PGI logo cropped.png
Congressional Millionaire’s Club
The Personal Gain Index shines a light on how members of Congress benefit during their tenure.





Leon Jukowski recall, Pontiac, Michigan (2012)

From Ballotpedia
Revision as of 08:06, 6 May 2014 by JerrickA (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
Recall
RecallBanner.jpg
Historical recalls
Recall news
Recall laws

An effort to recall Leon Jukowski from his position as mayor of Pontiac, Michigan in Oakland County was launched in January 2012.[1] The initial recall effort fell short in April 2012, but a second recall attempt was launched in May 2012.[2] The second recall effort was ultimately abandoned. Jukowski was elected in 2009.

Reasons for recall

Quincy Stewart was the leader of the initial recall effort. Recall supporters alleged that Jukowski had a conflict of interest because, in addition to serving as mayor, he is a paid consultant to Louis Schimmel. Schimmel was appointed as Pontiac's Emergency Manager by Governor Rick Snyder.[3] Gloria Miller headed up the second recall effort. She said her motivations for recall were the same as Stewart's--she was concerned about a conflict of interest stemming from Jukowski's consulting position.

In February, voters decided if the city should open up the charter for revisions. This could pave the way for a return to Pontiac being operated by a city manager.[1]

Path to the ballot

In January 2012, an Oakland County Circuit Court judge approved petition language, giving the go-ahead to petitioners to begin collecting signatures.[1]

Recall supporters had 180 days to collect 3,237 signatures.[3] In early April 2012, recall supporters submitted 3,500 signatures.[4] However, only 3,150 signatures were verified, leaving recall supporters 87 signatures short of the number required to force a recall election.

On May 1, recall supporter Gloria Miller filed petition language against Jukowski, kicking off a second recall attempt. The recall language was approved, meaning signature collection efforts could legally proceed.[2] Signatures were not submitted on the second recall petition, and the recall effort came to an end.

See also

External links

References