SLP Badge Transparent.png
Read the
State Legislative Tracker
New edition available now!




Mackinac Center for Public Policy

From Ballotpedia
Revision as of 08:08, 9 June 2011 by BaileyL (Talk | contribs)

Jump to: navigation, search

The Mackinac Center for Public Policy is a nonprofit free-market research and educational organization located in Midland, Michigan. Writer and speaker Lawrence Reed has served as president since 1987.

It describes itself as "a nonpartisan research and educational institute devoted to improving the quality of life for all Michigan citizens by promoting sound solutions to state and local policy questions." The New York Times and other newspapers describe the Center as "a conservative think tank."[1] The Raleigh News and Observer has reported that the Center is the largest state-wide conservative think tank in the country.[2]

While the Mackinac Center does not disclose its financial backers, it receives money from a variety of individual donors, corporations, and foundations. The Earhart Foundation is the single largest foundation that gives to the Center. Some of this funding is specifically earmarked to provide money for the Center's divisions which focus on education and labor. [3] The Walton Family Foundation and the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation have also contributed to the Center.[4] The Center also receives money from other foundations that is also earmarked for special uses, such as supporting the Labor and Education Resource Center or its Public Policy Science, Environment and Technology Initiative.[5]

In practice, the Center is libertarian in ideology, and the Center advocates against governmental regulation and many taxes, including the Single Business Tax. Though the Center is non-partisan, it frequently agrees with (or is agreed with by) conservatives, much the same way the Michigan Prospect does with liberals. The Michigan Prospect and the Mackinac Center are frequent opponents on most issues.

The Mackinac Center is a 501(c)(3) organization, legally limited in the amount of money it can spend on legislative efforts.[6]

Notes

External links

This article was taken from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia