Difference between revisions of "Mark Pryor"

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===Ideology and leadership===
 
===Ideology and leadership===
 
:: ''See also: [[GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking]]''
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Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by ''GovTrack'', Pryor is a "[[GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking|centrist Democrat]]".<ref>[http://www.govtrack.us/congress/person.xpd?id=300080 ''Gov Track'' "Mark Pryor," Accessed May 8, 2013]</ref>
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Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by ''GovTrack'', Pryor is a "[[GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking|centrist Democrat]]" as of June 2013.<ref>[http://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/mark_pryor/300080 ''Gov Track'' "Mark Pryor," Accessed June 7, 2013]</ref>
  
 
===National Journal vote ratings===
 
===National Journal vote ratings===

Revision as of 12:20, 7 June 2013

Mark Pryor
Mark Pryor.jpg
U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Incumbent
In office
2003-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 11
PartyDemocratic
PredecessorTimothy Hutchinson (R)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 4, 2008
First electedNovember 5, 2002
Next general November 4, 2014
Campaign $$4,456,340
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Attorney General, State of Arkansas
1999-2003
Arkansas State House of Representatives
1990-1994
Education
Bachelor'sUniversity of Arkansas, 1985
J.D.University of Arkansas, 1988
Personal
BirthdayJanuary 10, 1963
Place of birthFayetteville, AR
ProfessionAttorney
Net worth$40,501
ReligionChristian
Websites
Office website
Mark Pryor (b. January 10, 1963) is a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate from the state of Arkansas. Pryor was first elected to the Senate in 2002.

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Pryor's academic, professional and political career:[1]

Committee assignments

U.S. Senate

2013-2014

Pryor serves on the following committee[2]:

  • Appropriations
    • Subcommittee on Transportation and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Department of Defense
    • Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies
  • Commerce, Science and Transportation
    • Subcommittee on Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety, and Security
    • Subcommittee on Science and Space
    • Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance
    • Subcommittee on Competitiveness, Innovation, and Export Promotion
    • Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet
  • Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs
    • Subcommittee on Emergency Management, Intergovernmental Relations, and the District of Columbia
    • Subcommittee on the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Federal Programs and the Federal Workforce
    • Subcommittee on Financial and Contracting Oversight
    • Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations
  • Rules and Administration
  • Ethics (Select)
  • Small Business and Entrepreneurship

2011-2012

  • Appropriations
    • Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies
  • Commerce, Science and Transportation
    • Subcommittee on Aviation Operations, Safety, and Security
    • Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet
    • Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance, Chair
    • Subcommittee on Science and Space
    • Subcommittee on Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety, and Security
  • Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs
    • Subcommittee on Investigations
    • Subcommittee on Contracting Oversight
    • Subcommittee on Disaster Recovery and Intergovernmental Affairs, Chair
    • Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security
  • Rules and Administration
  • Ethics (Select)
  • Small Business and Entrepreneurship

Issues

Political Positions

Gay Marriage

Sen. Mark Pryor did not support gay marriage and has not changed his position on this issue. Pryor is one of only three remaining Democratic Senators who have not voiced support for same-sex marriage, as of April 2013. Pryor has most recently stated that he is in the "undecided category."[3]

Specific votes

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Pryor voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. The bill was passed in the Senate by a 89/8 vote on January 1, 2013.[4]

2013 Senate Budget Proposal

Nay3.png On March 23, after an all-night debate that ended just before 5 a.m., by a 50 to 49 vote the Democratically controlled Senate approved its first budget in four years.[5] No Republicans voted for the Senate plan, and four Democrats opposed it. All four are from red states and are up for re-election in 2014.[5] Pryor was one of the four Democrats who voted against the budget proposal.

The approved plan is a $3.7 trillion budget for 2014 and would provide a fast track for passage of tax increases, trim spending modestly and leave the government still deeply in the red for the next decade.[5]

The approval of a budget in the Senate began the process of setting up contentious, and potentially fruitless, negotiations with the Republican-controlled House starting in April to reconcile two vastly different plans for dealing with the nation’s economic and budgetary problems.

The House plan brought the government’s taxes and spending into balance by 2023 with cuts to domestic spending even below the levels of automatic across-the-board cuts for federal programs, and it ordered up dramatic and controversial changes to Medicare and the tax code.[5]

The Senate plan differed greatly, and included $100 billion in upfront infrastructure spending to bolster the economy and calls for special fast-track rules to overhaul the tax code and raise $975 billion over 10 years in legislation that could not be filibustered. Even with that tax increase and prescribed spending cuts, the plan approved by the Senate would have left the government with a $566 billion annual deficit in 10 years, and $5.2 trillion in additional debt over that window.[5]

Expanded background checks on gun sales


Response to Mayors Against Illegal Guns ad

Nay3.png On April 17, 2013, the U.S. Senate took a vote on and defeated a measure that would have expanded federal background checks for firearms purchases.[6] The vote was 54-46, with supporters falling six votes short of the required 60-vote threshold.[7] Pryor was one of the 4 Democratic Senators who voted against the amendment.[8] As a result of the vote, Pryor was targeted by Mayors Against Illegal Guns, a group funded by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The group is running ads in Alaska, Arkansas, and North Dakota, three of the states with Democratic senators who voted against the bill on expanded background checks for gun sales.[9]

Pryor released the following video in response to the ads.

