Difference between revisions of "Mayoral recalls"

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==The Office of Mayor==
 
==The Office of Mayor==

Revision as of 18:44, 30 June 2013

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The Office of Mayor

Merriam Webster defines a mayor as an official elected or appointed to act as chief executive or nominal head of a city, town or borough. The duties of a mayor vary depending on the government system in place in a city, town or other municipality:

  • council-manager government: In this type of government, the mayor serves as the head of a city council. The mayor and city council decide the legislative matters for the city, while the manager makes executive decisions. Under this system, the mayor and city council serve part-time. The city manager handles the daily management duties of the city.
  • mayor-council government: This type of government can operate under either a strong mayor or weak mayor system. Most larger cities in the United States operate under a strong mayor system. The mayor serves as an elected executive for the city with the city council having the power to decide legislative matters.

With a weak mayor system, the powers of the mayor are mainly ceremonial. The mayor can appoint heads of departments but any actions must be approved by the city council. The city council and the mayor share executive and legislative powers. This type of government is favored primarily among smaller cities.

Placing a mayor recall vote on the ballot

As with most recall efforts, the recall of a mayor often begins when an individual or group decides to take action because they are dissatisfied with a mayor's job performance.

An application or other document must be filed with the appropriate city official to begin a recall effort. The city official determines the number of signatures needed qualify for a recall election. Generally the number of signatures to be obtained corresponds to a certain percentage of the votes cast during the last election for the office of mayor.

Depending on when a recall effort begins, the time frame to obtain the needed signatures varies. Once the required signatures are obtained and submitted, the signatures must be verified. In some municipalities, a certain percentage of signatures must be obtained from individuals who voted in the last election and now want to see the mayor removed from office.

Some cities specify a special election must be held within a short time frame after the signatures supporting a recall vote have been verified. In other municipalities, a recall is placed on the ballot during the next regularly scheduled election.

Recalling a mayor

Mayors are subject to recall elections in 38 states.

In some states, the right of recall extends to all mayors in all municipalities in the state and is guaranteed by either a constitutional provision or a state statute that applies to all the municipalities in the state. Those states are Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Washington and Wisconsin.

In several states, however, the right to hold a recall election for a mayor only applies to certain types of cities. In Texas, the mayor may only be recalled in cities where the city charter specifically authorizes recall. The state of New Mexico, permits the recall of mayors in municipalities with a commission-manager form of government. (See local rules governing local recall.)

In the United States, there are 19,429 municipal governments and 16,504 town or township governments. In some states where there is a township style of municipality, the leader of the township's government is referred to as a supervisor rather than a mayor, but the functions are similar. In total, 35,933 local governments are defined as a municipal government or a town/township government.[1] However, there are only about 1,200 municipalities with a population exceeding 30,000.[2]

Recall elections

Recall elections, especially when they require a special election, can be expensive. Taxpayers foot the bill for the costs of the election. Individuals or groups must pay the costs to bring the recall effort to a vote. A special election held in 2009 to recall the mayor of Akron, Ohio, Don Plusquellic, cost the city $200,000. Plusquellic spent $300,000 to fight the recall effort which ultimately failed.

In response to the rising number of efforts to recall mayors around the country, the United States Conference of Mayors produced a documentary in 2011, ". . .to not only educate our mayors on what is happening in the country and what they need to know about their local recall statutes, but also to help educate the general public about the economic and political costs of recall elections."[3]

Mayoral recalls by year

See also: Comparative analysis of the frequency of mayoral recalls, 2009-2010
[edit]

Mayor was recalled

Mayor resigned or did not run for re-election

Mayor was retained in office

Election scheduled

Recall effort underway, no election scheduled

Court stops recall

Recall effort abandoned

Contents
1 2011
1.1 Mayor was recalled
1.2 Mayor resigned or did not run for re-election
1.3 Mayor was retained in office
1.4 Election scheduled
1.5 Recall effort underway, no election scheduled
1.6 Court stops recall
1.7 Recall effort abandoned
2 2010

Mayor was recalled

Mayor resigned or did not run for re-election

Mayor was retained in office

Court stops recall

Recall effort abandoned

See also: Comparative analysis of the frequency of mayoral recalls, 2009-2010

Alaska

See also: Recall campaigns in Alaska

Portal:Recall Roger Purcell recall, Houston, Alaska (2010)
Defeatedd Doug Isaacson recall, North Pole, Alaska (2010)

