-election in November resigned earlier in the year or were appointed to other positions.  Representatives who resigned, and were not current members of their state houses, are not counted in these figures.
  
 
{|class="wikitable" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5" border="1" style="background:none" style="width:90%;"
 
{|class="wikitable" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5" border="1" style="background:none" style="width:90%;"
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|-
 
|-
 
| [[Maine]]: ([[Maine House of Representatives|House]]), ([[Maine House of Representatives elections, 2012|2012 elections]])
 
| [[Maine]]: ([[Maine House of Representatives|House]]), ([[Maine House of Representatives elections, 2012|2012 elections]])
| align="center" | {{bluedot}}
+
| align="center" | {{reddot}}
 
| align="center" | 153
 
| align="center" | 153
 
| align="center" | 153
 
| align="center" | 153
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|-valign="top"
 
|-valign="top"
| style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | '''Totals:''' || text align="center" | (4) {{bluedot}} (9) {{reddot}} || text align="center"| '''1,263''' || text align="center"| '''1,263'''  || text align="center"| '''87''' {{bluedot}} + '''85''' {{reddot}} = '''172''' || align="center" | '''6''' {{bluedot}}, '''7''' {{reddot}}  
+
| style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | '''Totals:''' || text align="center" | (3) {{bluedot}} (10) {{reddot}} || text align="center"| '''1,263''' || text align="center"| '''1,263'''  || text align="center"| '''87''' {{bluedot}} + '''85''' {{reddot}} = '''172''' || align="center" | '''6''' {{bluedot}}, '''7''' {{reddot}}  
 
|}
 
|}
  
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<center>{{bluedot}} = <small>[[Partisan composition of state houses|Democratic Party is majority party]] • {{reddot}} = [[Partisan composition of state houses|Republican Party is majority party]] </small></center>
 
<center>{{bluedot}} = <small>[[Partisan composition of state houses|Democratic Party is majority party]] • {{reddot}} = [[Partisan composition of state houses|Republican Party is majority party]] </small></center>
 
<span style="font-size: larger;font-weight: bold;"></span></div><br><br><br>
 
<span style="font-size: larger;font-weight: bold;"></span></div><br><br><br>
 
  
 
==={{reddot}} Arizona===
 
==={{reddot}} Arizona===
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:: ''See also: [[Arizona House of Representatives elections, 2012]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[Arizona House of Representatives elections, 2012]]''
  
All of Arizona's [[:Category:Current member, Arizona House of Representatives|60 state representative seats]] are up for election on November 6.  Arizona representatives serve [[Length of terms of state representatives|two-year terms]] with a [[State legislatures with term limits|four-term/eight-year]] limit that was imposed by [[Arizona Term Limits Initiative, Proposition 107 (1992)|Proposition 107 in 1992]].  Arizona's term limits apply to parts of terms and not just full terms.   
+
All of Arizona's [[:Category:Current member, Arizona House of Representatives|60 state representative seats]] were upfor election on November 6.  Arizona representatives serve [[Length of terms of state representatives|two-year terms]] with a [[State legislatures with term limits|four-term/eight-year]] limit that was imposed by [[Arizona Term Limits, Proposition 107 (1992)|Proposition 107 in 1992]].  Arizona's term limits apply to parts of terms and not just full terms.   
  
In the 2012 state house elections, 5 representatives, or 8.3% of the 60-member House, who were first elected in 2004 (0 [[Democratic]] state representatives and 5 [[Republican|GOP]] state representatives) cannot run for re-election.   
+
In the 2012 state house elections, 3 representatives, or 8.3% of the 60-member House, who were first elected in 2004 (0 [[Democratic]] state representatives and 3 [[Republican|GOP]] state representatives) could not run for re-election.   
  
In addition to the 5 Arizona state representatives who are leaving office because of Arizona's term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Arizona|2 state senators are also leaving]].
+
In addition to the 3 Arizona state representatives who left office because of Arizona's term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Arizona|2 state senators are also leaving]].
  
Arizona state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
Arizona state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
 
'''Democrats (0):'''
 
'''Democrats (0):'''
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None
 
None
  
'''Republicans (5):'''
+
'''Republicans (3):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Jerry Weiers]]
 
+
*[[Jim Weiers]]
category = Arizona
+
*[[Nancy G. McLain]]
category = Republican Party
+
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
notnamespace = Template
+
noresultsheader=&nbsp;
+
</dpl>
+
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
 
  
 
==={{bluedot}} Arkansas===
 
==={{bluedot}} Arkansas===
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:: ''See also: [[Arkansas House of Representatives elections, 2012]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[Arkansas House of Representatives elections, 2012]]''
  
The [[Arkansas House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Arkansas voters approved the [[Arkansas Term Limits Initiative (1992)|Arkansas Term Limits Initiative]] in 1992 as an {{icafull}}.
+
The [[Arkansas House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Arkansas voters approved the [[Arkansas Term Limits Initiative, Amendment 4 (1992)|Arkansas Term Limits Initiative]] in 1992 as an {{icafull}}.
  
 
There are 100 [[Arkansas State Representative]]s.  In 2012, 23 of them (23%) who are [[:Category:Current members of state houses|current members]] were ineligible to run again in November (19 [[Democratic]] state representatives and 4 [[Republican]] state representatives).
 
There are 100 [[Arkansas State Representative]]s.  In 2012, 23 of them (23%) who are [[:Category:Current members of state houses|current members]] were ineligible to run again in November (19 [[Democratic]] state representatives and 4 [[Republican]] state representatives).
  
In addition to the 23 state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Arkansas|10 Arkansas state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 23 state representatives who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Arkansas|10 Arkansas state senators were also termed-out]].
  
