Difference between revisions of "Local ballot measure elections in 2014"

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===Pension Hotspots report===
 
===Pension Hotspots report===
Besides having detailed articles on each local measure related to pensions, the local ballot measure project releases a monthly report on pension reform. Below are the 2014 editions:
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Besides having [[Local pensions on the ballot|detailed articles on each local measure related to pensions]], the local ballot measure project releases a monthly report on pension reform. Below are the 2014 editions:
  
 
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Revision as of 13:52, 20 March 2014

2014 Local Ballot Measures
By election date
By state
By topic
LocalBallotMeasures Final.png
Election statsMeasuresTopics
Local election costs
County website evals.

Local pension measures

Pension Hotspots Reports

Original case study on San Jose and San Diego:

Pension reform: San Jose and San Diego voters weigh in
Notable measures
FrackingGMOsMarijuanaMinimum wageSports arenasSecessionOther
School bonds & taxes
Approval rates of School bonds and taxes
Lawsuits
2014 statewide ballot measures
All about Local Measures
CalendarLocal news

In 2014, Ballotpedia is covering all local measures in California as well as any local pension reform efforts on the ballot and any local measures that concern notable or hot button issues.

Coverage of local measures

Pension Hotspots report

Besides having detailed articles on each local measure related to pensions, the local ballot measure project releases a monthly report on pension reform. Below are the 2014 editions:



Notable topics

Ballotpedia is covering the following notable local topics in detail in 2014:

Election details

This page summarizes local issues and keeps track of local election dates as followed on the site.

  • The first tab, Elections, notes each date that an election was held in the year as well as giving a summary of results for elections that have already occurred.
  • The second tab, State, lists each state and lists a few of the measures featured in that state this year.
  • The third tab, Topic lists the most notable topics addressed in various local measures throughout the year.
  • The last tab, News has the most recent news article about local measures as well as listing the last five archived articles.

[edit]

Arizona

See also: Local ballot measures, Arizona
Az county map.png


...click here for all 2014 Arizona local measures.

California

See also: Local ballot measures, California
California-county-map.gif


...click here for all 2014 California local measures.

Colorado

See also: Local ballot measures, Colorado
Map of Colorado counties.png


...click here for all 2014 Colorado local measures.

Florida

See also: Local ballot measures, Florida
Florida counties map.png


...click here for all 2014 Florida local measures.

Illinois

See also: Local ballot measures, Illinois
Local ballot measures, Illinois


...click here for all 2014 Illinois local measures.

Michigan

See also: Local ballot measures, Michigan
Michigan counties map.gif


...click here for all 2014 Michigan local measures.

Missouri

See also: Local ballot measures, Missouri
Link=Local ballot measures, Missouri


...click here for all 2014 Missouri local measures.

Ohio

See also: Local ballot measures, Ohio
Ohio counties map.png


...click here for all 2014 Ohio local measures.

Oregon

See also: Local ballot measures, Oregon
Oregon counties map.png


...click here for all 2014 Oregon local measures.

Washington

See also: Local ballot measures, Washington
Map of State of Washington.png


...click here for all 2014 Washington local measures.

Wisconsin

See also: Local ballot measures, Wisconsin
Wisconsin county map.png


...click here for all 2014 Wisconsin local measures.

Below are the most notable topics addressed on local ballot measures in 2014.

See also: Political topics in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 & Notable local measures on the ballot.

