SLP Badge Transparent.png
Read the
State Legislative Tracker
New edition available now!




Difference between revisions of "Mike Pence"

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(External links: params)
Line 64: Line 64:
  
 
Before entering politics, Pence built a resume covering a wide array of professions. His background includes working as an admissions counselor at his alma mater, Hanover College, as well as an attorney and a talk show host.<ref name=pvs/>  
 
Before entering politics, Pence built a resume covering a wide array of professions. His background includes working as an admissions counselor at his alma mater, Hanover College, as well as an attorney and a talk show host.<ref name=pvs/>  
 +
 +
An analysis of Republican governors by Nate Silver of the ''New York Times'' in April 2013 ranked Pence as the 2nd most conservative governor in the country.<ref> [http://fivethirtyeight.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/16/in-state-governments-signs-of-a-healthier-g-o-p/?smid=tw-share&_r=0 ''New York Times,'' "In State Governments, Signs of a Healthier G.O.P.," April 16, 2013]</ref>
  
 
Pence will come up for re-election for the first time in November of 2016. He has not yet stated whether he intends to seek another term in the governorship.
 
Pence will come up for re-election for the first time in November of 2016. He has not yet stated whether he intends to seek another term in the governorship.

Revision as of 14:24, 2 July 2013

Mike Pence
Mike Pence.jpg
Governor of Indiana
Incumbent
In office
January 14, 2013 - Present
Term ends
2017
Years in position 1
PartyRepublican
PredecessorMitch Daniels (R)
Compensation
Base salary$111,688
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First electedNovember 6, 2012
Next generalNovember 8, 2016
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
U.S. House of Representatives, Indiana, District 6
2001-2013
Education
High schoolColumbus North High School
Bachelor'sHanover College (1981)
J.D.Indiana University School of Law (1986)
Personal
BirthdayJune 7, 1959
Place of birthColumbus, Indiana
ProfessionAttorney, Talk Show Host
ReligionEvangelical Christian
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
Michael Richard "Mike" Pence (b. June 7, 1959) is the 50th and current Republican Governor of Indiana. He is serving his first term, having won the seat in 2012. He ran unopposed in the Republican primary, and defeated former House Speaker John Gregg (D), Rupert Boneham (L) and write-in candidate Donnie Harold Harris in the general election on November 6, 2012.

Pence was sworn into office on January 14, 2013, and his term will expire in January of 2017.

From 2001 to 2013, Pence served as a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives. As a congressman, he maintained a record of staunch opposition to tax hikes and federal health care reform as outlined under the Affordable Care Act. His final year in the U.S. House, Pence was rated a "far-right Republican leader" based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack.[1]

Before entering politics, Pence built a resume covering a wide array of professions. His background includes working as an admissions counselor at his alma mater, Hanover College, as well as an attorney and a talk show host.[2]

An analysis of Republican governors by Nate Silver of the New York Times in April 2013 ranked Pence as the 2nd most conservative governor in the country.[3]

Pence will come up for re-election for the first time in November of 2016. He has not yet stated whether he intends to seek another term in the governorship.

Biography

Pence was born in Columbus, Indiana, graduated from Hanover College in 1981 and earned his J.D. from Indiana University School of Law in 1986.[4]

After graduating from Hanover, Pence worked as an admissions counselor at the college until 1983. He then went to law school and worked as a private practice attorney from 1986 to 1990. From 1991 to 1994 he served as President of the Indiana Policy Review Foundation and was a talk show host on Network Indiana from 1994 to 2000.[2]

Political career

Indiana Governor (2013-Present)

Pence has served as governor of Indiana since January 14, 2013.[5]

Issues

Veto override

On June 19, 2013, the Indiana legislature overturned Pence's veto of a bill that would retroactively authorize a local tax. Lawmakers overrode the governor's veto in a 68-23 vote in the House and 34-12 vote in the Senate[6] With an interesting twist, Republican legislators overwhelmingly voted against the Republican Governor, while most Democrats supported his veto.[7] One of three bills vetoed by Pence during the session, the Jackson-Pulaski tax fix addressed a 15 year old county income tax which had been imposed to fund the construction of jail facilities with the stipulation that the tax be lowered by 1% after the first several years. The reduction was not implemented and thus county residents paid an additional 1% tax that they were legally not required to pay. The bill that was passed by a huge majority of legislatures and subsequently vetoed by Pence, would allow that money to be kept and not returned to the tax payers as would have otherwise been necessary.[8]