Arkansas state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
Arkansas state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
 
'''Democrats (19):'''
 
'''Democrats (19):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
 
  
category = Arkansas
+
*[[Barry Hyde]]
category = Democratic Party
+
*[[Billy Gaskill]]
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
*[[Bobby Pierce]]
notnamespace = Template
+
*[[Buddy Lovell]]
noresultsheader=&nbsp;
+
*[[Charolette Wagner]]
</dpl>
+
*[[Clark Hall]]
 +
*[[David Powers (Arkansas)]]
 +
*[[Eddie Cheatham]]
 +
*[[Fred Allen]]
 +
*[[Jerry Brown, Arkansas Representative]]
 +
*[[Johnnie Roebuck]]
 +
*[[Kathy Webb]]
 +
*[[Larry Cowling]]
 +
*[[Mike Patterson]]
 +
*[[Randy Stewart, Arkansas Representative]]
 +
*[[Robert Moore (Arkansas)]]
 +
*[[Tommy Baker]]
 +
*[[Toni Bradford]]
 +
*[[Tracy Pennartz]]
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
 
'''Republicans (4):'''
 
'''Republicans (4):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Bryan King]]
 +
*[[Donna Hutchinson]]
 +
*[[Ed Garner]]
 +
*[[Jon Woods]]
  
category = Arkansas
 
category = Republican Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=&nbsp;
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
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The [[California State Assembly]] has been a term-limited state house since California voters approved [[California Term Limits, Proposition 140 (1990)|Proposition 140 in 1990]]. Under the terms of Proposition 140, the members of the state assembly can serve no more than three 2-year terms in the state assembly.  This is a lifetime limit, as is the case in five other states with state legislative term limits.
 
The [[California State Assembly]] has been a term-limited state house since California voters approved [[California Term Limits, Proposition 140 (1990)|Proposition 140 in 1990]]. Under the terms of Proposition 140, the members of the state assembly can serve no more than three 2-year terms in the state assembly.  This is a lifetime limit, as is the case in five other states with state legislative term limits.
  
There are 80 members in the state assembly, and 21 of them (26.25%) termed-out in 2012.  Of them, 16 are [[Democratic]] and 5 are [[Republican]].
+
There are 80 members in the state assembly, and 22 of them (27.5%) termed-out in 2012.  Of them, 17 were [[Democratic]] and 5 were [[Republican]].
  
In addition to the 21 California state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#California|9 California state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 22 California state representatives who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#California|6 California state senators were also termed-out]].
  
California state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
California state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
'''Democrats (16):'''
+
'''Democrats (17):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Anthony Portantino, Jr.]]
 
+
*[[Cathleen Galgiani]]
category = California
+
*[[Charles Calderon]]
category = Democratic Party
+
*[[Felipe Fuentes]]
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
*[[Fiona Ma]]
notnamespace = Template
+
*[[Gilbert Cedillo]]
noresultsheader=&nbsp;
+
*[[James Beall Jr.]]
</dpl>
+
*[[Jared Huffman]]
 +
*[[Jose Solorio]]
 +
*[[Julia Brownley]]
 +
*[[Mary Hayashi]]
 +
*[[Mike Davis]]
 +
*[[Mike Eng]]
 +
*[[Mike Feuer]]
 +
*[[Sandré Swanson]]
 +
*[[Tony Mendoza (California)]]
 +
*[[Wilmer Carter]]
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
 
'''Republicans (5):'''
 
'''Republicans (5):'''
 
+
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Cameron Smyth]]
 
+
*[[Jim Silva]]
category = California
+
*[[Kevin Jeffries]]
category = Republican Party
+
*[[Martin Garrick]]
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
*[[Paul Cook]]
notnamespace = Template
+
{{colend}}
noresultsheader=None listed yet
+
</dpl>
+
  
 
==={{reddot}} Colorado===
 
==={{reddot}} Colorado===
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:: ''See also: [[Colorado House of Representatives elections, 2012]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[Colorado House of Representatives elections, 2012]]''
  
The [[Colorado House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited [[lower house|state house]] since Colorado voters approved [[Colorado Term Limits Act (1990)|Issue 5 in 1990]].  The affirmative vote by Colorado's electorate in Issue 5 altered [[Article V, Colorado Constitution#Section 3|Section 3 of Article V]] on the [[Colorado Constitution]] to say that [[Colorado State Representative]]s could serve no more than four 2-year terms in office.
+
The [[Colorado House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited [[lower house|state house]] since Colorado voters approved [[Colorado Term Limits Amendment, Issue 5 (1990)|Issue 5 in 1990]].  The affirmative vote by Colorado's electorate in Issue 5 altered [[Article V, Colorado Constitution#Section 3|Section 3 of Article V]] on the [[Colorado Constitution]] to say that [[Colorado State Representative]]s could serve no more than four 2-year terms in office.
  
There are 65 representatives in the Colorado house. 9 of them, or 13.8%, can't run in 2012 because of term limits.  Of these 9, 5 are [[Democratic]] and 4 are [[Republican]]
+
There are 65 representatives in the Colorado house. 8 of them, or 12.31%, could not run in 2012 because of term limits.  Of these 8, 4 were [[Democratic]] and 4 were [[Republican]]
  
In addition to the 9 Colorado state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Colorado|6 Colorado state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 8 Colorado state representatives who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Colorado|6 Colorado state senators were also termed-out]].
  
Colorado state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
Colorado state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
'''Democrats (5):'''
+
'''Democrats (4):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[John Soper]]
 +
*[[Judith Anne Solano]]
 +
*[[Nancy Todd]]
 +
*[[Wesley McKinley]]
  
category = Colorado
 
category = Democratic Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=&nbsp;
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
 
'''Republicans (4):'''
 
'''Republicans (4):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[David Balmer]]
 +
*[[James Kerr]]
 +
*[[Larry Liston]]
 +
*[[Thomas Massey]]
  
category = Colorado
 
category = Republican Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=&nbsp;
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
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The [[Florida House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Florida voters approved [[Florida Term Limits, Amendment 9 (1992)|Amendment 9 in 1992]].  Amendment 9 altered [[Article VI, Florida Constitution#Section 4|Article VI, section 4]] of the [[Florida Constitution]] to impose a maximum of four 2-year terms on [[Florida State Representative]]s.
 
