Difference between revisions of "Labor Commissioner"

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==Elected vs. appointed==
 
==Elected vs. appointed==
As it currently stands, there are three ways in which an individual is able to be selected for the office of labor commissioner: statewide elections, gubernatorial appointment, or appointment by the state legislature.
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As it currently stands, individuals are able to be selected for the office of labor commissioner by statewide elections or gubernatorial appointment.
  
 
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<center>{{Labor elected}}</center>

Revision as of 11:52, 17 February 2014

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State Executive Offices
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Elections by Year
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The Labor Commissioner is a state level position in all 50 states. The duties of the position vary from state to state, but their general role is to oversee the administration of state laws relating to labor and the workforce.

Quick facts about Labor Commissioners
  • Appointed by the governor in 46 states.
  • Elected in: Georgia, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Oregon
  • Oregon’s Brad Avakian is currently the only Democratic, publicly elected labor commissioner.
  • Salary range in 2010: $70,000 (West Virginia) to $175,000 (California)


Officeholders

List of Current Labor Commissioners

List of All Current State Labor Commissioners in the United States
Political positionOfficerAssumed officePolitical Party
Texas Workforce Commission
Andres Alcantar
2008
Non-partisan
Vermont Commissioner of Labor
Annie Noonan
2011
Non-partisan
North Dakota Commissioner of Labor
Bonnie Storbakken
Non-partisan
Oregon Commissioner of Labor and Industries
Brad Avakian
2008
Non-partisan
Tennessee Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development
Burns Phillips
2013
Non-partisan
Nebraska Director of Economic Development
Catherine D. Lang
2008
Non-partisan
New Mexico Secretary of Workforce Solutions
Celina Bussey
2011
Non-partisan
Rhode Island Director of Labor
Charles Fogarty
2011
Non-partisan
North Carolina Commissioner of Labor
Cherie K. Berry
2001
Ends.png Republican
California Director of Industrial Relations
Christine Baker
2011
Non-partisan
Virginia Commissioner of Labor and Industry
Courtney Malveaux
2010
Non-partisan
Louisiana Executive Director of the Workforce Commission
Curt Eysink
2009
Non-partisan
Director of Ohio Development Services Agency
David Goodman
2013
Non-partisan
Nevada Director of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation
Dennis Perea
2014
Non-partisan
Alaska Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development
Dianne Blumer
2012
Non-partisan
Hawaii Director of Labor and Industrial Relations
Dwight Takamine
2011
Non-partisan
Colorado Executive Director of Labor and Employment
Ellen Golombek
2011
Non-partisan
New Jersey Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development
Harold Wirths
2010
Non-partisan
South Carolina Director of Labor, Licensing and Regulation
Holly Gillespie Pisarik
2012
Non-partisan
Texas Workforce Commission
Hope Andrade
2013
Non-partisan
New Hampshire Commissioner of Labor
James Craig
2013
Non-partisan
Maine Commissioner of Labor
Jeanne Paquette
2012
Non-partisan
Florida Executive Director of the Department of Economic Opportunity
Jesse Panuccio
2013
Non-partisan
Wyoming Director of Workforce Services
Joan Evans
2007
Non-partisan
Washington Director of Labor and Industries
Joel Sacks
2013
Non-partisan
West Virginia Commissioner of Labor
John Junkins
2013
Non-partisan
Delaware Secretary of Labor
John McMahon
2009
Non-partisan
Illinois Director of Labor
Joseph Costigan
2011
Non-partisan
Pennsylvania Secretary of Labor & Industry
Julia Hearthway
2011
Non-partisan
West Virginia Secretary of Commerce
Keith Burdette
2011
Non-partisan
Idaho Director of Labor
Ken Edmunds
2013
Non-partisan
Minnesota Commissioner of Labor and Industry
Ken Peterson
2011
Non-partisan
Kansas Secretary of Labor
Lana Gordon
2012
Non-partisan
Kentucky Secretary of Labor Cabinet
Larry Roberts
2013
Non-partisan
Director of the Industrial Commission of Arizona
Laura McGrory
2008
Non-partisan
Maryland Secretary of Labor, Licensing and Regulation
Leonard Howie
2012
Non-partisan
South Dakota Secretary of Labor
Marcia Hultman
2003
Non-partisan
Georgia Commissioner of Labor
Mark Butler
2011
Ends.png Republican
Oklahoma Commissioner of Labor
Mark Costello
2011
Ends.png Republican
Mississippi Executive Director of Employment Security
Mark Henry
2012
Non-partisan
Iowa Commissioner of Labor
Michael Mauro
2011
Non-partisan
Montana Commissioner of Labor and Industry
Pam Bucy
2013
Non-partisan
New York Commissioner of Labor
Peter Rivera
2012
Non-partisan
Massachusetts Secretary of Labor and Workforce Development
Rachel Kaprielian
2014
Non-partisan
Wisconsin Secretary of Workforce Development
Reggie Newson
2011
Non-partisan
Indiana Commissioner of Labor
Rick Ruble
2013
Non-partisan
Arkansas Director of Labor
Ricky Belk
2013
Non-partisan
Texas Workforce Commission
Ronald Congleton
2003
Non-partisan
Missouri Director of Labor and Industrial Relations
Ryan McKenna
2013
Non-partisan
Connecticut Commissioner of Labor
Sharon Palmer
2012
Non-partisan
Utah Commissioner of Labor
Sherrie Hayashi
2006
Non-partisan
Michigan Director of Labor and Economic Growth
Steve Arwood
2012
Non-partisan
Nevada Commissioner of Labor
Thoran Towler
2011
Non-partisan
Alabama Commissioner of Labor
Tom Surtees
2012
Non-partisan

Elected vs. appointed

As it currently stands, individuals are able to be selected for the office of labor commissioner by statewide elections or gubernatorial appointment.

NevadaUtahColoradoNew MexicoWyomingArizonaMontanaCaliforniaOregonWashingtonIdahoTexasOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaMinnesotaIowaMissouriArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaGeorgiaFloridaSouth CarolinaIllinoisWisconsinTennesseeNorth CarolinaIndianaOhioKentuckyPennsylvaniaNew JerseyNew YorkVermontVermontNew HampshireMaineWest VirginiaVirginiaMarylandMarylandConnecticutConnecticutDelawareDelawareRhode IslandRhode IslandMassachusettsNew HampshireMichiganMichiganAlaskaHawaiiLabor Commissioners.png

While the vast majority of the states that do have the statewide governmental position authorize the governor to appoint an individual to the office, there are at least five others who have opted to have public voters select the office holders. These states include Arizona, Georgia, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Oregon.

The current party breakdown of State Labor Commissioners based on whether they are elected by the general public or appointed by the governor of an individual state shows that:

  • Of the 4 publicly elected to office, 3 are Republicans while 1 is non-partisan.
  • Governors in the other 46 states are authorized to appoint individuals as Labor Commissioners.

Election history

2014

Main article: State executive official elections, 2014

Two states will hold regularly scheduled labor commissioner elections in the 2014 electoral cycle: Georgia and Oklahoma.

2012

Main article: State executive official elections, 2012

Two states held scheduled labor commissioner elections in the 2012 electoral cycle: North Carolina and Oregon.

Cherie Berry (R) won re-election in North Carolina and Brad Avakian (D) won re-election in Oregon on November 6, 2012.[1][2]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a google news search for the term Labor + Commissioner + State

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Labor Commissioner News Feed

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See also

External links

References