Fracking

see also: Fracking on the ballot



GMOs

See also: Local GMO on the ballot



Marijuana legalization

See also: Local marijuana on the ballot



Marijuana tax

See also: Local marijuana tax on the ballot



Minimum wage

See also: Local wages and pay on the ballot



Pension

See also: Local pensions on the ballot



Development projects

See also: Local zoning, land use and development on the ballot



Miscellaneous

See also: Notable local measures on the ballot




The Tuesday Count: Voters in Arkansas have chance to forbid dry alcohol jurisdictions

Edited by Ryan Byrne

1 certification
145 measures for 2014



Alcohol (News)
Education (Quick hits)
Marijuana (Spotlight)

The 2014 ballot is shaping up to have a number of issues related to state power versus local power. Arkansas is no exception. The state is one of ten that currently allow local governments to determine the legality of alcohol sales, manufacturing and transportation within their jurisdictions. The recently certified Alcoholic Beverage Initiative would disempower local governments from determining the legality of alcohol sales, thus permitting alcohol throughout the state.[1][2]

Meanwhile, California may roll back a 1998 initiative known as Proposition 227. State law, however, doesn't allow legislative tampering without the approval of voters. If Gov. Brown (D) signs the Multilingual Education for a 21st Century Economy Act, it will appear on the 2016 ballot.[3] In Michigan, the legislature approved an indirect initiative that dealt a blow to an already certified measure. Now, Michiganders will vote on two veto referendum, but neither one will affect policy.[4] In Illinois, Bruce Rauner's (R) attempt to get a Term Limits for Legislators Amendment on the ballot has come to a close, with the State Board of Elections issuing the official November ballot without the ballot question.[5]

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, the mayor vetoed a ballot measure that would have allowed voters to decide whether marijuana should be decriminalized within the city. To do so, Mayor Berry (R) had to veto multiple ballot measures, some of which he supported.[6]


California
Arkansas
New Mexico

Arkansans will have the chance to legalize the sale, manufacture, distribution and transportation of alcohol statewide in November. Currently, counties and municipalities have the ability to ban the sale of alcohol within their jurisdictions. As of 2014, 37 counties are dry and 38 are wet or mixed.[7] A mixed county is one where the county is wet, but at least one municipality within the county is dry. Arkansas is one of ten states that currently allow dry counties.[8]

The Arkansas Alcoholic Beverage Initiative, now officially known as Issue 4, was certified for the ballot on August 29, 2014. The measure joins three legislatively-referred constitutional amendments on the ballot. Of the 127,265 signatures submitted to the secretary of state's office, 87,102 of them were deemed valid.[2] Responding to the news, David Couch, chairperson of Let Arkansas Decide, said, "We expect to run a full campaign on the issue."[9] Let Arkansas Decide, the campaign organization sponsoring the amendment, hired about 100 paid petitioners and National Ballot Access to collect signatures.[10][11] Earlier in 2014, Let Local Communities Decide For Themselves, the campaign opposing the amendment, asked the secretary of state's office to stop accepting further petition forms from supporters. They argued that the first batch of signatures should have been filed on July 4, not July 7. Secretary of State Mark Martin (R) defended the signature filing deadline. July 7, after all, was the first business day after July 4, a federal holiday.[12]

The Arkansas Beverage Retailers Association is against Issue 4. The group is partially responsible for the development of the opposition campaign organization Let Local Communities Decide for Themselves. The association is concerned that competition from businesses, especially larger firms like Walmart, will impact current businesses "significantly." David Couch said the association doesn't really care about letting local communities decide, but protecting their members from competition. He said, "The group should disclose who they really are and that their real purpose is that they want to protect their profits."[13]

Public Policy Polling found a slim majority of citizens support the initiated constitutional amendment. The poll showed that most of those in favor of the measure are under the age of 45.[14] A Chism Strategies poll found support to be three points less. While 49 percent support Issue 4, 32 percent oppose the issue. About 20 percent felt neutral or unsure about the measure.[15]

Let Arkansas Decide has already raised $110,000, while Let Local Communities Decide for Themselves has received $1,000.[16][17] Let Local Communities Decide for Themselves, however, has only been around for one month, and Let Arkansas Decide has spent the majority of their contributions on signature gathering. As of August 2014, it's difficult to predict who will have a financial advantage in the next few weeks.


Other local ballot measure news

Ballotpedia News




See also



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