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Difference between revisions of "Legislative tampering"

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{{tnr}}'''Legislative tampering''' is a term used by the [[Initiative & Referendum Institute]] to refer to whether or not a [[state legislature]] is allowed to repeal or amend a [[ballot initiative]] approved by the citizens of the state in an election.
 
{{tnr}}'''Legislative tampering''' is a term used by the [[Initiative & Referendum Institute]] to refer to whether or not a [[state legislature]] is allowed to repeal or amend a [[ballot initiative]] approved by the citizens of the state in an election.
  
Most of the [[states with initiative or referendum]] do allow some degree of legislative tampering. The differences between states have to do with:
+
Most of the [[states with initiative or referendum]] do allow some degree of legislative tampering. Some state differences include:
  
* Whether there is a time limit on when a [[state legislature]] can repeal or revise a law enacted through the initiative process.
+
* Time limits on when a [[state legislature]] can repeal or revise a law enacted through the initiative process.
* The types of ballot measures that a legislature is allowed to repeal or revise.
+
* Types of ballot measures that a legislature is allowed to repeal or revise.
  
 
When state legislatures do have the right of legislative tampering, it only applies to {{issfull}}s.  If a state legislature wants to change the result of an election on an {{icafull}}, they have to go through that state's normal procedure for [[amending state constitutions|amending their constitution]].
 
When state legislatures do have the right of legislative tampering, it only applies to {{issfull}}s.  If a state legislature wants to change the result of an election on an {{icafull}}, they have to go through that state's normal procedure for [[amending state constitutions|amending their constitution]].
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==No restrictions==
 
==No restrictions==
  
States with no restrictions at all on legislative tampering include Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota and Utah.
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States with no restrictions at all on legislative tampering include [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Colorado#Legislative_tampering|Colorado]], [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Maine#Legislative_tampering|Maine]], [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Massachusetts#Legislative_tampering|Massachusetts]], [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Missouri#Legislative_tampering|Missouri]], [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Montana#Legislative_tampering|Montana]], [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Nebraska#Legislative_tampering|Nebraska]], [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Ohio#Legislative_tampering|Ohio]], [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Oklahoma#Legislative_tampering|Oklahoma]], [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Oregon#Legislative_tampering|Oregon]], [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_South_Dakota#Legislative_tampering|South Dakota]] and [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Utah#Legislative_tampering|Utah]].
  
 
==Restrictions==
 
==Restrictions==
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* [[Washington Legislative Reapportionment and Redistricting Act, Initiative 199 (1956)]]
 
* [[Washington Legislative Reapportionment and Redistricting Act, Initiative 199 (1956)]]
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 +
==See also==
 +
{{td}}
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*[[Laws governing the initiative process]]
 +
*[[State legislature]]
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Revision as of 12:58, 10 February 2014

Legislative tampering is a term used by the Initiative & Referendum Institute to refer to whether or not a state legislature is allowed to repeal or amend a ballot initiative approved by the citizens of the state in an election.

Most of the states with initiative or referendum do allow some degree of legislative tampering. Some state differences include:

  • Time limits on when a state legislature can repeal or revise a law enacted through the initiative process.
  • Types of ballot measures that a legislature is allowed to repeal or revise.

When state legislatures do have the right of legislative tampering, it only applies to initiated state statutes. If a state legislature wants to change the result of an election on an initiated constitutional amendment, they have to go through that state's normal procedure for amending their constitution.

No restrictions

States with no restrictions at all on legislative tampering include Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota and Utah.

Restrictions

Passage of time

Some states allow the legislature to amend or repeal initiated state statutes, but only after a certain amount of time has elapsed. These states are:

State Years that must elapse
Alaska Can amend immediately; must wait 2 years to repeal
Nevada Must wait 3 years
North Dakota For 7 years, a 2/3rds vote is required to change
Washington For 2 years, a 2/3rds vote is required to change

Laws by state

Alaska

Laws governing the initiative process in Alaska

The Alaska State Legislature may not repeal a measure for two years following its passage. However, lawmakers can amend the initiated law at any time by a simple majority vote.

DocumentIcon.jpg See law: Alaska Constitution, Article XI, Section 6

Arizona

Laws governing the initiative process in Arizona

The Arizona State Legislature may not repeal a successful initiative or referendum. Lawmakers can amend the law, but only if the amendment "furthers the purposes" of the measure and passes with a 3/4 supermajority.

