Read the State Legislative Tracker. New edition available now!

Michigan's 7th Congressional District

From Ballotpedia
Revision as of 10:55, 22 May 2013 by Jlhaas (Talk | contribs)

Jump to: navigation, search
The 7th Congressional District of Michigan is a congressional district in southern Michigan.

Michigan's 7th Congressional District is located in the southeastern region of the lower penninsula of Michigan and includes the city of Kalamazoo. It includes Eaton, Jackson, Branch, Hillsdale, Lenawee, Washeraw and Monroe counties.[1]

It previously consisted of all of Branch, Eaton, Hillsdale, Jackson, and Lenawee counties, and included most of Calhoun and a large portion of western and northern Washtenaw counties.

The current representative of the 7th congressional district is Tim Walberg (R).

Elections

2012

See also: Michigan's 7th congressional district elections, 2012

The 7th congressional district of Michigan held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent Tim Walberg won re-election in the district.[2]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Kurt R. Haskell 43% 136,849
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTim Walberg Incumbent 53.3% 169,668
     Libertarian Ken Proctor 2.5% 8,088
     Green Richard Wunsch 1.1% 3,464
Total Votes 318,069
Source: Michigan Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Primary results

Republican Primary

Michigan's 7th Congressional District Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngTim Walberg Incumbent 76% 45,590
Dan Davis 24% 14,386
Total Votes 59,976

Democratic Primary

Michigan's 7th Congressional District Democratic Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngKurt Haskell 66.7% 18,811
Ruben Marquez 33.3% 9,371
Total Votes 28,182

2010
On November 2, 2010, Tim Walberg won election to the United States House. He defeated incumbent Mark Schauer (D), Scott Eugene Aughney (U.S. Taxpayers), Greg Merle (Libertarian), Richard Wunsch (Green) and Danny Davis (Write-in) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTim Walberg 50.2% 113,185
     Democratic Mark Schauer incumbent 45.4% 102,402
     U.S. Taxpayers Scott Eugene Aughney 1.6% 3,705
     Libertarian Greg Merle 1.4% 3,239
     Green Richard Wunsch 1.4% 3,117
     Write-in Danny Davis 0% 21
Total Votes 225,669

2008
On November 4, 2008, Mark Schauer won election to the United States House. He defeated incumbent Tim Walberg (R), Lynn Meadows (Green), Ken Proctor (Libertarian) and Sharon Renier (Write-in) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMark Schauer 48.8% 157,213
     Republican Tim Walberg incumbent 46.5% 149,781
     Green Lynn Meadows 3% 9,528
     Libertarian Ken Proctor 1.8% 5,675
     Write-in Sharon Renier 0% 89
Total Votes 322,286

2006
On November 7, 2006, Tim Walberg won election to the United States House. He defeated Sharon Marie Renier (D), Robert Hutchinson (Libertarian), David Horn (U.S. Taxpayers) and Joe Schwarz (Write-in) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTim Walberg 49.9% 122,348
     Democratic Sharon Marie Renier 46% 112,665
     Libertarian Robert Hutchinson 1.5% 3,788
     U.S. Taxpayers David Horn 1.5% 3,611
     Write-in Joe Schwarz 1.1% 2,614
Total Votes 245,026

2004
On November 2, 2004, Joe Schwarz won election to the United States House. He defeated Sharon Marie Renier (D), David Horn (U.S. Taxpayers), Jason Seagraves (G) and Kenneth Proctor (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJoe Schwarz 58.4% 176,053
     Democratic Sharon Marie Renier 36.3% 109,527
     U.S. Taxpayers David Horn 3% 9,032
     Green Jason Seagraves 1.3% 3,996
     Libertarian Kenneth Proctor 1% 3,034
Total Votes 301,642

2002
On November 5, 2002, Nick Smith won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Mike Simpson (D) and Ken Proctor (L) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngNick Smith incumbent 59.7% 121,142
     Democratic Mike Simpson 38.6% 78,412
     Libertarian Ken Proctor 1.7% 3,515
Total Votes 203,069

2000
On November 7, 2000, Nick Smith won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jennie Crittendon (D), Perry Spencer (Reform), Robert Broda, Jr. (L), Steve Cousino (U.S. Taxpayers) and Gail Anne Petrosoff (Natural Law) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngNick Smith incumbent 61.1% 147,369
     Democratic Jennie Crittendon 35.7% 86,080
     Reform Perry Spencer 1% 2,359
     Libertarian Robert Broda, Jr. 0.9% 2,158
     U.S. Taxpayers Steve Cousino 0.8% 1,878
     Natural Law Gail Anne Petrosoff 0.5% 1,159
     N/A Write-in 0% 7
Total Votes 241,010

1998
On November 3, 1998, Nick Smith won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jim Berryman (D), Kenneth Proctor (L) and Lynnea Ellison (Natural Law) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngNick Smith incumbent 57.5% 104,656
     Democratic Jim Berryman 40.1% 72,998
     Libertarian Kenneth Proctor 1.5% 2,684
     Natural Law Lynnea Ellison 1% 1,789
Total Votes 182,127

1996
On November 5, 1996, Nick Smith won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Kim Tunnicliff (D), Robert Broda, Jr. (L) and Scott Williamson (Natural Law) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngNick Smith incumbent 55% 120,227
     Democratic Kim Tunnicliff 42.9% 93,725
     Libertarian Robert Broda, Jr. 1.4% 3,090
     Natural Law Scott Williamson 0.7% 1,471
     N/A Write-in 0% 31
Total Votes 218,544

1994
On November 8, 1994, Nick Smith won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Kim McCaughtry (D), Kenneth Proctor (L) and Scott Williamson (Natural Law) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngNick Smith incumbent 65.1% 115,621
     Democratic Kim McCaughtry 32.3% 57,326
     Libertarian Kenneth Proctor 1.9% 3,311
     Natural Law Scott Williamson 0.7% 1,223
     N/A Scattering 0% 19
Total Votes 177,500

1992
On November 3, 1992, Nick Smith won election to the United States House. He defeated Kenneth Proctor (L) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngNick Smith 87.6% 133,972
     Libertarian Kenneth Proctor 12.3% 18,751
     N/A Write-in 0.1% 145
Total Votes 152,868

1990
On November 6, 1990, Dale Kildee won re-election to the United States House. He defeated David Morrill (R) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Michigan District 7 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngDale Kildee incumbent 68.4% 90,307
     Republican David Morrill 31.6% 41,759
     N/A Write-in 0% 2
Total Votes 132,068

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 7th congressional district of Michigan after the 2001 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Michigan

In 2011, the Michigan State Legislature re-drew the Congressional districts based on updated population information from the 2010 census.

In redistricting, The Hill published a list of the Top Ten House Members who were helped by redistricting.[14] Tim Walberg ranked 6th on the list.[14] The article notes that Tim Walberg lost the district to centrist Mark Schauer (D) in 2008. He then beat Schauer in a rematch by 5 points in 2010. The redistricting process, controlled by Republicans, made sure to cut Schauer’s home base out of the district and made it a few points more Republican.[14] According to the article, Schauer said that he will not run for a rematch because of the new map.[14]

External links

See also

References

  1. Michigan Redistricting Map "Map" accessed August 31, 2012
  2. Politico "2012 Election Map, Michigan"
  3. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  4. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  5. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  8. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  9. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 The Hill "House members most helped by redistricting" Accessed April 17, 2012