Difference between revisions of "Maine gubernatorial election, 2010"

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In the '''Maine gubernatorial election of 2010''', held on [[November 2, 2010 election results|November 2, 2010]], [[Republican]] [[Paul LePage|Paul R. LePage]] defeated [[Democrat]] [[Elizabeth Mitchell|Libby Mitchell]] and Independent [[Eliot R. Cutler]].  Incumbent [[Democratic]] [[Governor of Maine|Governor]] [[John Baldacci]], was [[limited-out|term-limited]].
 
In the '''Maine gubernatorial election of 2010''', held on [[November 2, 2010 election results|November 2, 2010]], [[Republican]] [[Paul LePage|Paul R. LePage]] defeated [[Democrat]] [[Elizabeth Mitchell|Libby Mitchell]] and Independent [[Eliot R. Cutler]].  Incumbent [[Democratic]] [[Governor of Maine|Governor]] [[John Baldacci]], was [[limited-out|term-limited]].
  
In the June 8, 2010  primary elections, State Senator [[Elizabeth Mitchell|Elizabeth H. “Libby” Mitchell]] and Waterville mayor [[Paul LePage|Paul R. LePage]] each faced significant opposition.  They both won their party's nominations with under 40% of the vote.
+
In the June 8, 2010  primary elections, State Senator [[Elizabeth Mitchell|Elizabeth H. “Libby” Mitchell]] and Waterville mayor [[Paul LePage|Paul R. LePage]] each faced significant opposition.  They both won their party's nominations with under 40 percent of the vote.
  
Maine was also one of the states that had a serious third party candidate for governor in 2010.  Elliot R. Cutler, an attorney, actually placed second in the general election, leaving Libby Mitchell in third.
+
Maine was also one of the states that had a serious third party candidate for governor in 2010.  Eliot R. Cutler, an attorney, actually placed second in the general election, leaving Libby Mitchell in third.
  
 
==November 2, 2010 general election results==
 
==November 2, 2010 general election results==
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|Inc1 =  
 
|Inc1 =  
 
|candidate2 = Elizabeth Mitchell
 
|candidate2 = Elizabeth Mitchell
|candidate3 = Eloit R. Cutler
+
|candidate3 = Eliot R. Cutler
 
|candidate4 = Shawn H. Moody
 
|candidate4 = Shawn H. Moody
 
|candidate5 = Kevin L. Scott
 
|candidate5 = Kevin L. Scott

Revision as of 11:09, 12 July 2013

Governors
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Breaking news

In the Maine gubernatorial election of 2010, held on November 2, 2010, Republican Paul R. LePage defeated Democrat Libby Mitchell and Independent Eliot R. Cutler. Incumbent Democratic Governor John Baldacci, was term-limited.

In the June 8, 2010 primary elections, State Senator Elizabeth H. “Libby” Mitchell and Waterville mayor Paul R. LePage each faced significant opposition. They both won their party's nominations with under 40 percent of the vote.

Maine was also one of the states that had a serious third party candidate for governor in 2010. Eliot R. Cutler, an attorney, actually placed second in the general election, leaving Libby Mitchell in third.

November 2, 2010 general election results

Maine Revised Statutes call for the certification, "[w]ithin a reasonable time after an election" (see §724).[1]

Results are now certified.[2]

Governor of Maine, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPaul LePage 37.6% 218,065
     Democratic Elizabeth Mitchell 18.8% 109,387
     Independent Eliot R. Cutler 35.9% 208,270
     Independent Shawn H. Moody 5% 28,756
     Independent Kevin L. Scott 1% 5,664
     Others Various 0.5% 2,624
     Blanks - 1.3% 7,772
Total Votes 580,538
Election Results Via: Maine Secretary of State

Inauguration and transition

Inaugural date

Governor-elect Paul LePage was sworn in on Janaury 5, 2011. However, he had to have a budget ready for the state legislature earlier, when they sat.

