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Difference between revisions of "Melvin Watt"

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====2011-2012====
 
====2011-2012====
Watt served on the following committees:<ref>[http://watt.house.gov/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2577&Itemid=74 ''Congressman Mel Watt, Serving North Carolina's 12th District'' "Committee Assignments"]</ref>
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Watt served on the following committees:<ref>[http://watt.house.gov/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2577&Itemid=74 ''Congressman Mel Watt, Serving North Carolina's 12th District'', "Committee Assignments"]</ref>
 
*[[United States House of Representatives Committee on Judiciary|Judiciary Committee]]
 
*[[United States House of Representatives Committee on Judiciary|Judiciary Committee]]
 
**Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, Competition and the Internet (Ranking Member)
 
**Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, Competition and the Internet (Ranking Member)
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==Personal==
 
==Personal==
Watt is married to Eulada Paysour Watt, an educator.  They have two sons, Brian and Jason, both of whom are graduates of Yale University and have earned graduate degrees.<ref>[http://watt.house.gov/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2576&Itemid=73 ''Congressman Mel Watt, Serving North Carolina's 12th District'' "About Mel"]</ref>
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Watt is married to Eulada Paysour Watt, an educator.  They have two sons, Brian and Jason, both of whom are graduates of Yale University and have earned graduate degrees.<ref>[http://watt.house.gov/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2576&Itemid=73 ''Congressman Mel Watt, Serving North Carolina's 12th District'', "About Mel"]</ref>
  
 
==Recent news==
 
==Recent news==

Revision as of 07:00, 2 May 2014

Melvin L. Watt
Melvin L. Watt.jpg
Director of Federal Housing Finance Agency
In office
December 11, 2013-Present
PartyDemocratic
PredecessorN/A
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
Cost per vote$3.47 in 2012
First electedNovember 3, 1992
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
United States House of Representatives
1993-2013
North Carolina State Senate
1985 - 1987
Education
Bachelor'sUniversity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
J.D.Yale University
Personal
BirthdayAugust 26, 1945
Place of birthSteele Creek, North Carolina
ProfessionAttorney
Net worth$929,020.50
ReligionPresbyterian
Websites
Office website
Melvin Luther "Mel" Watt (b. August 26, 1945, in Steele Creek, North Carolina) is the current Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency. He was nominated to the position by President Barack Obama on May 1, 2013, and was confirmed by the Senate on December 10, 2013, by a vote of 57-41.[1][2]

His nomination was successfully blocked by Senate Republicans in October 2013. It was the first time a sitting member of Congress has had a nomination filibustered since 1843.[3]

Watt was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1992, where he served eleven terms.[4] Prior to his congressional career, Watt was a member of the North Carolina State Senate from 1985 to 1987.[5]

Biography

Watt was born in Steele Creek, North Carolina. He earned his B.A. from the University of North Carolina in 1967 and his J.D. from Yale University in 1970.[5]

Career

After earning his degrees, Watt worked as an attorney in private practice. He was also a member of the North Carolina State Senate from 1985 to 1987.[5]

Confirmation vote

Watt was confirmed as director of the FHFA by the U.S. Senate on December 10, 2013, by a vote of 57-41.[6] Watt's nomination was blocked by Senate Republicans in October 2013.[1]

Mel Watt Confirmation vote, December 10, 2013
Party Votes for Approveda Votes against Defeatedd Total votes
Democratic Party Democrats 53 0 53
Republican Party Republicans 2 41 43
Independent Independents 2 0 2
Total Votes 57 41 98


Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Watt served on the following committees:[7]

2011-2012

Watt served on the following committees:[8]

  • Judiciary Committee
    • Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, Competition and the Internet (Ranking Member)
    • Subcommittee on Courts, Commercial and Administrative Law
  • Financial Services Committee
    • Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit
    • Subcommittee on Insurance, Housing and Community Opportunity

Issues

Legislative actions

113th Congress

CongressLogo.png

The 113th Congress has had 55 out of 5,401 introduced bills enacted into law (1%) as of November 30, 2013. Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 1.14% of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session.[9] For more information pertaining to Watt's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[10]

National security

NDAA

Voted "No" Watt voted against HR 1960 - the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. The bill passed the House on June 14, 2013, with a vote of 315 - 108. Both parties were somewhat divided on the vote.[11]

DHS Appropriations

Voted "No" Watt voted against HR 2217 - the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2014. The bill passed the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 245 - 182 that was largely along party lines.[12]

CISPA (2013)

