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As of March 12, 2014, Brown has not reported any contributions or expenditures to the Chesapeake Voter Registrar's Office.
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Brown has not reported any contributions or expenditures to the Virginia State Board of Elections as of April 22, 2014.<ref>[http://www.sbe.virginia.gov/index.php/candidatepac-info/reporting/ ''Virginia State Board of Elections,'' "Reporting," accessed April 22, 2014]</ref>
  
 
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Revision as of 13:04, 22 April 2014

Michael David Brown
Michael D. Brown.jpg
Candidate for
Board member, Chesapeake School Board, At-large
Elections and appointments
Next generalMay 6, 2014
Term limitsN/A
Education
Bachelor'sOld Dominion University
Personal
ProfessionPolice officer
Websites
Campaign website
Michael David Brown campaign logo
Ballotpedia's school board candidate survey
Michael David Brown is a candidate for an at-large seat on the Chesapeake School Board in Virginia. He is seeking election to one of five seats on the board against nine other candidates during the general election on May 6, 2014.

Biography

Brown earned his bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from Old Dominion University in 1983. He has been a police officer with the Chesapeake Police Department since 1993. Brown and his wife, Patricia, have three children who have attended district schools.[1]

Elections

2014

See also: Chesapeake Public Schools elections (2014)

Opposition

Michael David Brown is seeking election to an at-large seat against incumbents Christie Craig, Harry A. Murphy and Michael J. Woods and six challengers during the general election on May 10, 2014. Current board members Bonita Billingsley Harris and Ann R. Wiggins did not file for re-election by the March 4 deadline.

Funding

Brown has not reported any contributions or expenditures to the Virginia State Board of Elections as of April 22, 2014.[2]

Endorsements

Brown received the endorsement of the Chesapeake Democratic Committee on March 14, 2014.[3]

Campaign themes

2014

Brown's campaign website explains his reasons for running in 2014:

I decided to become a candidate for the School Board because of the excellent education my children received from Indian River High School. I believe I have the ability to be an asset to each student attending our school system. I know the level of dedication and devotion faculty and staff place into getting our children ready for adulthood, college, trade schools, and of course employment. I believe this attitude is embraced throughout the school system. There is no shortage of teachers and faculty with the desire to deliver to our children the high quality education necessary to be competitive in today’s world. I want each school equipped with the tools and resources essential to affect high quality performance in both or teachers and each child; in order to achieve effective and efficient result. By accomplishing this goal, our school system will become the envy of other school systems across the region, state and nation.

[4]

—Michael David Brown's campaign website, (2014), [1]

About the district

See also: Chesapeake Public Schools, Virginia
Chesapeake Public Schools is located in Chesapeake, Virginia
Chesapeake Public Schools is located in Chesapeake, a city in southeastern Virginia. According to the United States Census Bureau, Chesapeake is home to 228,417 residents.[5] Chesapeake Public Schools is the seventh-largest school district in Virginia, serving 39,748 students during the 2010-11 school year.[6]

Demographics

Chesapeake underperformed in comparison to the rest of Virginia in terms of higher education achievement in 2010. The United States Census Bureau found that 28.4% of Chesapeake residents aged 25 years and older had attained a Bachelor's degree compared to 34.7% for Virginia as a whole. The median household income in Chesapeake was $70,244 compared to $63,636 for the state of Virginia. The poverty rate in Chesapeake was 8.3% compared to 11.1% for the entire state.[5]

Racial Demographics, 2010[5]
Race Chesapeake (%) Virginia (%)
White 62.6 68.6
Black or African American 29.8 19.4
American Indian and Alaska Native 0.4 0.4
Asian 2.9 5.5
Two or More Races 3.0 2.9
Hispanic or Latino 4.4 7.9

Presidential votes, 2000-2012[7]
Year Democratic vote (%) Republican vote (%)
2012 49.8 48.8
2008 50.2 48.9
2004 42.3 57.1
2000 45.2 53.2

Note: The United States Census Bureau considers "Hispanic or Latino" to be a place of origin rather than a race. Citizens may report both their race and their place of origin, and as a result, the percentages in each column of the racial demographics table may exceed 100 percent.[8][9]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term "Michael + Brown + Chesapeake + Public + Schools"

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Michael David Brown News Feed

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See also

External links

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Suggest a link

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Elect Michael David Brown, "Meet Michael David Brown," accessed April 16, 2014
  2. Virginia State Board of Elections, "Reporting," accessed April 22, 2014
  3. Jeff Sheler, The Virginian-Pilot, "Chesapeake Democrats announce endorsements," March 14, 2014
  4. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 United States Census Bureau, "Chesapeake, Virginia," accessed February 11, 2014
  6. National Center for Education Statistics, "ELSI Table Generator," accessed January 27, 2014
  7. Virginia State Board of Elections, "Election Results," accessed February 11, 2014
  8. United States Census Bureau, "Frequently Asked Questions," accessed April 21, 2014
  9. Each column will add up to 100 percent after removing the "Hispanic or Latino" place of origin percentages, although rounding by the Census Bureau may make the total one- or two-tenths off from being exactly 100 percent. This Ballotpedia page provides a more detailed explanation of how the Census Bureau handles race and ethnicity in its surveys.