Difference between revisions of "Laws governing local ballot measures in Arizona"

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{{Local ballot law vnt}}{{tnr}}{{AZConstitution}}
State law establishes that all local governments in Arizona have [[Initiative|initiative]] and [[Referendum|referendum]] powers regarding local ballot measures.  
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State law establishes that all local governments in Arizona have [[Ballot initiative|initiative]] and [[Referendum|referendum]] powers regarding local ballot measures.  
  
 
This article sets out the '''laws governing <u>local</u> ballot measures in Arizona'''. It explains:
 
This article sets out the '''laws governing <u>local</u> ballot measures in Arizona'''. It explains:

Revision as of 09:27, 25 February 2014


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Laws Governing Local Ballot Measures

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Terms
InitiativeHome ruleGeneral law cityCharter cityPetitionCirculation periodCirculatorPaid circulatorVolunteer circulatorCirculator affidavitSignerValid signatureForged signatureFraudulent signatureInvalid signatureElectronic petition signatureLegislative tamperingRegistered voter
Arizona Constitution
Flag of Arizona.png
Preamble
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State law establishes that all local governments in Arizona have initiative and referendum powers regarding local ballot measures.

This article sets out the laws governing local ballot measures in Arizona. It explains:

  • Which local units of government make the initiative process available to residents.
  • How and whether local units of government, including school districts, can refer local ballot measures (such as school bond propositions) to the ballot.
  • An overview of laws governing local recall elections.

Types of local government

Local government in Arizona consists of:

  • Counties: Arizona counties have a sheriff, county attorney, county recorder, treasurer, assessor, superintendent of schools, and three or five supervisors, each elected to a four-year term.[1]
  • Cities: any incorporated community with a population of over 3,000 can be a city.[1] The oldest city is Tucson, which was incorporated by the State Territorial Legislature in 1877.[2] Arizona cities are either Charter cities or General law cities. Under Article XIII, Section 2.2 of the Arizona State Constitution any city with a population of over 3,500 can become a Charter city.
  • Towns: an incorporated community with a population of under 3,000 is a town. After the population of a town has increase beyond 3,000 it may become a city although many towns do not.[3] Towns are similar to cities but have fewer powers.[4]

Units of government:

15 counties
44 cities
47 towns
19 of the cities are chartered.[5]
  • In addition, there are 309 special districts and 244 independent school districts.[6]

School districts

See also: School bond and tax elections in Arizona

Arizona has a law that allows the voters of a school district to override a budget if the budget exceeds the operating limit. In the event that an Arizona school district fails to gain voter approval on a budget override election, a substitute, no tax increase budget must be made. [7] Arizona allows for school districts to override their budgets by five percent for each fiscal year within the budgeted expenditures of a special program.[8] The five percent revenue limit is used if it involves the constitutionally protected debt limit in the Arizona Constitution.[9]

Local recall

Laws governing recall in Arizona are defined in Article 8 of the Arizona Constitution.

The authority to conduct a recall election in Arizona applies to "Every public officer in the state of Arizona, holding an elective office, either by election or appointment."

A recall can be filed against any public officer on any grounds.

The recall may not be filed until after the elected official has been in office in his or her first term for at least six months. This six-month limit does not apply to state legislators. In the case of state legislators, a recall petition may commence five days after the start of their first legislative session after their election. In the case of other elected officials, there is no six-month limit for subsequent terms in office.[10]

A recall petition must be filed at the office in which the officer being recalled files for nomination and must contain a general statement explaining the recall, not exceeding 200 words. This petition must be signed by the sponsors who swear an oath that all signatures collected will be valid signatures. The signature requirement is 25 percent of the number of votes cast in the last election for that office.

For additional detail see: Laws governing recall in Arizona

Initiative process availability

Ballot Law Portal
Laws Governing Ballot Measures

The initiative and referendum powers for both ordinances and charter amendments are mandated and the procedures are partially set for all counties, cities, and towns by State Law.[5]

Authority

A guide to local ballot initiatives
Local Ballot Initiatives cover.jpg

Constitution

The Arizona Constitution provides that every incorporated city, town and county has initiative and referendum rights and sets the signature requirements. It provides that municipal charters can be amended via this initiative process.

Article XIII, section 2 establishes procedures for amending municipal charters:

Statutes

Arizona State Code establishes initiative petition and charter amendment:

Initiative process features

Local I&R Laws in the 50 States
Laws governing local ballot measures in WashingtonLaws governing local ballot measures in OregonLaws governing local ballot measures in CaliforniaLaws governing local ballot measures in NevadaLaws governing local ballot measures in ArizonaLaws governing local ballot measures in AlaskaLaws governing local ballot measures in HawaiiLaws governing local ballot measures in UtahLaws governing local ballot measures in IdahoLaws governing local ballot measures in MontanaLaws governing local ballot measures in WyomingLaws governing local ballot measures in ColoradoLaws governing local ballot measures in New MexicoLaws governing local ballot measures in TexasLaws governing local ballot measures in OklahomaLaws governing local ballot measures in KansasLaws governing local ballot measures in NebraskaLaws governing local ballot measures in South DakotaLaws governing local ballot measures in North DakotaLaws governing local ballot measures in MinnesotaLaws governing local ballot measures in IowaLaws governing local ballot measures in MissouriLaws governing local ballot measures in ArkansasLaws governing local ballot measures in LouisianaLaws governing local ballot measures in MississippiLaws governing local ballot measures in TennesseeLaws governing local ballot measures in AlabamaLaws governing local ballot measures in FloridaLaws governing local ballot measures in GeorgiaLaws governing local ballot measures in South CarolinaLaws governing local ballot measures in North CarolinaLaws governing local ballot measures in KentuckyLaws governing local ballot measures in VirginiaLaws governing local ballot measures in West VirginiaLaws governing local ballot measures in WisconsinLaws governing local ballot measures in IllinoisLaws governing local ballot measures in IndianaLaws governing local ballot measures in MichiganLaws governing local ballot measures in MichiganLaws governing local ballot measures in OhioLaws governing local ballot measures in PennsylvaniaLaws governing local ballot measures in MarylandLaws governing local ballot measures in MarylandLaws governing local ballot measures in DelawareLaws governing local ballot measures in DelawareLaws governing local ballot measures in ConnecticutLaws governing local ballot measures in New JerseyLaws governing local ballot measures in New JerseyLaws governing local ballot measures in New YorkLaws governing local ballot measures in ConnecticutLaws governing local ballot measures in MassachusettsLaws governing local ballot measures in Rhode IslandLaws governing local ballot measures in MassachusettsLaws governing local ballot measures in VermontLaws governing local ballot measures in New HampshireLaws governing local ballot measures in MaineLaws governing local ballot measures in New HampshireLaws governing local ballot measures in VermontLocal I&R 50 states Map.png
Source:Local Ballot Initiatives: How citizens change laws with
clipboards, conversations, and campaigns

Initiative process in the top 10 most populated cities

List of Most Populated Cities in Arizona
City[12] Population City Type Next election
Phoenix 1,469,471 Charter N/A
Tucson 525,796 Charter N/A
Mesa 446,518 Charter N/A
Chandler 240,101 Charter N/A
Glendale 230,482 Charter N/A
Scottsdale 221,020 Charter N/A
Gilbert 211,951 General law N/A
Tempe 164,268 Charter N/A
Peoria 156,637 Charter N/A
Surprise 119,849 General law N/A

External links

References