The [[Florida House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Florida voters approved [[Florida Term Limits, Amendment 9 (1992)|Amendment 9 in 1992]].  Amendment 9 altered [[Article VI, Florida Constitution#Section 4|Article VI, section 4]] of the [[Florida Constitution]] to impose a maximum of four 2-year terms on [[Florida State Representative]]s.
  
There are 120 representatives in the [[Florida House of Representatives]].  12 of them, or 10%, are termed-out in 2012.  Of these 12, 2 are [[Democratic]] and 10 are [[Republican]].
+
There are 120 representatives in the [[Florida House of Representatives]].  12 of them, or 10%, were termed-out in 2012.  Of these 12, 2 were [[Democratic]] and 10 were [[Republican]].
  
In addition to the 12 Florida state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Florida|10 Florida state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 12 Florida state representatives who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Florida|10 Florida state senators were also termed-out]].
  
Florida state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
Florida state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
 
'''Democrats (2):'''
 
'''Democrats (2):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Ari Abraham Porth]]
 +
*[[Franklin Sands]]
  
category = Florida
 
category = Democratic Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=&nbsp;
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
 
'''Republicans (10):'''
 
'''Republicans (10):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Carlos Lopez-Cantera]]
 +
*[[Dean Cannon]]
 +
*[[Denise Grimsley]]
 +
*[[Dorothy Hukill]]
 +
*[[John Legg]]
 +
*[[Marti Coley]]
 +
*[[Paige Kreegel]]
 +
*[[Richard Glorioso]]
 +
*[[Trudi Williams]]
 +
*[[William Proctor]]
  
category = Florida
 
category = Republican Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=None listed yet
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
==={{bluedot}} Maine===
+
==={{reddot}} Maine===
 
{{meflag}}
 
{{meflag}}
 
:: ''See also: [[Maine House of Representatives elections, 2012]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[Maine House of Representatives elections, 2012]]''
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The [[Maine House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Maine voters approved [[Maine Term Limits, Question 1 (1993)|Question 1 in 1993]].  Under this law, state representatives can serve no more than four consecutive 2-year terms.  The [[Maine State Legislature]] tried, unsuccessfully, in 2007 to get the state's voters to extend the number of years they could consecutively serve in office by putting the [[Maine Term Limits Extension (2007)|Maine Term Limits Extension]] act on the ballot.  Voters overwhelmingly (67-33%) rejected it.
 
The [[Maine House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Maine voters approved [[Maine Term Limits, Question 1 (1993)|Question 1 in 1993]].  Under this law, state representatives can serve no more than four consecutive 2-year terms.  The [[Maine State Legislature]] tried, unsuccessfully, in 2007 to get the state's voters to extend the number of years they could consecutively serve in office by putting the [[Maine Term Limits Extension (2007)|Maine Term Limits Extension]] act on the ballot.  Voters overwhelmingly (67-33%) rejected it.
  
There are 153 state representatives in Maine. 26 of them, or 17%, are termed out in 2012.  Of these 26, 14 are [[Democratic]] and 12 are [[Republican]].
+
There are 153 state representatives in Maine. 26 of them, or 17%, were termed out in 2012.  Of these 26, 14 were [[Democratic]] and 12 were [[Republican]].
  
In addition to the 26 Maine state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Maine|10 Maine state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 26 Maine state representatives who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Maine|10 Maine state senators were also termed-out]].
  
Maine state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
Maine state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
 
'''Democrats (14):'''
 
'''Democrats (14):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[David Webster]]
 +
*[[Donald Pilon]]
 +
*[[Edward Mazurek]]
 +
*[[Emily Ann Cain]]
 +
*[[George Hogan]]
 +
*[[Herbert Clark]]
 +
*[[Jane Eberle]]
 +
*[[John Tuttle, Jr.]]
 +
*[[Linda Valentino]]
 +
*[[Mark Bryant]]
 +
*[[Robert Duchesne]]
 +
*[[Stephen Hanley]]
 +
*[[Timothy Driscoll]]
  
category = Maine
 
category = Democratic Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=&nbsp;
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
 
'''Republicans (12):'''
 
'''Republicans (12):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[David Richardson (Maine)]]
 +
*[[Gary Plummer]]
 +
*[[Howard McFadden]]
 +
*[[James Hamper]]
 +
*[[Joan Nass]]
 +
*[[Jonathan McKane]]
 +
*[[Kimberley Rosen]]
 +
*[[Patrick Flood]]
 +
*[[Peter Edgecomb]]
 +
*[[Philip Curtis]]
 +
*[[Richard Cebra]]
 +
*[[Stacey Fitts]]
 +
*[[Wesley Richardson]]
  
category = Maine
 
category = Republican Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=None listed yet
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
 
  
 
==={{reddot}} Michigan===
 
==={{reddot}} Michigan===
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The [[Michigan House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Michigan voters approved [[Michigan Term Limits Amendment, Proposal B (1992)|Proposal B in 1992]].  Proposal B created [[Article IV, Michigan Constitution#Section 54|Section 54 of Article IV]] of the [[Michigan Constitution]].  It says that state representatives are limited to 3 two-year terms.  As with five other states, this is a lifetime limit.
 
The [[Michigan House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Michigan voters approved [[Michigan Term Limits Amendment, Proposal B (1992)|Proposal B in 1992]].  Proposal B created [[Article IV, Michigan Constitution#Section 54|Section 54 of Article IV]] of the [[Michigan Constitution]].  It says that state representatives are limited to 3 two-year terms.  As with five other states, this is a lifetime limit.
  