Elections

2014

The FiscalTimes compiled a list of the seven most vulnerable Senate seats up for election in 2014. The seven included in the list are: Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Dakota, and West Virginia. Going into the 2014 election, all seven seats are held by Democrats.[10]

According to an April 2013 Politico report, Pryor had already raised $1.9 million and had $3.4 million cash on hand.[11]

Pryor likely faces some competition from Lt. Gov. Mark Darr (R) who appears likely to jump into the race after ruling out a gubernatorial bid.[10] However, some speculation still exists among Republicans that Rep. Tom Cotton will be the Republican challenger instead.[10]

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Pryor is available dating back to 2002. Based on available campaign finance records, Pryor raised a total of $4,456,340 during that time period. This information was last updated on March 25, 2013.[14]

Mark Pryor's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2002 US Senate (Arkansas) Won $4,456,340
Grand Total Raised $4,456,340

2008

Breakdown of the source of Pryor's campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Pryor won re-election to the U.S. Senate in 2008. During that re-election cycle, Pryor's campaign committee raised a total of $5,943,688 and spent $3,799,989.[15]

His top 5 contributors between 2003-2008 were:


Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Pryor is a "centrist Democrat" as of June 2013.[16]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

2012

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of congress voted in the previous year. Pryor ranked 51st in the liberal rankings among U.S. Senators in 2012.[17]

2011

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of congress voted in the previous year. Pryor ranked 52nd in the liberal rankings among U.S. Senators.[18]

Voting with party

2013

Pryor voted with the Democratic Party 75.4% of the time, which ranked 50th among the 52 Senate Democratic members as of June 2013.[19]

Lifetime missed votes

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Pryor missed 18 of 3,251 roll call votes from January 2003 to March 2013. This amounts to 0.6%, which is better than the median of 1.7% among current senators as of March 2013.[20]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Pryor paid his congressional staff a total of $2,530,611 in 2011. He ranks 15th on the list of the lowest paid Democratic Senatorial Staff Salaries and he ranks 44th overall of the lowest paid Senatorial Staff Salaries in 2011. Overall, Arkansas ranks 36th in average salary for senatorial staff. The average U.S. Senate congressional staff was paid $2,529,141.70 in fiscal year 2011.[21]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, Pryor's net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $16,002 and $65,000. That averages to $40,501, which is lower than the average net worth of Democratic Senators in 2011 of $20,795,450. His average net worth increased by 376.48% from 2010.[22]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, Pryor's net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $1,001 and $16,000. That averages to $8,500, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican Senators in 2010 of $7,054,258.[23]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Mark + Pryor + Arkansas + Senate

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

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Personal

Pryor and his wife, Jill, have two children.

External links


References

  1. Biographical Director of the United States Congress "Mark Pryor," Accessed October 20, 2011
  2. Congressional Quarterly "Senate Committee List" Accessed January 18, 2013
  3. On Top, "Sen. Mark Pryor Says He's 'In The Undecided Category' On Gay Marriage," April 6, 2013
  4. U.S. Senate "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 New York Times "Senate Passes $3.7 Trillion Budget, Setting Up Contentious Negotiations" accessed March 25, 2013
  6. NPR, "Senate Rejects Expanded Background Checks For Gun Sales," accessed April 19, 2013
  7. Fox News, "Background check plan defeated in Senate, Obama rips gun bill opponents," accessed April 19, 2013
  8. NPR, "Historically Speaking, No Surprise In Senate Gun Control Vote," accessed April 19, 2013
  9. Politico, " Gun control ads have Democrats worrying," May 7, 2013
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 Fiscal Times " 7 Senate Seats Most at Risk—Hint: They’re All Blue" Accessed February 15, 2013
  11. Politico "Red-state Democrats raise millions" Accessed April 18, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. Open Secrets "Career Fundraising for Mark Pryor," Accessed March 25, 2013
  15. Open Secrets "Mark Pryor 2008 Election Cycle," Accessed October 22 2011
  16. Gov Track "Mark Pryor," Accessed June 7, 2013
  17. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," February 21, 2013
  18. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: Senate," February 23, 2012
  19. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  20. GovTrack, "Mark Pryor," Accessed April 2, 2013
  21. LegiStorm "Dean Heller"
  22. OpenSecrets.org, "Pryor, (D-AK), 2011"
  23. OpenSecrets.org, "Pryor, (D-AK), 2010"
Political offices
Preceded by
Tim Hutchinson
U.S. Senate - Arkansas
2003-Present
Succeeded by
-