Voted "No" Watt voted against HR 624 - the CISPA (2013). The bill passed the House on April 18, 2013, with a vote of 288 - 127. The bill would allow federal intelligence agencies to share cybersecurity intelligence and information with private entities and utilities. The bill was largely supported by Republicans, but divided the Democratic Party.[13]

Economy

Government shutdown
See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Voted "No" On September 30, 2013, the House passed a final stopgap spending bill before the shutdown went into effect. The bill included a one-year delay of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate and would have also stripped the bill of federal subsidies for congressional members and staff. It passed through the House with a vote of 228-201.[14] At 1 a.m. on October 1, 2013, one hour after the shutdown officially began, the House voted to move forward with going to a conference. In short order, Sen. Harry Reid rejected the call to conference.[15] Watt voted against the stopgap spending bill that would have delayed the individual mandate.[16]

Voted "Yes" The shutdown finally ended on October 16, 2013, when the House took a vote on HR 2775 after it was approved by the Senate. The bill to reopen the government lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[17] The House passed the legislation shortly after the Senate, by a vote of 285-144, with all 144 votes against the legislation coming from Republican members. Watt voted for HR 2775.[18]

Federal Pay Adjustment Act

Voted "No" Watt voted against HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees. The bill passed the House on February 15, 2013, with a vote of 261 - 154. The bill would prevent a 0.5% pay increase for all federal workers from taking effect, saving the federal government $11 billion over 10 years.[19]

Immigration

Morton Memos Prohibition

Voted "No" Watt voted against House Amendment 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order. The amendment was adopted by the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 224 - 201. The purpose of the amendment as stated on the official text is to "prohibit the use of funds to finalize, implement, administer, or enforce the Morton Memos." These memos would have granted administrative amnesty to certain illegal aliens residing in the United States.[20] The vote largely followed party lines.[21]

Healthcare

Healthcare Reform Rules

Voted "No" Watt voted against House Amendment 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The amendment was adopted by the House on August 2, 2013, with a vote of 227-185. The amendment requires that all changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act be approved by Congress before taking effect. The vote was largely along party lines.[22]

Social issues

Abortion

Voted "No" Watt voted against HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. The resolution passed the House on June 18, 2013, with a vote of 228 - 196 that largely followed party lines. The purpose of the bill is to ban abortions that would take place 20 or more weeks after fertilization.[23]

Previous congressional sessions

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Watt voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was one of 172 Democrats who voted in favor of the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257 - 167 vote on January 1, 2013.[24]

House Judiciary Committee

Congressman Watt was first appointed to the House Judiciary Committee shortly after he was first sworn into Congress in 1993. Watt has served continuously on the committee up to this date.[25] Congressman Watt serves on the House Judiciary Subcommittees on Courts and Competition Policy, the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties Members and on Commercial and Administrative Law.[26][27][28]

Campaign themes

2012

Watt's campaign website listed the following issues:[29]

  • The Economy and Jobs
Excerpt: "Corporate irresponsibility and the loss of our manufacturing base have resulted in an economic meltdown and loss of jobs like we have not seen since the Great Depression. My votes for the stimulus bill and for financial services reform were tough votes that required political courage. But they were necessary votes to get us headed in the right direction again."
  • Healthcare
Excerpt: "The new health care reform law represents a giant step toward providing basic health care to all our citizens, changing the focus from reacting to diseases to preventing them and getting our arms around the rising cost of health care. While the health care reform law is not perfect and must be carefully implemented, I am proud that I supported this historic legislation."
  • Education
Excerpt: "I believe that every citizen has a right to a quality education and I am a strong proponent of funding public education at the highest levels possible. I have consistently supported maximum funding for Head Start, programs authorized under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and federal student aid programs."
  • Homeland Security
Excerpt: "I certainly favor protecting our country against attacks from people or groups plotting to do our citizens harm. But we must not require the American people to sacrifice their right of privacy and trample the principles underlying the individual rights of each citizen in the name of fighting terrorism."
  • Voting Rights
Excerpt: "We should want and encourage more, not fewer, Americans to vote and participate in our democracy. The Voting Rights Act facilitates that goal. By breaking down entrenched barriers to voter access and equity, the Voting Rights Act invites and protects the full and equal participation of all citizens. We must not fear that participation, we must embrace and celebrate it."

Elections

2012

See also: North Carolina's 12th Congressional District elections, 2012

Watt won re-election in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing North Carolina's 12th District. Watt won the nomination on the Democratic ticket after defeating Matt Newton in the Democratic primary on May 8, 2012.[30][31] He then defeated Jack Brosch (R) in the general election on November 6, 2012.