Pence’s communications director Christy Denault, said that he “stands by his veto, and regrets that it was not upheld by the Indiana General Assembly today. While this bill contained some positive provisions, the Governor believes that when Hoosiers pay taxes that are not owed, they should be offered relief. Hoosiers can be assured that Governor Pence and his administration will continue to put taxpayers first.”[7] Republicans argued that the veto itself would be unfair for taxpayers as state tax payers would have to make up the money spent on calculating refunds to the tax payers in Jackson and Pulaski counties. The bill also included tax breaks and benefits for veterans and veteran families that many legislators were unwilling to see vetoed. “Sustaining this veto will be a tax increase on the innocent spouses of disabled (and) deceased veterans, a tax increase through no fault of their own,” said Senator Brandt Hershman (R-7). “Sustaining the veto will be a vote against the innocent taxpayers in Pulaski and Jackson counties who still regardless of our action here ... have to fund a jail.”[7]

Tax reform

Pence made tax reform, namely a 10 percent income-tax rate cut, a priority for 2013.[9] While he did not get the 10 percent cut he advocated, Pence did accomplish his goal of cutting state taxes. Legislators cut the income tax by 5 percent and also killed the death tax. Speaker of the House Brian Bosma (R) said of the deal, “What we ended up doing was putting together a collective tax package that results in the largest tax cut in our state’s history, about $1.1 billion dollars.”[10]

U.S. House of Representatives (2001-2013)

Committee Assignments

2011-2012

Issues

Specific votes

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "No" Pence voted against the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was one of 151 Republicans that voted against the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257/167 vote on January 1, 2013.[11]

Controversies

Obamacare and 9/11

During a June 2012 GOP House meeting, Pence was reported to have compared the U.S. Supreme Court's decision on "Obamacare" to the terrorist attacks of September 11. Pence immediately apologized, stating, "My remarks at the Republican Conference following the Supreme Court decision were thoughtless. I certainly did not intend to minimize any tragedy our nation has faced and I apologize."[12]

Analysis

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Pence paid his congressional staff a total of $1,122,773 in 2011. He ranked 9th on the list of the highest paid Republican Representative Staff Salaries and he ranked 49th overall of the highest paid Representative Staff Salaries in 2011. Overall, Indiana ranked 35th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[13]

Staff bonuses

According to an analysis by CNN, Pence is one of nearly 25% of House members who gave their staff bonuses in 2012. Pence's staff was given an apparent $32,909.25 in bonus money.[14]

2011 Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, Pence's net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $11,015 and $169,000. That averages to $90,007.50, which was lower than the average net worth of Republican Representatives in 2010 of $7,561,133.[15]

2011 National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of congress voted in the previous year. Pence ranked 19th in the conservative rankings.[16]

Voting with party

2011

Mike Pence voted with the Republican Party 94 of the time, which ranked 74 among the 242 House Republican members as of November 2011.[17]

Elections

2012

See also: Indiana gubernatorial election, 2012

Pence won election as Governor of Indiana in 2012.[18] He was slated to face Fishers businessman Jim Wallace in the May 8, 2012 Republican primary election, but Wallace was removed from the ballot by the Indiana Election Commission on February 24, 2012[19][20] for failing to receive the requisite 500 signatures per congressional district. Thus, Pence was unopposed in the partisan primary, and defeated former House Speaker John Gregg (D), Rupert Boneham (L) and write-in candidate Donnie Harold Harris in the general election on November 6, 2012.

Governor/Lieutenant Governor of Indiana General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic John Gregg / Vi Simpson 46.6% 1,200,016
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMike Pence / Sue Ellspermann 49.5% 1,275,424
     Libertarian Rupert Boneham / Brad Klopfenstein 4% 101,868
     Independent Donnie Harold Harris / George Fish 0% 21
Total Votes 2,577,329
Election Results via Indiana Secretary of State.


Governor of Indiana Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngMike Pence 100% 554,412
Total Votes 554,412
Election Results Via:Indiana Secretary of State.


