Difference between revisions of "John Adler"

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{{tnr}}'''John Adler''' was a [[Democratic]] member of the [[U.S. House]] representing the 3rd district of [[New Jersey]].
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{{tnr}}'''John Adler''' was a [[Democratic]] member of the [[U.S. House]] representing the 3rd District of [[New Jersey]].
  
 
== Voting Record ==
 
== Voting Record ==

Revision as of 16:41, 19 December 2013


John Adler
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U.S. House, New Jersey, District 3
Former member
In office
January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2011
PartyDemocratic
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 2010
Term limitsN/A
Personal
BirthdayApril 4, 2011
Place of birthPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania
ProfessionAttorney
ReligionJudaism
John Adler was a Democratic member of the U.S. House representing the 3rd District of New Jersey.

Voting Record

Frequency of Voting with Democratic Leadership

According to a July 2010 analysis of 1,357 votes cast from January 1, 2009 to June 16, 2010, Adler has voted with the House Democratic leadership 90.7% of the time.[1] That same analysis reported that he also voted with party leadership 90% of the time in 2010.

Washington Post Analysis

A separate analysis from The Washington Post from July 23, 2010, concluded that he votes 91.1% of the time with a majority of Democrats in the House of Representatives.[2]

Specific votes

Rep. Adler voted for the stimulus bill.[3] 57% of U.S. voters believe that the stimulus has either hurt the economy (36%) or had no impact (21%). 38% believe the stimulus helped the economy. [4]

Adler also voted in favor of the "Cash for Clunkers" bill.[5] According to a June 2009 Rasmussen Reports poll, 54% of likely U.S. voters opposed Cash for Clunkers, while 35% supported it.[6]

Adler supported the "Cap and Trade" bill.[7] Just after the bill’s passage, 42% of likely U.S. voters said that cap and trade would hurt the economy, while 19% believed it would help. 15% said that the bill would have no impact.[8]

References