On March 30, 2012, the 12th District was included in a list released by the National Journal of the top ten most contorted congressional districts, as a result of redistricting.[32]

The Washington Post listed the House of Representatives elections in North Carolina in 2012 as 1 of the 10 states that could have determined whether Democrats retook the House or Republicans held their majority in 2013.[33] North Carolina was rated 8th on the list.[33]

U.S. House, North Carolina District 12 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMelvin L. Watt Incumbent 79.6% 247,591
     Republican Jack Brosch 20.4% 63,317
Total Votes 310,908
Source: North Carolina State Board of Elections "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"
U.S. House, North Carolina District 12 Democratic Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngMel Watt 80.9% 52,968
Matt Newton 19.1% 12,495
Total Votes 65,463

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Watt is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Watt raised a total of $3,791,750 during that time period. This information was last updated on May 16, 2013.[44]

Melvin Watt's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 U.S. House (North Carolina, District 12) Won $852,387
2010 U.S. House (North Carolina, District 12) Won $604,719
2008 U.S. House (North Carolina, District 12) Won $680,471
2006 U.S. House (North Carolina, District 12) Won $503,513
2004 U.S. House (North Carolina, District 12) Won $579,199
2002 U.S. House (North Carolina, District 12) Won $260,595
2000 U.S. House (North Carolina, District 12) Won $310,866
Grand Total Raised $3,791,750

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Watt’s reports.[45]

Candidates for Congress are required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Watt’s reports before he announced his resignation.[46]

Melvin Watt (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[47]April 15, 2013$102,690.75$1,000.00$(11,865.91)$91,824.84
July Quarterly[48]July 15, 2013$91,824.84$2,344.55$(14,774.24)$79,395.15
October Quarterly[49]October 12, 2013$79,395.15$10.00$(11,223.08)$68,182.07
Year-End Quarterly[50]December 31, 2013$68,182$5,000$(11,449)$60,932
Running totals
$8,354.55$(49,312.23)

2012

Breakdown of the source of Watt's campaign funds before the 2012 election.

Watt won election to the U.S. House in 2012. During that election cycle, Watt's campaign committee raised a total of $852,387 and spent $857,241.[51]

Cost per vote

Watt spent $3.47 per vote received in 2012.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Watt's campaign funds before the 2010 election.
Watt was re-elected to the U.S. House in 2010 for a tenth term. His campaign committee raised a total of $604,719 and spent $591,204.[52]
U.S. House, North Carolina District 12, 2010 - Melvin Watt Campaign Contributions
Total Raised $604,719
Total Spent $591,204
Total Raised by General Election Opponent $0
Total Spent by General Election Opponent $0
Top contributors to Melvin Watt's campaign committee
Promontory Financial Group$20,300
American Assn for Justice$10,000
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Hospital Authority$10,000
CSX Corp$10,000
Goldman Sachs$10,000
Top 5 industries that contributed to campaign committee
Lawyers/Law Firms$45,646
Securities & Investment$42,400
Commercial Banks$40,000
Insurance$34,750
Misc Finance$31,600

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Watt is a "rank-and-file Democrat" as of June 26, 2013.[53]

Like-minded colleagues

The website OpenCongress tracks the voting records of each member to determine with whom he or she votes most and least often. The results include a member from each party.[54]

Watt most often votes with:

Watt least often votes with:

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Watt missed 253 of 13,539 roll call votes from Jan 1993 to Apr 2013, which is 1.9% of votes during that period. This is better than the median of 2.2% among the lifetime records of representatives currently serving.[55]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Melvin paid his congressional staff a total of $1,027,436 in 2011. Overall, North Carolina ranked 7th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[56]

Net worth

See also: Net worth of United States Senators and Representatives

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Watt's net worth as of 2012 was estimated between $444,041 and $1,414,000. That averages to $929,020.50, which is lower than the average net worth of Democratic representatives in 2012 of $5,700,168.36. Watt ranked as the 217th most wealthy representative in 2012.[57]

Melvin Watt Yearly Net Worth
YearAverage Net Worth
2012$929,020.50
The data used to calculate changes in net worth may include changes resulting from assets gained through marriage, inheritance, changes in family estates and/or trusts, changes in family business ownership and many other variables unrelated to a member's behavior in Congress.

