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Michigan Bingo Referendum, Proposal A (1996)

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The Michigan Bingo Referendum, also known as Proposal A, was a veto referendum on the November 5, 1996 election ballot in Michigan, where it was defeated.

The proposal sought to amend certain sections of Michigan Bingo Act.[1]

Election results

Michigan Proposal A (1996)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No1,936,19856.1%
Yes 1,511,063 43.8%

Official results via: The Michigan Manual 2009-2010

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

[NOTE: Because Proposal A failed to receive a majority of the vote, Public Act 118 is rejected and will not take effect.]

Proposal A is a referendum on Public Act 118 of 1994. Public Act 118 would amend the Bingo Act to specify that the term "qualified organization" would not include a candidate committee, political committee, political party committee, ballot question committee, independent committee, or any other committee as defined by and organized pursuant to the Michigan Campaign Finance Act. This means that if Public Act 118 is in effect, political parties, or other political organizations organized for political purposes, will be banned from conducting, and thus receiving revenue from, bingo games.

Public Act 118 also would increase the aggregate value of prizes distributed for a charity game from 60% to 65% of the resale value of all charity game tickets for that game; and increase from $200 to $300 the single maximum prize for a charity game.

Public Act 118 had been scheduled to take effect on April 1, 1995. The Act was suspended after sufficient referendum petitions were filed with the Secretary of State pursuant to Article 2, Section 9 of the State Constitution (which reserves to the electors the power to approve or reject laws enacted by the Legislature). If a majority of the voters cast "yes" votes on Proposal A, Public Act 118 will become law.

See also

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References