The Maine legislature convened on December 1, 2010. Senator Kevin Raye became the Senate President. The assembly will also named the treasurer, auditor, attorney general and secretary of state for Maine - four Constitutional offices that are appointed rather than elected in the state.

The Attorney General was particularly significant as Maine lacks an office of the lieutenant governor and it the state's AG who acts as an ex officio lt. governor.

Transition team

Governor-elect Paul LePage launched his transition site at LePage Transition. In a November 5, 2010 press conference in Augusta, John Morris, Chief of Staff to the LePage campaign, was announced as the transition head.[3] LePage additionally named three transition co-chairs:

  • Tarren Bragdon, CEO of The Maine Heritage Policy Center, advised on budgetary policy.
  • Ann Robinson, partner at Preti Flaherty and former counsel to the Maine Republican Party, advised on regulatory affairs with a focus on spurring job creation in Maine.
  • John Butera, Executive Director of Central Maine Growth Council, advised on economic growth and small business affairs.

The transition team maintained offices at:

LePage Transition 2010
185 Main Street
Waterville, ME 04903
(207) 877-7616

More recently, Governor-elect LePage announced a bipartisan Budget Working Group that will prepare and advise on the budget for the 2011-2013 biennium.[4]

Former Commissioner of the Department of Administrative and Financial Services Sawin Miller headed the team principally assisted by transition co-chair Tarren Bragdon.

Also on the team were:

  • Mary Mayhew, Vice President of the Maine Hospital Association
  • George Kerr, four term former member of the Maine House of Representatives
  • Ryan Low, CFO of the University of Maine, Framingham
  • Mike Tyler, former President of Sandy River Health System

Appointments in the LePage Administration

Deputy Chief of Staff and Policy Director to the gubernatorial campaign, John McGough, was named Chief of Staff to Governor LePage.

Brent Littlefield was the Governor's Senior Political Adviser. During the campaign, Littlefield served as the "strategic consultant for messaging, planning and media".[5]

June 8, 2010 primary

Offical canvasses and results are available through Maine's Secretary of State.[6]

2010 Race for Governor - Democrat Primary [7]
Candidates Percentage
Green check mark.jpg Elizabeth H. 'Libby' Mitchell (D) 37.3%
Glen Steven Rowe (D) 23.2%
Rosa Scarcelli (D) 22.0%
Patrick K. McGowan (D) 20.2%
Total votes 120,176
2010 Race for Governor - Republican Primary [8]
Candidates Percentage
Green check mark.jpgPaul LePage (R) 37.9%
Leslie B. Otten (R) 17.3%
S. Peter Mills (R) 14.4%
Steven W. Abbott (R) 12.8%
Bill Beardsley (R) 9.7%
Bruce Poliquin (R) 5.0%
Matthew C. Jacobson (R) 3.0%
Total votes 131,060

Race ratings

See also: Gubernatorial elections 2010, Race tracking

2010 Race Rankings Maine
Race Tracker Race Rating
The Cook Political Report[9] Toss-up
Congressional Quarterly Politics[10] Leans Democratic
Larry J. Sabato's Crystal Ball[11] Lean Republican
Rasmussen Reports Gubernatorial Scorecard[12] Solid GOP
The Rothenberg Political Report[13] Toss-up Tilting Republican
Overall Call Republican

Changes

5. Larry J. Sabato moved race from "Toss-up" to "Lean Republican" on October 28th.

4. Rasmussen moved race from "Toss-up" to "Solid GOP" on October 28th.

3. Rasmussen moved race from "Leans GOP" to Toss-up" following October 11 polling.

2. Rothenberg moved races from 'Pure Toss-up" to "Toss-up Tilting Republican" in October 1s ratings.

1. Cook Political Report moved race from "Lean Democrat" to "Toss-up" in September 30th ratings.

Polling

Public Policy Polling

2010 Race for Maine Governor - Public Policy Polling
Date Reported LePage (R) Mitchell (D) Cutler (I) Other Don't Know
September 2-6, 2010[14] 43% 29% 11% 6% 12%
(Sample)[15] n=1,468 MoE=+/- 2.6% p=0.05

Rasmussen Reports

2010 Race for Maine Governor - Rasmussen Reports
Date Reported LePage (R) Mitchell (D) Cutler (I) Other Don't Know
October 12, 2010[16] 35% 32% 21% 6% 6%
September 20, 2010[17] 45% 27% 14% 4% 10%
August 12, 2010[18] 38% 30% 16% 4% 11%
July 14, 2010[19] 39% 31% 15% 3% 12%
June 10, 2010[20] 43% 36% 7% 4% 11%
(Sample)[21] n=500 MoE=+/- 4.5% p=0.05

Candidates

The November Ballot – Who Made It? Maine Governor[22]
Nominee Affiliation
Elizabeth Libby Mitchell Democrat
Paul R. LePage Republican
Eliot R. Cutler Independent
Shawn H. Moody Independent
Kevin L. Scott Independent
Edwin S. Braley (write-in, Independent)
Beverly Cooper-Pete (write-in, Independent)
Donna J. Dion (write-in, Democratic)
J. Martin "Marty" Vachon (write-in, unenrolled)
This lists candidates who won their state's primary or convention, or who were unopposed, and who were officially certified for the November ballot by their state's election authority.

Democratic

  • Patrick K. 'Pat' McGowan, previously Commissioner of the Department of Conservation, a state Representative, and the Small Business Administrator under the Clinton Administration
  • State Senator Elizabeth H. 'Libby' Mitchell has spent her life in Maine politics, having served as both President of the Senate and Speaker of the House.
  • Attorney John G. Richardson, one-time Speaker of the House for Maine, withdrew from the race when he failed to qualify to receive public campaign funding. However, his name remained on the primary ballot.
  • Former Attorney General Glen Steven 'Steve' Rowe
  • Rosa W. Scarcelli, a business owner involved in managing affordable housing communities around Maine

Independent

  • Sam Bailey
  • Lawyer and business owner Eliot R. Cutler has spent much of his political life working in land and resource issues.
  • Augustus Edgerton
  • Alex Hammer failed to gather enough signatures to qualify and briefly considered either appealing the decision or running as a write in candidate.
  • Shawn H. Moody founded and runs several auto repair businesses
  • Kevin L. Scott founded a recruiting and placing firm for engineering professionals.
  • John Whitcomb, Selectman and Assessor for the city of Sidney

Republican

  • Attorney Steven W. Abbott has most recently served as Chief of Staff to U.S. Senator Susan Collins.
  • Businessman Bill Beardsley has, for the past 22 years, been President and CEO of Bangor's Husson University
  • Naval Academy graduate and executive Matthew C. Jacobson runs a company dedicated to attracting businesses to Maine.
  • Waterville Mayor Paul LePage faced Democrat Libby Hill in November
  • 4-term State Senator S. Peter Mills is a Naval veteran and an attorney who currently manages a business in the same Maine town where he resides.
  • Leslie B. 'Les' Otten
  • Bruce Poliquin runs an asset management firm he founded and is on the board of numerous non-profit organizations.

Unenrolled

  • Albert Daniel
  • J. Martin Vachon is an unenrolled candidate but affiliatedith the Republican party on his campaign site. His candidacy heavily focused on reforming and improving social services.

Write-in

  • Beverly Cooper Pete, an educator and business owner, filed to run as a write-in candidate on July 15th; previously she had been an Independent candidate.
  • Financial Professional Donna J. Dion, a Democrat, is seeking election as a write-in candidate after failing to make the ballot.

Campaign finance

The Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions makes PDFs of all reports and addenda for candidates available free and online at their "[Campaign Finance Reports, Schedule & Forms Commission on Governmental Ethics and Election Practices]" site.

