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Difference between revisions of "Louisiana elections, 2013"

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=State House=
 
=State House=
 
:: ''See also: [[Louisiana state legislative special elections, 2013]].''
 
:: ''See also: [[Louisiana state legislative special elections, 2013]].''
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'''State House District 87'''
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:Rep. [[Girod Jackson, III]] (D) resigned on August 22, 2013, after being charged with tax fraud and failing to file taxes. A special election has been called for '''November 16''', with a runoff on '''December 14''' if necessary. Candidates have from October 2 to October 4 to file certified nomination papers.<ref>[http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2013/08/jefferson_parish_girod_jackson.html ''nola.com'', "Jefferson Parish special election to replace ex-Rep. Girod Jackson set Nov. 16," August 30, 2013]</ref>
  
 
'''State House District 65'''
 
'''State House District 65'''

Revision as of 08:39, 12 September 2013

2014
2012


Contents
1 2013 elections
1.1 Special elections
2 Voting in Louisiana
2.1 Important voting information
2.2 Voting absentee
2.3 Voting early
3 Elections Performance Index
4 See also
5 References



Louisiana

Louisiana election information for 2013 is listed below.

On the 2013 ballot
No regularly scheduled elections in Louisiana.
Exceptions include special elections.
Find current election news and links here.
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November 5, 2013
Election Results

2013 elections

The state of Louisiana will hold special elections in 2013.

Special elections

Elections by type

[edit]

See also: Louisiana's 5th congressional district special election, 2013.

U.S. House of Representatives

The 5th congressional district of Louisiana will hold a special election for the U.S. House in 2013. The election will be held October 19, 2013, with a runoff general election to be held November 16, 2013, if required.[1][2]
The special election will be held to fill the upcoming vacancy that will be left by the resignation of Rep. Rodney Alexander (R).[3] Gov. Bobby Jindal announced on August 7, 2013, that Alexander will become the next Secretary of the Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs at the end of September 2013.[3] Alexander's resignation will be effective September 26, 2013.[3]
Jindal announced the date of the election on August 8, 2013.[4] She added that the governor has complete discretion on the timing of a special election as long as the date allows for overseas military ballots to be distributed.[4]

Related: Special elections to the 113th United States Congress (2013-2014).

See also: Louisiana state legislative special elections, 2013.

State House District 87

Rep. Girod Jackson, III (D) resigned on August 22, 2013, after being charged with tax fraud and failing to file taxes. A special election has been called for November 16, with a runoff on December 14 if necessary. Candidates have from October 2 to October 4 to file certified nomination papers.[5]

State House District 65

Clif Richardson (R) announced in November 2012 that he would resign his District 65 seat in the Louisiana House of Representatives effective January 2, 2013. Richardson said he was resigning due to health issues. Speaker of the House Chuck Kleckley (R) called for a special election to be held for the seat on March 2, 2013, with a runoff, if necessary on April 6, 2013. Candidates had until January 11 to file. Barry Ivey (R) defeated Scott Wilson (R) in the special election.[6][7]

State House District 79

Anthony Ligi (R) announced on December 14, 2012 that he would resign his District 79 seat in the Louisiana House of Representatives effective January 1, 2013. Ligi is resigning to become executive director and chief legal counsel for the Jefferson Business Council. Speaker of the House Chuck Kleckley (R) called for a special elected to be held for the seat on March 2, 2013, with a runoff election, if necessary, on April 6, 2013. Candidates had until January 11 to file. Julie Stokes (R) defeated three other Republicans in the special election.[8][9]
Related: See election results here.

Voting in Louisiana

See also: Voting in Louisiana
Voting Absentee Early Map.jpg

Important voting information

  • Louisiana uses a blanket primary system, meaning that all candidates compete in the same primary election, regardless of party affiliation. The two who receive the most votes then advance to the general election. This also means the primary is an open primary, meaning that citizens do not need to register for a specific party to vote in the primary.
  • Registration must be completed at least 30 days prior to election day.
  • As of April 2014, Louisiana is one of the 15 states that have implemented online voter registration. Residents can register online at this website

Voting absentee

See also: Absentee voting by state

For information about eligibility, deadlines, military and overseas voting and updates to the voting laws in Louisiana, please visit our absentee voting by state page.

Voting early

See also: Early voting

Louisiana is one of 34 states that has early voting with no specific requirements as to who can vote early. Early voting begins 14 days before an election and ends seven days prior to election day.[10] The average number of days prior to an election that voters can cast an early ballot is 21 days in states with a definitive starting date.

Elections Performance Index

See also: Pew Charitable Trusts' Elections Performance Index

Louisiana ranked 10th out of the 50 states and District of Columbia in the Pew Charitable Trusts' Elections Performance Index (EPI), based on the 2010 elections. The EPI examines election administration performance and assigns an average percentage score based on 17 indicators of election performance. These indicators were chosen to in order to determine both the convenience and integrity of these three phases of an election: registration, voting and counting. Louisiana received an overall score of 70%.[11]

See also

References