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Michigan's 7th Congressional District elections, 2012

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Michigan's 7th Congressional District

General Election Date
November 6, 2012

Primary Date
August 7, 2012

November 6 Election Winner:
Tim Walberg Republican Party
Incumbent prior to election:
Tim Walberg Republican Party
Tim Walberg.jpg

Michigan U.S. House Elections
District 1District 2District 3District 4District 5District 6District 7District 8District 9District 10District 11District 12District 13District 14

2012 U.S. Senate Elections

Flag of Michigan.png
The 7th Congressional District of Michigan held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012.

Incumbent Tim Walberg won the election.[1]

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
May 15, 2012
August 7, 2012
November 6, 2012

Primary: Michigan has an open primary system, meaning any registered voter can vote in any party's primary.

Voter registration: Voters were required to register to vote in the primary by July 9. For the general election, the voter registration deadline was October 9.[2]

See also: Michigan elections, 2012

Incumbent: Incumbent Tim Walberg (R), who was first elected to the 7th District in 2010 and previously served from 2007 until 2009, ran for re-election. In redistricting, The Hill published a list of the Top Ten House Members who were helped by redistricting.[3] Walberg ranked 6th on the list.[3]

This was the first election using new district maps based on 2010 Census data. Michigan's 7th Congressional District is located in the southeastern region of the lower penninsula of Michigan and includes the city of Kalamazoo. It includes Eaton, Jackson, Branch, Hillsdale, Lenawee, Washeraw, and Monroe counties.[4]

This is the 7th Congressional District prior to the 2010 redistricting.

Candidates

General election candidates

Democratic Party Kurt R. Haskell
Republican Party Tim WalbergGreen check mark transparent.png
Libertarian Party Ken Proctor
Green Party Richard Wunsch


August 7, 2012, primary results

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Republican Party Republican Primary

Note: Mike Stahly initially appear on the official candidate list, but was later disqualified.[6]

Race background

Michigan's 7th was considered to be Leaning Republican according to the New York Times race ratings. Republican incumbent Tim Walberg was initially elected in 2006, lost the seat in 2008, and was re-elected in 2010. He faced Kurt R. Haskell (D) in the general election.[8]

Election results

General Election

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Kurt R. Haskell 43% 136,849
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTim Walberg Incumbent 53.3% 169,668
     Libertarian Ken Proctor 2.5% 8,088
     Green Richard Wunsch 1.1% 3,464
Total Votes 318,069
Source: Michigan Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Republican Primary

Michigan's 7th Congressional District Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngTim Walberg Incumbent 76% 45,590
Dan Davis 24% 14,386
Total Votes 59,976

Democratic Primary

Michigan's 7th Congressional District Democratic Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngKurt Haskell 66.7% 18,811
Ruben Marquez 33.3% 9,371
Total Votes 28,182

Impact of Redistricting

In redistricting, The Hill published a list of the Top Ten House Members who were helped by redistricting.[3] Tim Walberg ranked 6th on the list.[3] The article notes that Tim Walberg lost the district to centrist Mark Schauer (D) in 2008. He then beat Schauer in a rematch by 5 points in 2010. The redistricting process, controlled by Republicans, made sure to cut Schauer’s home base out of the district and made it a few points more Republican.[3] According to the article, Schauer said that he will not run for a rematch because of the new map.[3]

District partisanship

FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012 study

See also: FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012

In 2012, FairVote did a study on partisanship in the congressional districts, giving each a percentage ranking (D/R) based on the new 2012 maps and comparing that to the old 2010 maps. Michigan's 7th District became more Republican because of redistricting.[9]

  • 2012: 48D / 52R
  • 2010: 49D / 51R

Cook Political Report's PVI

See also: Cook Political Report's Partisan Voter Index

In 2012, Cook Political Report released its updated figures on the Partisan Voter Index, which measures each congressional district's partisanship relative to the rest of the country. Michigan's 7th Congressional District has a PVI of R+3, which is the 208th most Republican district in the country. In 2008, this district was won by Barack Obama (D), 52-48 percent over John McCain (R). In 2004, George W. Bush (R) won the district 55-45 percent over John Kerry (D).[10]