Candidates for 2010 are most easily searchable using the "View Candidate Lists and Reports Portal"

Additionally, information on campaign fiance disclosures is broken down into several useful metrics on "Follow the Money."

Paul LePage

  • Accepted MCEA funding? NO
Paul LePage Campaign Finance Reports
Report Date Filed Date Amended Beginning Balance Cash Contributions Loans Non-Monetary Contributions (Total Expenditures) Outstanding Debts and Obligations Cash on Hand
42-DAY PRE-GENERAL[23] September 21, 2010 September 21, 2010 $58,926.17 $399,388.30 $0.00 $7,086.86 $(123,339.68) $11,239.59 $533,965.89
42-Day Post-Primary[24] July 20, 2010 August 5, 2010 $146,495.36 $192,262.00 $70,000.00 $648.65 $(149,831.19) $1,500.00 $258,926.17
11-Day Pre-Primary[25] May 27, 2010 July 14, 2010 $188,650.11 $58,634.00 $0.00 $1,632.00 $(100,788.75) $0.00 $146,495.36
42-Day Pre-Primary[26] April 27, 2010 May 19, 2001 $54,504.96 $67,425.25 $91,000.00 $2,999.00 $(24,280.10) $2,498.32 $188,650.11
January 2010 Pre-Election Semi-Annual[27] January 19, 2010 April 6, 2010 $0.00 $38,677.00 $20,000.00 $25.00 $(4,172.04) $4,636.82 $54,504.96
Totals $756,561.55 $181,000.00 $12,391.51 $(307,411.76) $11,239.59

Elizabeth "Libby" Mitchell

  • Accepted MCEA funding? YES
Elizabeth "Libby" Mitchell Campaign Finance Reports
Report Date Filed Date Amended Beginning Balance Seed Money Contributions/MCEA Payments* Other Cash Receipts (Interest, etc.) (Total Expenditures) Outstanding Debts and Obligations Cash on Hand
42-DAY PRE-GENERAL[28] September 21, 2010 September 21, 2010 $627,136.24 $222,695.84 $2,147.76 $(269,455.64) $5,000.00 $583,380.40
42-Day Post-Primary[29] July 20, 2010 September 24, 2010 $148,529.58 $889,753.25 $0.00 $(411,146.59) $0.00 $627,136.24
11-Day Pre-Primary[30] May 2, 62010 September 24, 2010 $375,657.76 $0.00 $0.00 $(227,128.18) $1,206.20 $148,529.58
42-Day Pre-Primary[31] April 27, 2010 September 24, 2010 $199.71 $399,999.91 $0.00 $(24,541.86) $35,934.14 $375,657.76
January 2010 Seed Monday[32] April 6, 2010 September 24, 2001 $39,036.40 $44,279.65 $0.00 $(83,116.34) $856.20 $199.71
January 2010 Pre-Election Semi-Annual[33] January 19, 2010 September 24, 2010 $0.00 $69,573.98 $0.00 $(30,537.58) $508.82 $39,036.40
Totals $1,112,449.09 / $513,853.54* $2,147.76 $(1,045,925.95) -
  • Seed money contributions gathered by a candidate and MCEA authorized payments are subtotaled separately.

Maine Clean Election Act

MCEA is a citizen advanced piece of legislation that passed in 1996, establishing a voluntary system of full public financing for candidates for the state legislature and for governor.[34]

Under MCEA,candidates may collect 'seed money'[35] in the early stages of seeking elected office. Such money is collected by the candidate but is payable to MCEA. These initial funds can only come from individuals, must be at least $5 but not more than $100, and cannot, in toto, exceed statutorily set amounts. For a gubernatorial candidate, the total allowed seed money is $200,000. Donations from lobbyists, clients, and family members of candidates are also heavily limited.

