Difference between revisions of "Kentucky elections, 2013"

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(June 25, 2013 State House update)
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'''State House District 56'''
 
'''State House District 56'''
 
::''See also: [[Kentucky state legislative special elections, 2013]]
 
::''See also: [[Kentucky state legislative special elections, 2013]]
Rep. [[Carl Rollins, II]] (D) resigned on April 24 to take a job with the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority. A special election has been called for '''June 25, 2013'''. Candidates were chosen by party leaders instead of in primaries.<ref>[http://www.lex18.com/news/special-election-first-test-of-military-voting-law-330599/ ''lex18.com'', "Special Election First Test Of Military Voting Law," April 28, 2013]</ref><ref>[http://www.kentucky.com/2013/04/29/2620113/democrats-choose-woodford-party.html ''kentucky.com'', "Democrats choose Woodford party leader to run for vacant Central Kentucky House seat," April 29, 2013]</ref><ref>[http://www.kentucky.com/2013/04/30/2621533/kentucky-republicans-choose-lyen.html ''kentucky.com'', "Kentucky Republicans choose Lyen Crews to run in special election for House 56th District seat," May 1, 2013]</ref>
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Rep. [[Carl Rollins, II]] (D) resigned on April 24 to take a job with the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority. A special election took place on '''June 25, 2013''', which [[James L. Kay II]] won. Candidates were chosen by party leaders instead of in primaries.<ref>[http://www.lex18.com/news/special-election-first-test-of-military-voting-law-330599/ ''lex18.com'', "Special Election First Test Of Military Voting Law," April 28, 2013]</ref><ref>[http://www.kentucky.com/2013/04/29/2620113/democrats-choose-woodford-party.html ''kentucky.com'', "Democrats choose Woodford party leader to run for vacant Central Kentucky House seat," April 29, 2013]</ref><ref>[http://www.kentucky.com/2013/04/30/2621533/kentucky-republicans-choose-lyen.html ''kentucky.com'', "Kentucky Republicans choose Lyen Crews to run in special election for House 56th District seat," May 1, 2013]</ref>
:: ''Related: [[State legislative special elections, 2013|See election information here]].''
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:: ''Related: [[State legislative special elections, 2013|See election results here]].''
 
=February 12, 2013=
 
=February 12, 2013=
 
'''State House District 52'''
 
'''State House District 52'''

Revision as of 14:02, 26 June 2013

2014
2012


Contents
1 2013 elections
1.1 Special elections
1.2 Elections by date
2 Voting in Kentucky
2.1 Important voting information
2.2 Voting absentee
2.3 Voting early
3 Elections Performance Index
4 See also
5 References



Kentucky

Kentucky election information for 2013 is listed below.

On the 2013 ballot
No regularly scheduled elections in Kentucky.
Exceptions include special elections.
Find current election news and links here.
U.S. Senate Defeatedd
U.S. House Defeatedd
State Executives Defeatedd
State Senate Defeatedd
State House Approveda
Ballot measures Defeatedd
Click here for all
November 5, 2013
Election Results

2013 elections

Special elections

There are two special elections scheduled for the state of Kentucky in 2013.

Elections by date

[edit]

State House District 56

See also: Kentucky state legislative special elections, 2013

Rep. Carl Rollins, II (D) resigned on April 24 to take a job with the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority. A special election took place on June 25, 2013, which James L. Kay II won. Candidates were chosen by party leaders instead of in primaries.[1][2][3]

Related: See election results here.

State House District 52

See also: Kentucky state legislative special elections, 2013.

Sara Beth Gregory (R) won election to the Kentucky State Senate in a special election in December 2012. A few weeks earlier she won re-election to the Kentucky House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. A special election was held on February 12, 2013 to fill the vacant District 52 House seat, which Ken Upchurch won.[4][5][6]

Related: See election results here.

Voting in Kentucky

See also: Voting in Kentucky
Voting Absentee Early Map.jpg

Important voting information

  • Kentucky uses a closed primary system, meaning voters must register with a party to be able to vote in their primary election.
  • Registration must be 28 days prior to the election.
  • As of July 2014, Kentucky is one of the 35 states that have not implemented online voter registration.

Voting absentee

See also: Absentee voting by state

For information about eligibility, deadlines, military and overseas voting and updates to the voting laws in Kentucky, please visit our absentee voting by state page.

Voting early

See also: Early voting

Kentucky is one of 8 states which allow early voting but require an excuse to vote early. Early voting begins 12 work days prior to the election and ends on election day.[7] The average number of days prior to an election that voters can cast an early ballot is 21 days in states with a definitive starting date.

To vote early you need to provide an excuse for why you will be unable to vote at the polls during normal voting hours. The following are valid reasons:[7]

  • You will be out of the county on election day;
  • You are Military, their Dependents, or an Overseas Citizen;
  • You are Military personnel confined to base and learn of your confinement within seven days or less of an election;
  • You are a Student who resides outside the county or a resident who temporarily resides outside of the state, and will not be in the county on Election Day;
  • You are a voter or the spouse of a voter who has surgery scheduled that will require hospitalization on Election Day;
  • You are a pregnant woman in your third trimester.
  • You are a Precinct election officer appointed to serve in precinct other than his own
  • You are a Alternate precinct officer
  • You are a County Board of Elections’ members
  • You are a County Board of Elections’ staff member
  • You are a Deputy county clerk
  • You are a State Board of Elections’ staff member

Elections Performance Index

See also: Pew Charitable Trusts' Elections Performance Index

Kentucky ranked 27th out of the 50 states and District of Columbia in the Pew Charitable Trusts' Elections Performance Index (EPI), based on the 2012 elections. The EPI examines election administration performance and assigns an average percentage score based on 17 indicators of election performance. These indicators were chosen to in order to determine both the convenience and integrity of these three phases of an election: registration, voting and counting. Kentucky received an overall score of 64%.[8]

See also

References