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

2012

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Watt ranked 45th in the liberal rankings among members of the U.S. House.[58]

2011

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Watt ranked 50th in the liberal rankings among members of the U.S. House.[59]

Voting with party

June 2013

Watt voted with the Democratic Party 93.1% of the time, which ranked 81st among the 201 House Democratic members as of June 2013.[60]

Personal

Watt is married to Eulada Paysour Watt, an educator. They have two sons, Brian and Jason, both of whom are graduates of Yale University and have earned graduate degrees.[61]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Melvin + Watt + North Carolina + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Melvin Watt News Feed

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See also

External links


References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Politico, "Mel Watt confirmed as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac regulator," December 10, 2013
  2. Washington Post, "Obama taps telecom lobbyist for FCC, Rep. Watt to head housing finance agency" accessed May 2, 2013
  3. BuzzFeed, "Senate Blocks Nomination Of Sitting Member Of Congress For First Time Since Reconstruction," October 31, 2013
  4. Politico, "2012 Election Map, North Carolina"
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, "WATT, Melvin L., (1945 - )"
  6. GovTrack', "On the Nomination: Melvin L. Watt," December 10, 2013
  7. CQ.com, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress," accessed March 3, 2013
  8. Congressman Mel Watt, Serving North Carolina's 12th District, "Committee Assignments"
  9. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, First Session of the 112th Congress," accessed September 5, 2013
  10. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, Second Session of the 113th Congress," accessed March 4, 2014
  11. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1960 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  12. Project Vote Smart, "HR 2217 - Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  13. Project Vote Smart, "HR 624 - CISPA (2013) - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  14. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  15. Buzzfeed, "Government Shutdown: How We Got Here," accessed October 1, 2013
  16. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  17. The Washington Post, "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013
  18. U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 550," accessed October 31, 2013
  19. Project Vote Smart, "HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  20. The Library of Congress, "H.AMDT.136," accessed September 16, 2013
  21. Project Vote Smart, "H Amdt 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  22. Project Vote Smart, "H Amdt 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  23. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  24. U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff," accessed January 4, 2013
  25. "Black Americans in Congress" Committee Assignments(See Judiciary)
  26. "House Judiciary Committee" 111th Congress Membership, Courts Subcommittee
  27. "House Judiciary Committee" 111th Congress Membership, Constitution Subcommittee
  28. "House Judiciary Committee" 111th Congress Membership, Commercial/Administrative Law Subcommittee
  29. Campaign website, "Issues," accessed September 13, 2013
  30. North Carolina State Board of Elections "2012 Primary Results" Accessed October 10, 2012
  31. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named nc
  32. National Journal, "Modern Gerrymanders: 10 Most Contorted Congressional Districts—MAPS" Accessed March 31, 2012
  33. 33.0 33.1 Washington Post, "The 10 states that will determine control of the House in 2012" Accessed April 25, 2012
  34. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  35. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  36. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  37. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  38. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  39. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  40. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  41. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  42. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  43. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  44. Open Secrets, "Melvin L. Watt" Accessed May 16, 2013
  45. Federal Election Commission, "Melvin L. Watt Summary Report," accessed August 1, 2013
  46. Federal Election Commission, "Melvin L. Watt Summary Report," accessed August 1, 2013
  47. Federal Election Commission, "Melvin L. Watt April Quarterly," accessed August 1st, 2013
  48. Federal Election Commission, "Melvin L. Watt July Quarterly," accessed July 30, 2013
  49. Federal Election Commission, "Melvin Watt October Quarterly," accessed October 22, 2013
  50. Federal Election Commission, "Melvin Watt Year-End Quarterly," accessed February 13, 2014
  51. Open Secrets, "Melvin Watt 2012 Election Cycle," accessed March 4, 2013
  52. Open Secrets, "Melvin L. Watt 2010 Election Data," accessed January 5, 2012
  53. GovTrack, "Watt" Accessed June 26, 2013
  54. [http://www.opencongress.org/people/show/400424_Melvin_Watt OpenCongress, "Melvin L. Watt," accessed August 8, 2013]
  55. GovTrack, "Melvin Watt" Accessed April 2013
  56. LegiStorm, "Melvin L. Watt," accessed October 1, 2012
  57. OpenSecrets.org,"Melvin Watt (D-NC), 2012," accessed February 18, 2014
  58. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," March 7, 2013
  59. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," accessed February 23, 2012
  60. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  61. Congressman Mel Watt, Serving North Carolina's 12th District, "About Mel"
Political offices
Preceded by
James Lockhart
{{{title}}}
2013-Present
Succeeded by
{{{after}}}
Preceded by
N/A
U.S. House of Representatives - North Carolina District 12
1993–2013
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
North Carolina State Senate
1985-1987
Succeeded by
'