Arizona

See also: Recall campaigns in Arizona

Defeatedd David Schwan recall, Carefree, Arizona, 2010

Arkansas

See also: Recall campaigns in Arkansas

Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Carl Redus recall, Pine Bluff, Arkansas

California

See also: Recall campaigns in California

Approveda Dunsmuir: Peter Arth
Approveda Livingston: Daniel Varela
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Hollister: Victor Gomez
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Los Angeles: Antonio Villaraigosa
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Ventura: Bill Fulton
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Soledad: Richard Ortiz
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Ridgecrest: Steven Morgan
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Compton: Eric Perrodin

Colorado

Approveda Dave Walker recall, Palisade, Colorado (2010)
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot John Vazquez recall, Windsor, Colorado, 2010

Florida

See also: Recall campaigns in Florida

Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Carlos Alvarez recall, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2010

Idaho

See also: Recall campaigns in Idaho

Approveda John Miller recall, Salmon, Idaho (2010)
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Kevin Poole recall, Lewiston, Idaho
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Recall of the members of the Kellogg City Council, Idaho (2010)

Kansas

See also: Recall campaigns in Kansas

Defeatedd Don Call recall, McCune, Kansas (2010)
Defeatedd Chris Lette recall, Udall, Kansas (2010)
Defeatedd Bill Goebel recall, Jetmore, Kansas (2010)
Approveda Jimmy Bonds recall, Ogden, Kansas, 2010

Louisiana

See also: Recall campaigns in Louisiana

Approveda Joshua Thomas recall, Wilson, Louisiana, 2010
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Betty Alford-Olive recall, Bastrop, Louisiana, 2010
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Marcia Young, Forest Hill, Louisiana, 2010

Michigan

See also: Recall campaigns in Michigan

Approveda Don Schwieman recall, Flushing Township
Approveda Bob Lepley recall, Marine City
Approveda Fred "Mac" Fortner recall, Davison
Defeatedd Art Moyses recall, LeRoy Township, Michigan, 2010
Defeatedd James Cooper, Grosse Pointe Shores
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Dayne Walling recall, Flint 

Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot John Carmichael recall, Sturgis
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Jeffrey Lamarand, Taylor

New Jersey

See also: Recall campaigns in New Jersey

Defeatedd Anthony Suarez recall, Ridgefield, New Jersey, 2010
Defeatedd Herbert Frederick recall, West Wildwood, New Jersey
Defeatedd Vincent Barella recall, Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey (2010)
Defeatedd Gerard McNamara recall, West Wildwood, New Jersey (2010)
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Silverio Vega recall, West New York, New Jersey (2010)
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Wilda Diaz recall, Perth Amboy, New Jersey (2010)
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Lorenzo Langford recall, Atlantic City, New Jersey (2010)

New Mexico

See also: Recall campaigns in New Mexico

Approveda Jesse James Johnson recall, Raton

Ohio

See also: Recall campaigns in Ohio

Approveda Jane Murray recall, Portsmouth
Approveda Pat Layshock recall, Newton Falls
Approveda Scott Hockenberry recall, West Jefferson
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Ike Stage recall, Grove City
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Tim Humphries recall, Carlisle
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Bruce Akers recall, Pepper Pike
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot David Koontz recall, Norton

Oklahoma

See also: Recall campaigns in Oklahoma

Defeatedd Nathan Bates recall, Stillwater, Oklahoma, 2010
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Dewey Bartlett recall, Tulsa, Oklahoma (2010)

Oregon

See also: Recall campaigns in Oregon

Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Sam Adams recall, Portland, Oregon, 2010

South Dakota

See also: Recall campaigns in South Dakota

Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Dave Schneider recall, Belle Fourche, South Dakota, 2010

Tennessee

See also: Recall campaigns in Tennessee

Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Ron Littlefield recall, Chattanooga, Tennessee (2010)

Texas

See also: Recall campaigns in Texas

Approveda James Stewart recall, Brady, Texas (2010)
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot James Gosey and Dulani Masimini recall, Forest Hill, Texas (2010)

Virginia

See also: Recall campaigns in Virginia

Approveda James Holley recall, Portsmouth, Virginia, 2010

Wisconsin

See also: Recall campaigns in Wisconsin

Defeatedd Kenneth Rottier recall, Seymour, Wisconsin, 2010
Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot Jack Chiovatero recall, New Berlin, Wisconsin (2010)

See also

References