14 of Michigan's 110 representatives, or 12.7%, are termed-out in 2012.  Of them, 9 are [[Democratic]] and 5 are [[Republican]].
+
14 of Michigan's 110 representatives, or 12.7%, were termed-out in 2012.  Of them, 9 were [[Democratic]] and 5 were [[Republican]].
  
Michigan state representative whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
Michigan state representative whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
 
'''Democrats (9):'''
 
'''Democrats (9):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Barbara Byrum]]
 
+
*[[Bob Constan]]
category = Michigan
+
*[[Joan Bauer]]
category = Democratic Party
+
*[[Mark Meadows (Michigan)]]
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
*[[Richard Hammel]]
notnamespace = Template
+
*[[Richard LeBlanc]]
noresultsheader=None listed yet
+
*[[Shanelle Jackson]]
</dpl>
+
*[[Steven Lindberg]]
 +
*[[Tim Melton]]
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
 
'''Republicans (5):'''
 
'''Republicans (5):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[David Agema]]
 +
*[[Judson Gilbert]]
 +
*[[Kenneth Horn]]
 +
*[[Martin Knollenberg]]
 +
*[[Paul Opsommer]]
  
category = Michigan
 
category = Republican Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=None listed yet
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
Line 399: Line 410:
 
The [[Missouri House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Missouri voters approved [[Missouri State Legislative Term Limits, Amendment 12 (1992)|Amendment 12 in 1992]].  Amendment 12 created [[Article III, Missouri Constitution#Section 8|Section 8 of Article III]] of the [[Missouri Constitution]], limiting members of the state house to 4 2-year terms.  As with five other states, this is a lifetime limit.  (Section 8 was later amended by [[Missouri Term Limit Calculations, Amendment 3 (2002)|Amendment 3]] in [[Missouri 2002 ballot measures|2002]] so that it does not apply to partial terms.)
 
The [[Missouri House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Missouri voters approved [[Missouri State Legislative Term Limits, Amendment 12 (1992)|Amendment 12 in 1992]].  Amendment 12 created [[Article III, Missouri Constitution#Section 8|Section 8 of Article III]] of the [[Missouri Constitution]], limiting members of the state house to 4 2-year terms.  As with five other states, this is a lifetime limit.  (Section 8 was later amended by [[Missouri Term Limit Calculations, Amendment 3 (2002)|Amendment 3]] in [[Missouri 2002 ballot measures|2002]] so that it does not apply to partial terms.)
  
There are 25 state representatives terming out in 2012, or 15.3% of the 163 members of the chamber.  Of them, 8 are [[Democratic]] and 17 are [[Republican]].
+
There were 25 state representatives terming out in 2012, or 15.3% of the 163 members of the chamber.  Of them, 8 were [[Democratic]] and 17 were [[Republican]].
  
In addition to the 25 Missouri state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Missouri|9 Missouri state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 25 Missouri state representatives who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Missouri|9 Missouri state senators were also termed-out]].
  
Missouri state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
Missouri state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
 
'''Democrats (8):'''
 
'''Democrats (8):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Jeanette Mott Oxford]]
 
+
*[[Joe Aull]]
category = Missouri
+
*[[Leonard Hughes, IV]]
category = Democratic Party
+
*[[Michael Brown]]
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
*[[Ron Casey]]
notnamespace = Template
+
*[[Sara Lampe]]
noresultsheader=None listed yet
+
*[[Terry Swinger]]
</dpl>
+
*[[Timothy Meadows]]
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
 
'''Republicans (17):'''
 
'''Republicans (17):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Barney Fisher]]
 
+
*[[Billy Pat Wright]]
category = Missouri
+
*[[Bob Nance]]
category = Republican Party
+
*[[Charles Denison]]
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
*[[Darrell Pollock]]
notnamespace = Template
+
*[[David Day]]
noresultsheader=None listed yet
+
*[[David Sater]]
</dpl>
+
*[[Don Wells]]
 +
*[[Jerry Nolte]]
 +
*[[Mike McGhee]]
 +
*[[Raymond Weter]]
 +
*[[Rodney Schad]]
 +
*[[Ryan Silvey]]
 +
*[[Steven Tilley]]
 +
*[[Tom Loehner]]
 +
*[[Vicki Schneider]]
 +
*[[Ward Franz]]
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
Line 435: Line 455:
 
The [[Montana House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Montana voters approved [[Montana Term Limits, Amendment CI-64 (1992)|CI-64 in 1992]].  C-64 created [[Article IV, Montana Constitution#Section 8|Section 8 of Article IV]] of the [[Montana Constitution]], which says that [[Montana State Representative]]s cannot serve 8 or more years in any 16-year period.  
 
The [[Montana House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited state house since Montana voters approved [[Montana Term Limits, Amendment CI-64 (1992)|CI-64 in 1992]].  C-64 created [[Article IV, Montana Constitution#Section 8|Section 8 of Article IV]] of the [[Montana Constitution]], which says that [[Montana State Representative]]s cannot serve 8 or more years in any 16-year period.  
  
There are 100 [[Montana State Representative]]s. 16 of them, or 16%, will be termed out in 2012.  Of them, 6 are [[Democratic]] and 10 are [[Republican]].  
+
There are 100 [[Montana State Representative]]s. 16 of them, or 16%, were termed out in 2012.  Of them, 6 were [[Democratic]] and 10 were [[Republican]].  
  