Issue positions

  • Economic development:

In terms of economic development, Pence said he would seek to make the system more proactive. "We would identify personnel in the IEDC with essentially an investment background that we would recruit and say, 'We want you to go to each community in this state and evaluate the assets on the ground. And we want you to meet with business leaders,'" he stated.[21]

  • Health Insurance:

In a letter to Gov. Mitch Daniels (R) in August 2012, Pence said that if elected governor he would not set up a health insurance exchange in Indiana, leaving the job to the federal government instead. “I believe Indiana should take no part in this deeply flawed health care bureaucracy,” he stated.[22]

  • Jobs:

The major issue of the 2012 campaign was jobs, with each candidate detailing their plan to get citizens back to work. Pence said he would create a "jobs Cabinet" made up of business leaders and investment specialists that would support startup businesses.[23]

Endorsements

Pence's endorsements included:

  • Indiana National Federation of Independent Business[24]

2010

On November 2, 2010, Pence won re-election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Barry Welsh (D) and Talmage "T.J" Thompson, Jr. (L) in the general election.[25]

U.S. House of Representatives, Indiana's 6th Congressional District, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMike Pence Incumbent 66.6% 126,027
     Democratic Barry Welsh 29.9% 56,647
     Libertarian Talmage "T.J" Thompson, Jr. 3.5% 6,635
Total Votes 189,309

Campaign donors

2012

Pence won re-election to the position of Governor of Indiana in 2012. During that election cycle, Pence raised a total of $14,841,352.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Pence's campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Pence won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010. During that re-election cycle, Pence's campaign committee raised a total of $2,684,316 and spent $2,654,178 .[26]

U.S. House of Representatives, Indiana's 6th Congressional District, 2010 - Mike Pence Campaign Contributions
Total Raised $2,684,316
Total Spent $2,654,178
Total Raised by General Election Opponent $115
Total Spent by General Election Opponent $5,604
Top contributors to Mike Pence's campaign committee
Krieg Devault LLP$18,700
Blue Cross/Blue Shield$18,000
Eli Lilly & Co$17,200
Wells Fargo$15,498
Pence-Friedel Developers$14,400
Top 5 industries that contributed to campaign committee
Retired$235,200
Securities & Investment$113,564
Republican/Conservative$106,205
Health Professionals$84,283
Lawyers/Law Firms$83,888

Personal

Pence and his wife Karen have been married for 26 years, and are based in Columbus, Indiana. They have three children, Michael, Charlotte and Audrey.[4]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term "Mike + Pence + Indiana + Governor"

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

  • Loading...

See also

External links

Congress


References

  1. Gov Track "Pence" Accessed May 23, 2012
  2. 2.0 2.1 Project Vote Smart, "Representative Mike Pence's Biography," accessed November 2, 2012
  3. New York Times, "In State Governments, Signs of a Healthier G.O.P.," April 16, 2013
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Congressman Mike Pence "Biography" Accessed November 5, 2011
  5. NWI Politics, "Republican Mike Pence sworn-in as Indiana governor," January 14, 2013
  6. Ind. lawmakers override Pence on local tax measure
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Indiana lawmakers override Gov. Mike Pence's veto, resolve county tax mixup
  8. Legislature Overrides Pence Veto of Jackson-Pulaski Tax Fix
  9. Wall Street Journal, "The State Tax Reformers," January 29, 2013
  10. National Review, " Governor Pence’s Indiana-Tax Win," May 7, 2013
  11. U.S. House "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.
  12. Politico, "Pence likens health care ruling to 9/11," June 28, 2012
  13. LegiStorm "Mike Pence"
  14. CNN Politics, "Congressional bonuses in a time of cuts," accessed March 8, 2013
  15. OpenSecrets.org, "Pence, (R-Indiana), 2010"
  16. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  17. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  18. Reuters "Congressman Mike Pence to run for Indiana governor," June 11, 2011
  19. Courier Journal, "Indiana election panel strikes GOP gubernatorial hopeful Jim Wallace from ballot," February 25, 2012
  20. Indy Star, "GOP gubernatorial candidate Jim Wallace removed from Indiana primary ballot, leaving Mike Pence unopposed," February 25, 2012
  21. South Bend Tribune, "Governors race ready to ramp up," May 13, 2012
  22. Evansville Courier & Press, "Pence says he would decline to set up state-level health insurance exchange," August 21, 2012
  23. The Herald Bulletin, "Ind. governor hopefuls detail jobs ideas for race," May 13, 2012
  24. Mike Pence, "Pence Campaign Announces Endorsement by Indiana NFIB," August 22, 2012
  25. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010"
  26. Open Secrets "Mike Pence 2010 Election Cycle," Accessed November 5, 2011
Political offices
Preceded by
Mitch Daniels (R)
Indiana Governor
January 14, 2013-Present
Succeeded by
NA
Preceded by
David McIntosh
U.S. House of Representatives - Indiana District 6
2001–2013
Succeeded by
Luke Messer (R)