Iowa signature requirements

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Signature requirements
(By state)

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This page details Iowa signature requirements. In many states, the signatures of registered voters must be collected to place candidates or initiatives on the ballot. However, for candidates, filing fees are sometimes required or accepted in lieu of signatures.

Federal offices

U.S. Senate

Partisan candidates must collect signatures equal to 1/2% (0.5%) of their party's voters. Of this total, candidates must collect signatures equal to 1% of party voters in each of ten counties. The number of voters is calculated as the total vote cast in favor of a party's candidate for Governor or President in the last general election (elections for these offices are offset by two years). Signers need not be members of the candidate's political party.[1]

Candidates may also be nominated by non-party political organizations (NPPOs). Such candidates are nominated for the general election by convention. NPPOs are not required to file for state recognition. However, nominating conventions for statewide office must be attended by 250 registered voters representing 25 of the state's counties.[2]

NPPO and unaffiliated candidates may also qualify for the ballot by petition. Statewide candidates must collect 1500 total signatures gathered from at least 10 different counties.[3]

U.S. House

Partisan candidates must collect signatures equal to 1% of their party's voters within the relevant district. Of this total, candidates must collect signatures equal to 2% of party voters in each of ten counties. The number of voters is calculated as the total vote cast in favor of a party's candidate for Governor or President in the district during the last general election (elections for these offices are offset by two years). Signers need not be members of the candidate's political party.[1]

Candidates may also be nominated by non-party political organizations (NPPOs). Such candidates are nominated for the general election by convention. NPPOs are not required to file for state recognition. However, nominating conventions for U.S. Congress must be attended by 50 registered voters representing one-half of the district's counties.[2]

NPPO and unaffiliated candidates may also qualify for the ballot by petition. Congressional candidates must collect 375 total signatures (1500 divided by the number of congressional districts).[3]

Filing deadlines

2012

See also: Signature requirements and deadlines for 2012 state government elections

Partisan candidates qualifying for primary elections had to file between February 27 and March 16, 2012. NPPO nominees and unaffiliated candidates qualifying for the general election had to file between July 30 and August 17, 2012.[4][5]

State offices

Statewide executive offices

Partisan candidates for Governor must collect signatures equal to 1/2% (0.5%) of their party's voters. Of this total, candidates must collect signatures equal to 1% of party voters in each of ten counties. The number of voters is calculated as the total vote cast in favor of a party's candidate for Governor or President in the last general election (elections for these offices are offset by two years). Signers need not be members of the candidate's political party.[1]

Partisan candidates for other statewide offices must collect 1,000 signatures. Of this total, at least 50 signatures must be gathered from each of 10 counties.[1]

Candidates may also be nominated by non-party political organizations (NPPOs). Such candidates are nominated for the general election by convention. NPPOs are not required to file for state recognition. However, nominating conventions for statewide office must be attended by 250 registered voters representing 25 of the state's counties.[2]

NPPO and unaffiliated candidates may also qualify for the ballot by petition. Statewide candidates must collect 1500 total signatures gathered from at least 10 different counties.[3]

State legislature

Partisan candidates for Senate must collect 100 signatures. Candidates for House must collect 50 signatures.[1]

Candidates may also be nominated by non-party political organizations (NPPOs). Such candidates are nominated for the general election by convention. NPPOs are not required to file for state recognition. Nominating conventions for Senate must be attended by 20 registered voters representing one-half of the district's counties. Nominating conventions for House must be attended by 10 registered voters representing one-half of the district's counties.[2]

NPPO and unaffiliated candidates may also qualify for the ballot by petition. State Senate candidates must collect 100 total signatures, and House candidates must collect 50.[3]

Filing deadlines

2012

See also: Signature requirements and deadlines for 2012 state government elections

Partisan candidates qualifying for primary elections had to file between February 27 and March 16, 2012. NPPO nominees and unaffiliated candidates qualifying for the general election had to file between July 30 and August 17, 2012.[4][5]

Ballot measures

Iowa is one of the 24 states that do not have initiative and referendum.

See also

External links

References