The idea of MCEA is to demonstrate wide spread community support for a campaign. Once a candidate generates the required minimum number[36] of seed money donations, he will begin to receive public funding. At this point, he may no longer accept any private donations. For gubernatorial candidates, the minimum requirement in seed donations is 3,250 unique contributions. All donations of seed money must be collected within a six month period prior to the primary elections; for candidates running in 2010, the qualifying period was October 1, 2009 through April 1, 2010.

During the 2008 cycle 81% of candidates for the state legislature opted for the MCEA system. The system is more popular with Democrats than with Republicans or unenrolled candidates and has grown successively more widely used since its inception. Compared to 2008, when eight out of ten hopefuls used MCEA, 2000 - the first year the system was used - saw a low 33% participation rate.

Maine has held two gubernatorial elections under MCEA; in 2002, the state paid approximately $1.2 million to gubernatorial candidates, a number that rose to just over $3.5 million in 2006. Candidate participation in gubernatorial races was 25% in 2002, rising to 60% in 2006. Two-term Democratic Governor John Baldacci chose to privately fund both of his gubernatorial bids.[37]

In 2010, Democratic primary candidate John G. Richardson pursued MCEA qualification and turned in 3,500 seed money donations. The Maine Ethics Commission, however, notified him they were rejecting all seed money donations collected by three particular circulators, who had not observed MCEA law when gathering donations. The loss of three circulators' contribution left Mr. Richardson's campaign 80 donations short to meet the 3,250 minimum. He declined to appeal the Ethics Commission's signature or to pursue a privately funded race and formally withdrew his candidacy on April 26, 2010.[38]

Gubernatorial electoral history

1998 Gubernatorial Results[39]
Candidates Percentage
Connolly (D) 12.0%
Longley (R) 18.9%
Clarke (unenrolled) 3.6%
King (unenrolled) 58.6%
Lamarche (unenrolled) 6.8%
Total votes 421,009
2002 Gubernatorial Results[40]
Candidates Percentage
John E. Baldacci (D) 47.15%
Peter E. Cianchette (R) 41.47%
Jonathan K. Carter (G) 9.28%
John M. Michael (I) 2.11%
Total votes 505,190
2006 Gubernatorial Results[41]
Candidates Percentage
John E. Baldacci (D)' 38.11%
Chandler E. Woodcock (R) 30.21%
Patricia H. Lamarche (G) 9.56%
Barbara Merrill (I) 21.55%
Philip Morris Napier (TER) 0.56%
Total votes 550,865

Presidential electoral history

2000 Presidential Results
Candidates Percentage
George W. Bush (R) 44.0%
Al Gore (D) 49.1%
2004 Presidential Results
Candidates Percentage
George W. Bush (R) 44.6%
John Kerry (D) 53.6%
2008 Presidential Results[42]
Candidates Percentage
John McCain (R) 40.4%
Barack Obama (D) 57.7%


1992 Presidential Results
Candidates Percentage
George H.W. Bush (R) 30.4%
Bill Clinton (D) 38.8%
1996 Presidential Results
Candidates Percentage
Bob Dole (R) 30.8%
Bill Clinton (D) 51.6%