District History

2010

On November 2, 2010, Walberg won election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Mark H. Schauer (D), Greg Merle (L), Scott Eugene Aughney (U.S. Taxpayers), Richard Wunsch (G), and Danny Davis (Write-In) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House of Representatives, Michigan's 7th Congressional District, General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTim Walberg 50.2% 113,185
     Democratic Mark H. Schauer Incumbent 45.4% 102,402
     Libertarian Greg Merle 1.4% 3,239
     U.S. Taxpayers Scott Eugene Aughney 1.6% 3,705
     Green Richard Wunsch 1.4% 3,117
     Independent Danny Davis 0% 21
Total Votes 225,669

Campaign donors

Candidates for Congress were required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2012 elections season. Below are Walberg and Haskell's reports.

Tim Walberg

Tim Walberg(2012) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[12]March 31, 2012$600,299.88$176,278.79$(90,525.96)$686,052.71
July Quarterly[13]June 30, 2012$686,052.71$166,593.33$(146,579.79)$706,066.25
Pre-Primary[14]July 26, 2012$706,066.25$13,037.7$(39,697.41)$679,406.54
October Quarterly[15]October 15, 2012$679,406.54$156,031.59$(148,190.48)$687,247.65
Pre-General[16]October 25, 2012$687,247.65$41,447.14$(324,180.14)$40,451,465
Running totals
$553,388.55$(749,173.78)

Kurt Haskell

Kurt Haskell (2012) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[17]March 31, 2012$0.00$6,564.37$(6,361.87)$202.50
July Quarterly[18]June 30, 2012$202.50$6,109.56$(4,095.97)$2,216.09
Pre-Primary[19]August 28, 2012$2,216.09$2,593.65$(3,713.39)$1,096.35
October Quarterly[20]October 15, 2012$1,096.35$39,655.15$(40,256.31)$495.19
Pre-General[21]October 23, 2012$495.19$13,437.35$(4,992.94)$8,939.60
Running totals
$68,360.08$(59,420.48)

See also

External links

References

  1. Politico, "2012 Election Map, Michigan"
  2. Michigan Secretary of State, "2012 Registration Deadlines and Election Dates," accessed June 29, 2012
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 The Hill, "House members most helped by redistricting," accessed April 17, 2012
  4. Michigan Redistricting Map, "Map" Accessed August 31, 2012
  5. Secretary of State "2012 Unofficial Michigan Primary Candidate List" May 31, 2012
  6. 6.0 6.1 Secretary of State "2012 Unofficial Michigan Primary Candidate List" May 31, 2012
  7. Secretary of State "2012 Unofficial Michigan Primary Candidate List" May 31, 2012
  8. New York Times, "House Race Ratings," accessed August 10, 2012
  9. "2011 Redistricting and 2012 Elections in Michigan," September 2012
  10. Cook Political Report, "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008" Accessed October 2012
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010" Accessed December 23, 2011
  12. Federal Election Commission, "April Quarterly," accessed August 1, 2012
  13. Federal Election Commission, "July Quarterly," accessed August 1, 2012
  14. Federal Election Commission, "Pre-Primary," accessed November 6, 2012
  15. Federal Election Commission, "October Quarterly," accessed November 6, 2012
  16. Federal Election Commission, "Pre-General," accessed November 6, 2012
  17. Federal Election Commission, "April Quarterly," accessed August 1, 2012
  18. Federal Election Commission, "July Quarterly," accessed August 1, 2012
  19. Federal Election Commission, "Pre-Primary," accessed November 6, 2012
  20. Federal Election Commission, "October Quarterly," accessed November 6, 2012
  21. Federal Election Commission, "Pre-General," accessed November 6, 2012