Difference between revisions of "Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2012"

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==See Also==
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Revision as of 15:53, 5 July 2011

See also: State legislature elections and Impact of term limits on state legislative elections
Elections of state representatives in 13 states with state legislative term limits will take place on November 6, 2012. The 13 states where state legislative elections are impacted by term limits are close to 30% of the 42 states where state legislative elections of lower house members will take place in 2012.

15 states have state legislative term limits, but Louisiana is not holding a state house election in 2012 and Nebraska does not have a lower house.

In the 13 states, 172 state representatives were ineligible to run for re-election in November because of term limit laws in their state.

This includes:

  • 87 incumbent Democrats
  • 85 incumbent Republicans

The 172 state representatives who are termed-out represent 13.6% of the 1,263 total seats up for election in November in the 13 term-limited states with elections in November 2010.

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012

Differential impact on parties

Going into the November 2012 election, the Democratic Party is the majority party in 4 of the 13 state houses with term limits. The Republican Party is the majority party in 9 of the term-limited state houses.

  • In 7 states, the term limits axe falls more heavily on incumbent Republicans: Arizona, Florida, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oklahoma and South Dakota. In all of these states, the current majority party is also the Republican Party.
  • In 6 states, the term limits axe falls more heavily on incumbent Democrats: Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Michigan, and Nevada. In 4 of these states, the current majority party is also the Democratic Party. These states include Arkansas, California, Maine, and Nevada. In 2 of the 6 states where term limits affect incumbent Democrats more heavily, the current majority party is Republican. These states are Colorado and Michigan.

Overview chart

Note: The figures in Column 5 ("Seats impacted by term limits") only reflects current members of state houses who are unable to run for re-election to their state's assembly in 2010 because of term limits. In some cases, including Ohio, state representatives who would have been unable to run for re-election in November resigned earlier in the year or were appointed to other positions. Representatives who resigned, and are not current members of their state houses, are not counted in these figures.

Houses with limits Majority party Seats in house Up for election in 2012 Seats impacted by term limits Party with most losses


Arizona: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 60 60 0 Democratic Party + 5 Republican Party = 5 Republican Party
Arkansas: (House), (2012 elections) Democratic Party 100 100 19 Democratic Party + 4 Republican Party = 23 Democratic Party
California: (Assembly), (2012 elections) Democratic Party 80 80 16 Democratic Party + 5 Republican Party = 21 Democratic Party
Colorado: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 65 65 5 Democratic Party + 4 Republican Party = 9 Democratic Party
Florida: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 120 120 2 Democratic Party + 10 Republican Party = 12 Republican Party
Maine: (House), (2012 elections) Democratic Party 153 153 14 Democratic Party + 12 Republican Party = 26 Democratic Party
Michigan: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 110 110 9 Democratic Party + 5 Republican Party = 14 Democratic Party
Missouri: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 163 163 8 Democratic Party + 17 Republican Party = 25 Republican Party
Montana: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 100 100 6 Democratic Party + 10 Republican Party = 16 Republican Party
Nevada: (House), (2012 elections) Democratic Party 42 42 1 Democratic Party + 0 Republican Party = 1 Democratic Party
Ohio: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 99 99 3 Democratic Party + 4 Republican Party = 7 Republican Party
Oklahoma: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 101 101 2 Democratic Party + 4 Republican Party = 6 Republican Party
South Dakota: (House), (2012 elections) Republican Party 70 70 2 Democratic Party + 5 Republican Party = 7 Republican Party
Totals: (4) Democratic Party (9) Republican Party 1,263 1,263 87 Democratic Party + 85 Republican Party = 172 6 Democratic Party, 7 Republican Party

Impact in specific states

Legend:
Democratic Party = Democratic Party is majority partyRepublican Party = Republican Party is majority party




Republican Party Arizona

Arizona
See also: Arizona House of Representatives elections, 2012

All of Arizona's 60 state representative seats are up for election on November 6. Arizona representatives serve two-year terms with a four-term/eight-year limit that was imposed by Proposition 107 in 1992. Arizona's term limits apply to parts of terms and not just full terms.