See also

External links

Candidate pages

References

  1. Maine State Legislature, "Maine Revised Statutes, Title 21-A: ELECTIONS", last updated August 10, 2010, accessed November 10, 2010
  2. Maine Bureau of Corporation, Elections & Commissions, "GENERAL AND REFERENDUM ELECTION - NOVEMEBER 2, 2010", accessed December 21, 2010
  3. LePage Transition, "Meet the Transition Team Co-chairs", November 5, 2010
  4. LePage Transition, "Governor-Elect LePage Announces Budget Working Group", November 16, 2010
  5. LePage Transition, "Governor-Elect Paul LePage Announces Transition Leadership", November 5, 2010
  6. Maine will post official canvasses at the end on July, 2010
  7. WCSH6 Voice of the Voter, Maine Primary Results, June 8, 2010
  8. WCSH6 Voice of the Voter, Maine Primary Results, June 8, 2010
  9. The Cook Political, “Governors: Race Ratings”
  10. CQ Politics, “2010 Race Ratings: Governors”
  11. Larry J. Sabato's Crystal Ball', “2010 Governor Ratings”
  12. Rasmussen Reports', “Election 2010: Scorecard Ratings”
  13. Rothenberg Political Report, “Governor Ratings”
  14. Rasmussen Reports, “LePage Up Big for Maine Governor”, September 8, 2010
  15. [More complete methodology and sampling tabs are available at www.RasmussenReports.com]
  16. Rasmussen Reports, “LePage (R) Drops To Near Tie with Mitchell (D)”, October 13, 2010
  17. Rasmussen Reports, “Maine Governor: LePage (R) Pulls Further Ahead of Mitchell (D), Cutler (I)”, September 22, 2010
  18. Rasmussen Reports, “Maine Governor: LePage (R) 38%, Mitchell (D) 30%, Cutler (I) 16%”, August 16, 2010
  19. Rasmussen Reports, “Maine Governor: LePage (R) 39%, Mitchell (D) 31%, Cutler (I) 15%”, July 19, 2010
  20. Rasmussen Reports, “Maine Governor: LePage 43%, Mitchell 36%, Cutler 7%”, June 11, 2010
  21. [More complete methodology and sampling tabs are available at www.RasmussenReports.com]
  22. Maine Secretary of State, “Candidates for the 2010 General (unofficial)”, last certified September 8, 2010
  23. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “42-DAY PRE-GENERAL: SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE (PRIVATELY FINANCED CANDIDATES)”, accessed September 28, 2010
  24. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “42-Day Post-Primary: SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE (PRIVATELY FINANCED CANDIDATES)”, accessed September 28, 2010
  25. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “11-Day Pre-Primary: SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE (PRIVATELY FINANCED CANDIDATES)”, accessed September 28, 2010
  26. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “42-Day Pre-Primary: SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE (PRIVATELY FINANCED CANDIDATES)”, accessed September 28, 2010
  27. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “JAN 2010 PRE-ELECTION SEMIANNUAL: SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE (PRIVATELY FINANCED CANDIDATES)”, accessed September 28, 2010
  28. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “42-DAY PRE-GENERAL: SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE ((MCEA)”, accessed October 4, 2010
  29. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “42-Day Post-Primary: SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE ((MCEA)”, accessed October 4, 2010
  30. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “11-Day Pre-Primary: SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE ((MCEA)”, accessed October 4, 2010
  31. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “42-Day Pre-Primary: SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE ((MCEA)”, accessed October 4, 2010
  32. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “Seed Money (Gov Jan10 filers): SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE ((MCEA)”, accessed October 4, 2010
  33. Maine Secretary of State, Bureau of Corporations, Elections, & Commissions, “JAN 2010 PRE-ELECTION SEMIANNUAL: SCHEDULE F SUMMARY SCHEDULE (MCEA)”, accessed October 4, 2010
  34. Main Ethics Commission, "Maine Clean Elections Act", accessed July 20, 2010
  35. Main Ethics Commission, "Seed Money", accessed July 20, 2010
  36. Maine Ethics Commission, "Qualifying Contributions", accessed July 20, 2010
  37. Main Ethics Commission, "Maine Clean Election Act: Overview of Participation Rates and Payments, 2000 - 2008 ", accessed July 20, 2010
  38. Pine Tree Politics, "John Richardson Officially Withdraws From Race", April 26, 2010
  39. Maine Secretary of State, “General Election Tabulations - November 3, 1998”, certified November 20, 1998
  40. 'Maine Secretary of State, “ General Election Tabulations: November 5, 2002: GOVERNOR ”
  41. 'Maine Secretary of State, “General Election Tabulations: November 7, 2006: Governor by County and Town”
  42. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections', accessed July 28, 2010