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Laura Santos and Barbara Boyd recall, Bassett Unified Schools (2010)

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An effort to recall Laura Santos and Barbara Boyd from their positions as elected trustees of the Board of Education of Bassett Unified School District in Los Angeles County began in April 2010.[1][2]

The recall effort was ultimately abandoned.

Background

The terms that Santos and Boyd were serving at the time the recall effort was first spoken of were up for re-election in November 2011.

Jose Medina was affiliated with the recall organizers. His wife, Victoria Medina, sits on the Bassett Unified Board of Education with Santos and Boyd. Recall organizers said they objected to a high dropout rate, increased class sizes, teacher layoffs and the board members' approval of the superintendent's salary.[1]

The school district has had to trim $2.5 million from its budget because tax revenues in the area have declined due to the area's ongoing economic depression.

Opposition

The editorial board of the Pasadena Star News came out against the recall, writing, "Blaming two school board members in Bassett Unified for the cuts to personnel and programs is like blaming President Obama for the recession. It's absurd" and "Recalls of elected officials should be a last resort and should be reserved for egregious breaches in personal conduct. This recall petition doesn't pass that test and due to the cost and the disruption to regular board business, could end up hurting the children of Bassett Unified."[3]

New superintendent

Martin Galindo was selected as the school district's new superintendent in July 2010, on a 5-0 school board vote. Galindo replaced Jim Ballard. Ballard retired and gave as his reason for retiring that dynamics on the board were making it increasingly difficult for him to fulfill his goals for the district.[2]

Path to the ballot

Recall organizers need to collect signatures on recall petitions equaling 20% of the district's registered voters in order to force a recall vote. Signatures were never submitted, and the recall effort came to an end.

See also

References