In addition to the 16 Montana state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Montana|8 Montana state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 16 Montana state representatives who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Montana|8 Montana state senators were also termed-out]].
 +
 
 +
Montana state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
Montana state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
 
  
 
'''Democrats (6):'''
 
'''Democrats (6):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Cynthia Hiner]]
 +
*[[Diane Sands]]
 +
*[[Frank Smith]]
 +
*[[Jon Sesso]]
 +
*[[Robyn Driscoll]]
 +
*[[Trudi Schmidt]]
  
category = Montana
 
category = Democratic Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=None listed yet
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
 
'''Republicans(10):'''
 
'''Republicans(10):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Donald Roberts]]
 
+
*[[Gary MacLaren]]
category = Montana
+
*[[Gordon Hendrick]]
category = Republican Party
+
*[[Harry Klock]]
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
*[[Janna Taylor]]
notnamespace = Template
+
*[[Kenneth Peterson]]
noresultsheader=None listed yet
+
*[[Mike Milburn]]
</dpl>
+
*[[Tom McGillvray]]
 +
*[[Walter McNutt]]
 +
*[[Wayne Stahl]]
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
Line 471: Line 493:
 
2010 was the first year that some [[Nevada State Representative]]s were ineligible to run for office because of the term limits law first passed in 1994.
 
2010 was the first year that some [[Nevada State Representative]]s were ineligible to run for office because of the term limits law first passed in 1994.
  
Nevada voters approved [[Nevada Term Limits Initiative (1996)|Question 9A in 1996]]. Question 9A was a second vote on a [[Nevada Term Limit Measure (1994)|term limits amendment first approved in 1994]].  Alone among the states with [[ballot initiative]]s, Nevada voters must approve a proposed constitutional amendment twice before it goes into the [[Nevada Constitution]].  The 1994 and 1996 votes cumulatively led to [[Article 4, Nevada Constitution#Section 3|Paragraph 2 of Section 3 of Article 4]] of the [[Nevada Constitution]], which says, "No person may be elected or appointed as a member of the Assembly who has served in that Office, or at the expiration of his current term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, from any district of this State."
+
Nevada voters approved [[Nevada State and Local Public Officer Term Limits, Question 9A (1996)|Question 9A in 1996]]. Question 9A was a second vote on a [[Nevada State and Local Public Officer Term Limits, Question 9 (1994)|term limits amendment first approved in 1994]].  Alone among the states with [[ballot initiative]]s, Nevada voters must approve a proposed constitutional amendment twice before it goes into the [[Nevada Constitution]].  The 1994 and 1996 votes cumulatively led to [[Article 4, Nevada Constitution#Section 3|Paragraph 2 of Section 3 of Article 4]] of the [[Nevada Constitution]], which says, "No person may be elected or appointed as a member of the Assembly who has served in that Office, or at the expiration of his current term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, from any district of this State."
  
1 [[Nevada State Representative]], a [[Democratic| Democrat]], is termed-out in 2012.  This is 2% of the state's 42 state representatives.
+
1 [[Nevada State Representative]], a [[Democratic| Democrat]], was termed-out in 2012.  This was 2% of the state's 42 state representatives.
  
In addition to the 1 Nevada state representative who is leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Nevada|4 Nevada state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 1 Nevada state representative who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Nevada|4 Nevada state senators were also termed-out]].
  
Nevada state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
The Nevada state representative whose seats was up for election in 2012 but was unable to run because of the state's term limits was:
  
 
'''Democrats (1):'''
 
'''Democrats (1):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[John Oceguera]]
 
+
category = Nevada
+
category = Democratic Party
+
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
notnamespace = Template
+
noresultsheader=None listed yet
+
</dpl>
+
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
Line 501: Line 516:
 
The [[Ohio House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited [[lower house|state house]] since [[Ohio]] voters approved [[Ohio State Legislative Term Limits Initiative (1992)|Ballot Issue 4]], an {{icafull}}, in [[Ohio 1992 ballot measures|1992]].  This amendment became part of [[Article II, Ohio Constitution#Section 2|Section 2 of Article II]] of the [[Ohio Constitution]] and limits the amount of time that an [[Ohio State Representative]] can stay in office to four 2-year terms, saying, "No person shall hold the office of State Representative for a period longer than four successive terms of two years. Terms shall be considered successive unless separated by a period of four or more years."
 
The [[Ohio House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited [[lower house|state house]] since [[Ohio]] voters approved [[Ohio State Legislative Term Limits Initiative (1992)|Ballot Issue 4]], an {{icafull}}, in [[Ohio 1992 ballot measures|1992]].  This amendment became part of [[Article II, Ohio Constitution#Section 2|Section 2 of Article II]] of the [[Ohio Constitution]] and limits the amount of time that an [[Ohio State Representative]] can stay in office to four 2-year terms, saying, "No person shall hold the office of State Representative for a period longer than four successive terms of two years. Terms shall be considered successive unless separated by a period of four or more years."
  
7 of Ohio's representatives are limited out in 2012; this represents 7% of Ohio's 99 state representatives.  Of them, 3 are [[Democratic]] and 4 are [[Republican]].
+
6 of [[Ohio]]'s representatives were termed out in 2012; this represents 6.06% of [[Ohio]]'s 99 state representatives.  Of them, 2 were [[Democratic]] and 4 were [[Republican]].
  
In addition to the 7 Ohio state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Ohio|2 Ohio state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 6 Ohio state representatives who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Ohio|1 Ohio state senator is also termed-out]].
  
Ohio state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
Ohio state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
'''Democrats (3):'''
+
'''Democrats (2):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Kenny Yuko]]
 +
*[[Lorraine Fende]]
  
category = Ohio
 
category = Democratic Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=None listed yet
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
Line 522: Line 532:
 
'''Republicans (4):'''
 
'''Republicans (4):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Courtney Combs]]
 
+
*[[Danny Bubp]]
category = Ohio
+
*[[Joe Uecker]]
category = Republican Party
+
*[[Lou Blessing, Jr.]]
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
notnamespace = Template
+
noresultsheader=None listed yet
+
</dpl>
+
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
Line 538: Line 544:
 
The [[Oklahoma House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited house of representatives since Oklahoma voters approved [[Oklahoma State Legislative Term Limits, State Question 632 (1990)|State Question 632 in 1990]], as an {{icafull}}.  This amendment became part of [[Article V, Oklahoma Constitution#Section 17A|Section 17A of Article V]] of the [[Oklahoma Constitution]] and limits the amount of time that an [[Oklahoma House of Representatives | Oklahoma State Representative]] can serve to a cumulative total of 12 years in either or both chambers of the [[Oklahoma State Legislature]].
 