In the 2012 state house elections, 5 representatives, or 8.3% of the 60-member House, who were first elected in 2004 (0 Democratic state representatives and 5 GOP state representatives) cannot run for re-election.

In addition to the 5 Arizona state representatives who are leaving office because of Arizona's term limits, 2 state senators are also leaving.

Arizona state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (0):

None

Republicans (5):



Democratic Party Arkansas

Arkansas
See also: Arkansas House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Arkansas House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Arkansas voters approved the Arkansas Term Limits Initiative in 1992 as an initiated constitutional amendment.

There are 100 Arkansas State Representatives. In 2012, 23 of them (23%) who are current members were ineligible to run again in November (19 Democratic state representatives and 4 Republican state representatives).

In addition to the 23 state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, 10 Arkansas state senators are also termed-out.

Arkansas state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (19):


Republicans (4):


Democratic Party California

California
See also: California State Assembly elections, 2012

The California State Assembly has been a term-limited state house since California voters approved Proposition 140 in 1990. Under the terms of Proposition 140, the members of the state assembly can serve no more than three 2-year terms in the state assembly. This is a lifetime limit, as is the case in five other states with state legislative term limits.

There are 80 members in the state assembly, and 21 of them (26.25%) termed-out in 2012. Of them, 16 are Democratic and 5 are Republican.

In addition to the 21 California state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, 9 California state senators are also termed-out.

California state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (16):


Republicans (5):


Republican Party Colorado

Colorado
See also: Colorado House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Colorado House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Colorado voters approved Issue 5 in 1990. The affirmative vote by Colorado's electorate in Issue 5 altered Section 3 of Article V on the Colorado Constitution to say that Colorado State Representatives could serve no more than four 2-year terms in office.

There are 65 representatives in the Colorado house. 9 of them, or 13.8%, can't run in 2012 because of term limits. Of these 9, 5 are Democratic and 4 are Republican

In addition to the 9 Colorado state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, 6 Colorado state senators are also termed-out.

Colorado state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (5):


Republicans (4):


Republican Party Florida

Florida
See also: Florida House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Florida House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Florida voters approved Amendment 9 in 1992. Amendment 9 altered Article VI, section 4 of the Florida Constitution to impose a maximum of four 2-year terms on Florida State Representatives.

There are 120 representatives in the Florida House of Representatives. 12 of them, or 10%, are termed-out in 2012. Of these 12, 2 are Democratic and 10 are Republican.

In addition to the 12 Florida state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, 10 Florida state senators are also termed-out.

Florida state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (2):


Republicans (10):


Democratic Party Maine

Maine
See also: Maine House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Maine House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Maine voters approved Question 1 in 1993. Under this law, state representatives can serve no more than four consecutive 2-year terms. The Maine State Legislature tried, unsuccessfully, in 2007 to get the state's voters to extend the number of years they could consecutively serve in office by putting the Maine Term Limits Extension act on the ballot. Voters overwhelmingly (67-33%) rejected it.

There are 153 state representatives in Maine. 26 of them, or 17%, are termed out in 2012. Of these 26, 14 are Democratic and 12 are Republican.

In addition to the 26 Maine state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, 10 Maine state senators are also termed-out.

Maine state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (14):


Republicans (12):



Republican Party Michigan

Michigan
See also: Michigan House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Michigan House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Michigan voters approved Proposal B in 1992. Proposal B created Section 54 of Article IV of the Michigan Constitution. It says that state representatives are limited to 3 two-year terms. As with five other states, this is a lifetime limit.

14 of Michigan's 110 representatives, or 12.7%, are termed-out in 2012. Of them, 9 are Democratic and 5 are Republican.

Michigan state representative whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (9):


Republicans (5):


Republican Party Missouri

Missouri
See also: Missouri House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Missouri House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Missouri voters approved Amendment 12 in 1992. Amendment 12 created Section 8 of Article III of the Missouri Constitution, limiting members of the state house to 4 2-year terms. As with five other states, this is a lifetime limit. (Section 8 was later amended by Amendment 3 in 2002 so that it does not apply to partial terms.)

There are 25 state representatives terming out in 2012, or 15.3% of the 163 members of the chamber. Of them, 8 are Democratic and 17 are Republican.