DocumentIcon.jpg See law: Arizona Constitution, Article IV, Part 1, Section 1, ¶ 6

Arkansas

Laws governing the initiative process in Arkansas

The Arkansas State Legislature may not repeal or amend a successful initiative or referendum, except by a two-thirds supermajority vote.

DocumentIcon.jpg See law: Arkansas Constitution, Article 5, Section 1

California

Laws governing the initiative process in California

The California State Legislature may not amend or repeal an approved measure without submitting the change to voters. However, a ballot measure may include a clause waiving this protection.

Once ballot measures are certified for the ballot, they are submitted to the legislature. The legislature has no control over the measure or whether it appears on the ballot. However, California law requires the legislature to hold public hearing on the measures at least 30 days prior to the election.

DocumentIcon.jpg See law: California Constitution, Article II, Section 10 (c) & California Election Code, Sections 9034

Colorado

Laws governing the initiative process in Colorado

The Colorado General Assembly may change or repeal initiated measures. In the case of initiated statutes, this only requires a simple majority. In the case of amendments, the Assembly must pass the amendment by a two-thirds majority and place it on the ballot. (The same process required for ordinary legislatively-referred constitutional amendments.)

DocumentIcon.jpg See law: Colorado Constitution, Article V, Section 1, ¶ 4 & Article XIX, Section 2, ¶ 1

Florida

Laws governing the initiative process in Florida

Since only initiated constitutional amendments are permitted under Florida law, lawmakers must use the ordinary amendment process to overturn successful ballot measures. In order to place an amendment on the ballot, lawmakers in each chamber must pass a resolution with a three-fifths majority vote. The repeal/revision amendment must receive the usual 60% supermajority for passage.

DocumentIcon.jpg See law: Florida Constitution, Article XI, Section 1 & Section 5

Maine

Laws governing the initiative process in Maine

Maine does not limit how soon, or with what majority, the legislature can repeal a measure.[1]

DocumentIcon.jpg See law: Maine Constitution, Article IV, Part 3, Sections 17-22 & Maine Revised Statutes, Title 21-A, Chapter 11

Massachusetts

Laws governing the initiative process in Massachusetts

The Massachusetts State Legislature can both repeal and amend initiatives, according to Massachusetts Constitution Article 48, Gen. Prov. Pt. 6.

Michigan

Laws governing the initiative process in Michigan

The Michigan State Legislature can repeal and amend ballot initiatives by a 75% supermajority vote of each house or as otherwise provided by the initiative.

Mississippi

Laws governing the initiative process in Mississippi

Constitutional amendments by initiative become part of the constitution and are thus only alterable by the legislature through regular constitutional procedures, any changes of which must be approved by popular vote.

Missouri

Laws governing the initiative process in Missouri

The Missouri State Legislature can both repeal and amend initiated state statutes, but not initiated constitutional amendments.

Montana

Laws governing the initiative process in Montana

The Montana State Legislature can both repeal and amend initiated state statutes (but not initiated constitutional amendments, except through the normal procedures for amending the Montana Constitution.)

Nebraska

Laws governing the initiative process in Nebraska

The Nebraska State Legislature can repeal and amend initiated state statute, but not initiated constitutional amendments. The legislature can repeal and amend initiative statutes by a simple majority.

Nevada

Laws governing the initiative process in Nevada

The Nevada State Legislature can only repeal or amend initiated state statutes three years after they have been enacted.

North Dakota

Laws governing the initiative process in North Dakota

The North Dakota State Legislature can repeal or amend an initiated state statute by a 2/3 vote of each house for seven years after passage. Once seven years have elapsed, a simple majority vote in the state legislature is required.

Ohio

Laws governing the initiative process in Ohio

The Ohio State Legislature can both repeal and amend initiated state statutes.

Oklahoma

Laws governing the initiative process in Oklahoma

The Oklahoma State Legislature can both repeal and amend initiated state statutes, according to a court ruling.

Oregon

Laws governing the initiative process in Oregon

The Oregon State Legislature can repeal and amend initiated state statutes by a simple majority vote.

South Dakota

Laws governing the initiative process in South Dakota

The South Dakota State Legislature can both repeal and amend initiated state statutes.

Utah

Laws governing the initiative process in Utah

Initiatives that are approved by the voters are treated as regular statutes and may be amended or repealed by the Utah State Legislature at any legislative session after the act or law has taken effect.

Washington

Laws governing the initiative process in Washington

The Washington State Legislature can repeal or amend an initiative by a two-thirds vote of each house during the first two years of enactment and by majority vote thereafter.

Examples of legislative tampering in Washington include:

See also

Ballotpedia:Index of Terms

References