The [[Oklahoma House of Representatives]] has been a term-limited house of representatives since Oklahoma voters approved [[Oklahoma State Legislative Term Limits, State Question 632 (1990)|State Question 632 in 1990]], as an {{icafull}}.  This amendment became part of [[Article V, Oklahoma Constitution#Section 17A|Section 17A of Article V]] of the [[Oklahoma Constitution]] and limits the amount of time that an [[Oklahoma House of Representatives | Oklahoma State Representative]] can serve to a cumulative total of 12 years in either or both chambers of the [[Oklahoma State Legislature]].
  
6 of Oklahoma's 101 state representatives, or 6%, will be termed out in 2012.  Of them, 2 are [[Democratic]] and 4 are [[Republican]].
+
6 of Oklahoma's 101 state representatives, or 6%, were termed out in 2012.  Of them, 2 were [[Democratic]] and 4 were [[Republican]].
  
In addition to the 6 Oklahoma state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Oklahoma|2 Oklahoma state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 6 Oklahoma state representatives who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#Oklahoma|2 Oklahoma state senators were also termed-out]].
 +
 
 +
Oklahoma state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
Oklahoma state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
 
  
 
'''Democrats (2):'''
 
'''Democrats (2):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Paul D. Roan]]
 
+
*[[Purcy Walker]]
category = Oklahoma
+
category = Democratic Party
+
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
notnamespace = Template
+
noresultsheader=None listed yet
+
</dpl>
+
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
Line 559: Line 560:
 
'''Republicans (4):'''
 
'''Republicans (4):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Charles Key]]
 
+
*[[Kris Steele]]
category = Oklahoma
+
*[[Ron Peters]]
category = Republican Party
+
*[[Sue Tibbs]]
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
notnamespace = Template
+
noresultsheader=None listed yet
+
</dpl>
+
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
Line 577: Line 574:
 
The [[South Dakota State Legislature]] has tried on more than one occasion, each time unsuccessfully, to persuade the state's voters to repeal term limits.  The most recent such failed attempt was when [[South Dakota Repeal Term Limits, Constitutional Amendment J (2008)|Amendment J]] lost in 2008 by 75-25%.
 
The [[South Dakota State Legislature]] has tried on more than one occasion, each time unsuccessfully, to persuade the state's voters to repeal term limits.  The most recent such failed attempt was when [[South Dakota Repeal Term Limits, Constitutional Amendment J (2008)|Amendment J]] lost in 2008 by 75-25%.
  
7 of South Dakota's 70 state representatives, or 10%, will be termed out in 2012.  Of them, 2 are [[Democratic]] and 5 are [[Republican]].
+
7 of South Dakota's 70 state representatives, or 10%, were termed out in 2012.  Of them, 2 were [[Democratic]] and 5 were [[Republican]].
  
In addition to the 7 South Dakota state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#South Dakota|3 South Dakota state senators are also termed-out]].
+
In addition to the 7 South Dakota state representatives who left office because of term limits, [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012#South Dakota|3 South Dakota state senators were also termed-out]].
  
South Dakota state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
+
South Dakota state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:
  
 
'''Democrats (2):'''
 
'''Democrats (2):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[H. Paul Dennert]]
 +
*[[Steve Street]]
  
category = South Dakota
 
category = Democratic Party
 
category = Representative termed out, 2012
 
notnamespace = Template
 
noresultsheader=None listed yet
 
</dpl>
 
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
 
'''Republican (5):'''
 
'''Republican (5):'''
 
{{colbegin|3}}
 
{{colbegin|3}}
<dpl>
+
*[[Charles Turbiville]]
 
+
*[[Jamie Boomgarden]]
category = South Dakota
+
*[[Roger Hunt]]
category = Republican Party
+
*[[Thomas Brunner]]
category = Representative termed out, 2012
+
*[[Valentine Rausch]]
notnamespace = Template
+
noresultsheader=None listed yet
+
</dpl>
+
 
{{colend}}
 
{{colend}}
  
==See Also==
+
==See also==
  
 
* [[State legislatures with term limits]]
 
* [[State legislatures with term limits]]

Revision as of 15:50, 10 July 2013

2014
2011
Term Limits
SLP badge.png
Impact of Term Limits by Year
2010201120122014
State senates
ArizonaArkansasCalifornia
ColoradoFloridaMaine
MissouriMontana
NebraskaNevadaOhio
OklahomaSouth Dakota
State houses
ArizonaArkansasCalifornia
ColoradoFloridaMaine
MichiganMissouriMontana
NevadaOhio
OklahomaSouth Dakota
State legislatures with term limits
Term limits on the ballot
::See also: State legislature elections and Impact of term limits on state legislative elections
Elections of state representatives in 13 states with state legislative term limits took place on November 6, 2012. The 13 states where state legislative elections are impacted by term limits were close to 30% of the 42 states where state legislative elections of lower house members took place in 2012.

15 states have state legislative term limits, but Louisiana did not hold a state house election in 2012 and Nebraska does not have a lower house.

In the 13 states, 172 state representatives were ineligible to run for re-election in November because of term limit laws in their state.

This includes:

  • 87 incumbent Democrats
  • 85 incumbent Republicans

The 172 state representatives who were termed-out represent 13.6% of the 1,263 total seats up for election in November in the 13 term-limited states with elections in November 2010.