In addition to the 25 Missouri state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, 9 Missouri state senators are also termed-out.

Missouri state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (8):


Republicans (17):


Republican Party Montana

Montana
See also: Montana House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Montana House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Montana voters approved C-64 in 1992. C-64 created Section 8 of Article IV of the Montana Constitution, which says that Montana State Representatives cannot serve 8 or more years in any 16-year period.

There are 100 Montana State Representatives. 16 of them, or 16%, will be termed out in 2012. Of them, 6 are Democratic and 10 are Republican.

In addition to the 16 Montana state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, 8 Montana state senators are also termed-out.

Montana state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (6):


Republicans(10):


Democratic Party Nevada

Nevada
See also: Nevada State Assembly elections, 2012

2010 was the first year that some Nevada State Representatives were ineligible to run for office because of the term limits law first passed in 1994.

Nevada voters approved Question 9A in 1996. Question 9A was a second vote on a term limits amendment first approved in 1994. Alone among the states with ballot initiatives, Nevada voters must approve a proposed constitutional amendment twice before it goes into the Nevada Constitution. The 1994 and 1996 votes cumulatively led to Paragraph 2 of Section 3 of Article 4 of the Nevada Constitution, which says, "No person may be elected or appointed as a member of the Assembly who has served in that Office, or at the expiration of his current term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, from any district of this State."

1 Nevada State Representative, a Democrat, is termed-out in 2012. This is 2% of the state's 42 state representatives.

In addition to the 1 Nevada state representative who is leaving office because of term limits, 4 Nevada state senators are also termed-out.

Nevada state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (1):


Republicans (0):

None

Republican Party Ohio

Ohio
See also: Ohio House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Ohio House of Representatives has been a term-limited state house since Ohio voters approved Ballot Issue 4, an initiated constitutional amendment, in 1992. This amendment became part of Section 2 of Article II of the Ohio Constitution and limits the amount of time that an Ohio State Representative can stay in office to four 2-year terms, saying, "No person shall hold the office of State Representative for a period longer than four successive terms of two years. Terms shall be considered successive unless separated by a period of four or more years."

7 of Ohio's representatives are limited out in 2012; this represents 7% of Ohio's 99 state representatives. Of them, 3 are Democratic and 4 are Republican.

In addition to the 7 Ohio state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, 2 Ohio state senators are also termed-out.

Ohio state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (3):



Republicans (4):


Republican Party Oklahoma

Oklahoma
See also: Oklahoma House of Representatives elections, 2012

The Oklahoma House of Representatives has been a term-limited house of representatives since Oklahoma voters approved State Question 632 in 1990, as an initiated constitutional amendment. This amendment became part of Section 17A of Article V of the Oklahoma Constitution and limits the amount of time that an Oklahoma State Representative can serve to a cumulative total of 12 years in either or both chambers of the Oklahoma State Legislature.

6 of Oklahoma's 101 state representatives, or 6%, will be termed out in 2012. Of them, 2 are Democratic and 4 are Republican.

In addition to the 6 Oklahoma state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, 2 Oklahoma state senators are also termed-out.

Oklahoma state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (2):



Republicans (4):


Republican Party South Dakota

South Dakota
See also: South Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2012

The South Dakota House of Representatives has been a term-limited house of representatives since South Dakota voters approved Ballot Issue A in 1992, an initiated constitutional amendment. This amendment became part of Section 6 of Article III of the South Dakota Constitution and limits the amount of time that a South Dakota Representative can stay in office to no more than four consecutive 2-year terms.

The South Dakota State Legislature has tried on more than one occasion, each time unsuccessfully, to persuade the state's voters to repeal term limits. The most recent such failed attempt was when Amendment J lost in 2008 by 75-25%.

7 of South Dakota's 70 state representatives, or 10%, will be termed out in 2012. Of them, 2 are Democratic and 5 are Republican.

In addition to the 7 South Dakota state representatives who are leaving office because of term limits, 3 South Dakota state senators are also termed-out.

South Dakota state representatives whose seats are up for election in 2012 but who are unable to run because of the state's term limits are:

Democrats (2):


Republican (5):


See Also

References