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012

Differential impact on parties

Going into the November 2012 election, the Democratic Party was the majority party in 4 of the 13 state houses with term limits. The Republican Party was the majority party in 9 of the term-limited state houses.

  • In 7 states, the term limits axe fell more heavily on incumbent Republicans: Arizona, Florida, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oklahoma and South Dakota. In all of these states, the current majority party was also the Republican Party.
  • In 6 states, the term limits axe fell more heavily on incumbent Democrats: Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Michigan, and Nevada. In 3 of these states, the current majority party was also the Democratic Party. These states include Arkansas, California, and Nevada. In 3 of the 6 states where term limits affected incumbent Democrats more heavily, the current majority party was Republican. These states were Colorado, Maine and Michigan.

Overview chart

Note: The figures in Column 5 ("Seats impacted by term limits") only reflects current members of state houses who were unable to run for re-election to their state's assembly in 2010 because of term limits. In some cases, including Ohio, state representatives who would have been unable to run for re-election in November resigned earlier in the year or were appointed to other positions. Representatives who resigned, and were not current members of their state houses, are not counted in these figures.

Houses with limits Majority party Seats in house Up for election in 2012 Seats impacted by term limits Party with most losses


Arizona: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 60 60 0 Democratic Party + 5 Republican Party = 5 Republican Party
Arkansas: (House), (2012 elections) Democratic Party 100 100 19 Democratic Party + 4 Republican Party = 23 Democratic Party
California: (Assembly), (2012 elections) Democratic Party 80 80 16 Democratic Party + 5 Republican Party = 21 Democratic Party
Colorado: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 65 65 5 Democratic Party + 4 Republican Party = 9 Democratic Party
Florida: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 120 120 2 Democratic Party + 10 Republican Party = 12 Republican Party
Maine: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 153 153 14 Democratic Party + 12 Republican Party = 26 Democratic Party
Michigan: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 110 110 9 Democratic Party + 5 Republican Party = 14 Democratic Party
Missouri: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 163 163 8 Democratic Party + 17 Republican Party = 25 Republican Party
Montana: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 100 100 6 Democratic Party + 10 Republican Party = 16 Republican Party
Nevada: (House), (2012 elections) Democratic Party 42 42 1 Democratic Party + 0 Republican Party = 1 Democratic Party
Ohio: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 99 99 3 Democratic Party + 4 Republican Party = 7 Republican Party
Oklahoma: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 101 101 2 Democratic Party + 4 Republican Party = 6 Republican Party
South Dakota: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 70 70 2 Democratic Party + 5 Republican Party = 7 Republican Party
Totals: (3) Democratic Party (10) Republican Party 1,263 1,263 87 Democratic Party + 85 Republican Party = 172 6 Democratic Party, 7 Republican Party

Impact in specific states

Legend:
Democratic Party = Democratic Party is majority partyRepublican Party = Republican Party is majority party



Republican Party Arizona

Arizona
See also: Arizona House of Representatives elections, 2012

All of Arizona's 60 state representative seats were upfor election on November 6. Arizona representatives serve two-year terms with a four-term/eight-year limit that was imposed by Proposition 107 in 1992. Arizona's term limits apply to parts of terms and not just full terms.

In the 2012 state house elections, 3 representatives, or 8.3% of the 60-member House, who were first elected in 2004 (0 Democratic state representatives and 3 GOP state representatives) could not run for re-election.

In addition to the 3 Arizona state representatives who left office because of Arizona's term limits, 2 state senators are also leaving.

Arizona state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (0):

None

Republicans (3):

Democratic Party Arkansas

Arkansas
See also: Arkansas House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Arkansas House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Arkansas voters approved the Arkansas Term Limits Initiative in 1992 as an initiated constitutional amendment.

There are 100 Arkansas State Representatives. In 2012, 23 of them (23%) who are current members were ineligible to run again in November (19 Democratic state representatives and 4 Republican state representatives).

In addition to the 23 state representatives who left office because of term limits, 10 Arkansas state senators were also termed-out.

Arkansas state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (19):

Republicans (4):

Democratic Party California

California
See also: California State Assembly elections, 2012

The California State Assembly has been a term-limited state house since California voters approved Proposition 140 in 1990. Under the terms of Proposition 140, the members of the state assembly can serve no more than three 2-year terms in the state assembly. This is a lifetime limit, as is the case in five other states with state legislative term limits.

There are 80 members in the state assembly, and 22 of them (27.5%) termed-out in 2012. Of them, 17 were Democratic and 5 were Republican.

In addition to the 22 California state representatives who left office because of term limits, 6 California state senators were also termed-out.

California state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (17):

Republicans (5):

Republican Party Colorado

Colorado
See also: Colorado House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Colorado House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Colorado voters approved Issue 5 in 1990. The affirmative vote by Colorado's electorate in Issue 5 altered Section 3 of Article V on the Colorado Constitution to say that Colorado State Representatives could serve no more than four 2-year terms in office.

There are 65 representatives in the Colorado house. 8 of them, or 12.31%, could not run in 2012 because of term limits. Of these 8, 4 were Democratic and 4 were Republican

In addition to the 8 Colorado state representatives who left office because of term limits, 6 Colorado state senators were also termed-out.

Colorado state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (4):

Republicans (4):

Republican Party Florida

Florida
See also: Florida House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Florida House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Florida voters approved Amendment 9 in 1992. Amendment 9 altered Article VI, section 4 of the Florida Constitution to impose a maximum of four 2-year terms on Florida State Representatives.

There are 120 representatives in the Florida House of Representatives. 12 of them, or 10%, were termed-out in 2012. Of these 12, 2 were Democratic and 10 were Republican.

In addition to the 12 Florida state representatives who left office because of term limits, 10 Florida state senators were also termed-out.

Florida state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (2):

Republicans (10):

Republican Party Maine

Maine
See also: Maine House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Maine House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Maine voters approved Question 1 in 1993. Under this law, state representatives can serve no more than four consecutive 2-year terms. The Maine State Legislature tried, unsuccessfully, in 2007 to get the state's voters to extend the number of years they could consecutively serve in office by putting the Maine Term Limits Extension act on the ballot. Voters overwhelmingly (67-33%) rejected it.

There are 153 state representatives in Maine. 26 of them, or 17%, were termed out in 2012. Of these 26, 14 were Democratic and 12 were Republican.

In addition to the 26 Maine state representatives who left office because of term limits, 10 Maine state senators were also termed-out.

Maine state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (14):

Republicans (12):

Republican Party Michigan

Michigan
See also: Michigan House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Michigan House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Michigan voters approved Proposal B in 1992. Proposal B created Section 54 of Article IV of the Michigan Constitution. It says that state representatives are limited to 3 two-year terms. As with five other states, this is a lifetime limit.

14 of Michigan's 110 representatives, or 12.7%, were termed-out in 2012. Of them, 9 were Democratic and 5 were Republican.

Michigan state representative whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (9):

Republicans (5):

Republican Party Missouri

Missouri
See also: Missouri House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Missouri House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Missouri voters approved Amendment 12 in 1992. Amendment 12 created Section 8 of Article III of the Missouri Constitution, limiting members of the state house to 4 2-year terms. As with five other states, this is a lifetime limit. (Section 8 was later amended by Amendment 3 in 2002 so that it does not apply to partial terms.)

There were 25 state representatives terming out in 2012, or 15.3% of the 163 members of the chamber. Of them, 8 were Democratic and 17 were Republican.

In addition to the 25 Missouri state representatives who left office because of term limits, 9 Missouri state senators were also termed-out.

Missouri state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (8):

Republicans (17):

Republican Party Montana

Montana
See also: Montana House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Montana House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Montana voters approved CI-64 in 1992. C-64 created Section 8 of Article IV of the Montana Constitution, which says that Montana State Representatives cannot serve 8 or more years in any 16-year period.

There are 100 Montana State Representatives. 16 of them, or 16%, were termed out in 2012. Of them, 6 were Democratic and 10 were Republican.

In addition to the 16 Montana state representatives who left office because of term limits, 8 Montana state senators were also termed-out.

Montana state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:


Democrats (6):

Republicans(10):

Democratic Party Nevada

Nevada
See also: Nevada State Assembly elections, 2012

2010 was the first year that some Nevada State Representatives were ineligible to run for office because of the term limits law first passed in 1994.

Nevada voters approved Question 9A in 1996. Question 9A was a second vote on a term limits amendment first approved in 1994. Alone among the states with ballot initiatives, Nevada voters must approve a proposed constitutional amendment twice before it goes into the Nevada Constitution. The 1994 and 1996 votes cumulatively led to Paragraph 2 of Section 3 of Article 4 of the Nevada Constitution, which says, "No person may be elected or appointed as a member of the Assembly who has served in that Office, or at the expiration of his current term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, from any district of this State."

1 Nevada State Representative, a Democrat, was termed-out in 2012. This was 2% of the state's 42 state representatives.

In addition to the 1 Nevada state representative who left office because of term limits, 4 Nevada state senators were also termed-out.

The Nevada state representative whose seats was up for election in 2012 but was unable to run because of the state's term limits was:

Democrats (1):

Republicans (0):

None

Republican Party Ohio

Ohio
See also: Ohio House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Ohio House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Ohio voters approved Ballot Issue 4, an initiated constitutional amendment, in 1992. This amendment became part of Section 2 of Article II of the Ohio Constitution and limits the amount of time that an Ohio State Representative can stay in office to four 2-year terms, saying, "No person shall hold the office of State Representative for a period longer than four successive terms of two years. Terms shall be considered successive unless separated by a period of four or more years."

6 of Ohio's representatives were termed out in 2012; this represents 6.06% of Ohio's 99 state representatives. Of them, 2 were Democratic and 4 were Republican.

In addition to the 6 Ohio state representatives who left office because of term limits, 1 Ohio state senator is also termed-out.

Ohio state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (2):


Republicans (4):

Republican Party Oklahoma

Oklahoma
See also: Oklahoma House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Oklahoma House of Representatives has been a term-limited house of representatives since Oklahoma voters approved State Question 632 in 1990, as an initiated constitutional amendment. This amendment became part of Section 17A of Article V of the Oklahoma Constitution and limits the amount of time that an Oklahoma State Representative can serve to a cumulative total of 12 years in either or both chambers of the Oklahoma State Legislature.

6 of Oklahoma's 101 state representatives, or 6%, were termed out in 2012. Of them, 2 were Democratic and 4 were Republican.

In addition to the 6 Oklahoma state representatives who left office because of term limits, 2 Oklahoma state senators were also termed-out.

Oklahoma state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:


Democrats (2):


Republicans (4):

Republican Party South Dakota

South Dakota
See also: South Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2012

The South Dakota House of Representatives has been a term-limited house of representatives since South Dakota voters approved Ballot Issue A in 1992, an initiated constitutional amendment. This amendment became part of Section 6 of Article III of the South Dakota Constitution and limits the amount of time that a South Dakota Representative can stay in office to no more than four consecutive 2-year terms.

The South Dakota State Legislature has tried on more than one occasion, each time unsuccessfully, to persuade the state's voters to repeal term limits. The most recent such failed attempt was when Amendment J lost in 2008 by 75-25%.

7 of South Dakota's 70 state representatives, or 10%, were termed out in 2012. Of them, 2 were Democratic and 5 were Republican.

In addition to the 7 South Dakota state representatives who left office because of term limits, 3 South Dakota state senators were also termed-out.

South Dakota state representatives whose seats were up for election in 2012 but who were unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (2):

Republican (5):

See also

References