Mike Rogers (Michigan)

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Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers.jpg
U.S. House, Michigan, District 8
Incumbent
In office
January 3, 2001-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 13
PartyRepublican
PredecessorDebbie Stabenow (D)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First electedNovember 7, 2000
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Campaign $$11,895,153
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Michigan State Senate
1995-2000
Education
Bachelor'sAdrian College
Military service
Service/branchUnited States Army
Years of service1985-1989
Personal
BirthdayJune 2, 1963
Place of birthLivingston County, MI
ProfessionFBI Special Agent
Net worth$2,595,510
ReligionMethodist
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
Michael J. "Mike" Rogers (b. June 2, 1963 in Livingston County, Michigan) is a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives representing Michigan's 8th congressional district. Rogers was first elected to the House in 2000.

Rogers most recently won re-election in 2012. He defeated Lance Enderle (D), Daniel Goebel (L), and Preston Brooks (I) in the general election on November 6, 2012.

Rogers began his political career in the Michigan State Senate, where he served from 1995 to 2000.

Despite speculation that Rogers would run for the open Senate seat currently occupied by Sen. Carl Levin, who is among the Congressional members who have announced their decision to not run in 2014, Rogers announced on June 14, 2013 that he would instead run for re-election to his U.S. House seat. In a letter to supporters he stated, "For me, the significance and depth of the impact I can make on my constituent’s behalf far outweighs the perceived importance of any title I might hold."[1]

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Rogers is an average Republican member of Congress, meaning he will vote with the Republican Party on the majority of bills.

Biography

Rogers was born in 1963 in Livingston County, MI. After graduating from Adrian College in 1985, Rogers went on to serve in the U.S. Army from 1985 to 1989. Prior to his political career, Rogers worked as a Special Agent in the FBI.[2]

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Rogers' professional and political career[2]:

  • U.S. Army, 1985-1989
  • Special Agent, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1989-1994
  • Michigan State Senate, 1995-2000
  • U.S. House of Representatives, 8th Congressional District of Michigan, 2001-Present

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Rogers serves on the following committees:[3]

2011-2012

Rogers served on the following House committees[4]:

Issues

Specific votes

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Rogers voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was one of 85 Republicans who voted in favor of the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257/167 vote on January 1, 2013.[5]

Campaign themes

2012

  • Health Care

Excerpt: "Mike co-authored legislation to repeal ObamaCare’s $716 billion dollar cut to Medicare. Mike voted to repeal ObamaCare’s unelected Medicare board, which would allow government bureaucrats to slash seniors’ benefits."[6]

Elections

2014

See also: Michigan's 8th congressional district elections, 2014 and United States Senate elections in Michigan, 2014

Despite speculation that Rogers would run for the open Senate seat currently occupied by Sen. Carl Levin, who is among the Congressional members who have announced their decision to not run in 2014, Rogers announced on June 14, 2013, that he would instead run for re-election to his U.S. House seat. In a letter to supporters he stated, "For me, the significance and depth of the impact I can make on my constituent’s behalf far outweighs the perceived importance of any title I might hold."[7]

2012

See also: Michigan's 8th congressional district elections, 2012

Rogers won re-election in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Michigan's 8th District.[8] He defeated Vernon Molnar and Brian Hetrick in the August 7 Republican primary. He then defeated Lance Enderle (D), Daniel Goebel (L), and Preston Brooks (I) in the general election on November 6, 2012.[9]

U.S. House, Michigan District 8 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Lance Enderle 37.3% 128,657
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMike Rogers Incumbent 58.6% 202,217
     Libertarian Daniel Goebel 2.3% 8,083
     Independent Preston Brooks 1.8% 6,097
Total Votes 345,054
Source: Michigan Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"
Michigan's 8th Congressional District Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngMike Rogers Incumbent 85.6% 56,060
Vernon Molnar 5% 3,296
Brian Hetrick 9.3% 6,098
Total Votes 65,454

Endorsements

  • Livingston County Daily Press and Argus
  • The Detroit News

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Rogers is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Rogers raised a total of $11,895,153 during that time period. This information was last updated on May 16, 2013.[16]

Mike Rogers (Michigan)'s Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 US House (Michigan, District 8) Won $1,921,587
2010 US House (Michigan, District 8) Won $1,778,687
2008 US House (Michigan, District 8) Won $1,384,974
2006 US House (Michigan, District 8) Won $1,487,893
2004 US House (Michigan, District 8) Won $1,473,630
2002 US House (Michigan, District 8) Won $1,624,149
2000 US House (Michigan, District 8) Won $2,224,233
Grand Total Raised $11,895,153

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Rogers’ reports.[17]

Mike Rogers (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[18]April 15, 2013$1,284,379.27$165,898.68$(42,568.76)$1,407,709.19
July Quarterly[19]July 15, 2013$1,407,709.19$421,604.40$(136,013.38)$1,693,300.21
Running totals
$587,503.08$(178,582.14)

Defense contractors

According to a July 2013 Politico report, Rogers made the top 10 list of Hill members receiving defense industry contributions. As of July 2013, Rogers had received more than $48,000 from top defense firms.[20]

2012

Breakdown of the source of Rogers' campaign funds before the 2012 election.

Rogers won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2012. During that election cycle, Rogers' campaign committee raised a total $1,921,587 of and spent $1,726,144.[21]

Cost per vote

Rogers spent $8.54 per vote received in 2012.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Rogers' campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Rogers won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010. During that election cycle, Rogers' campaign committee raised a total of $1,778,687 and spent $861,244.[22]

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Rogers is a "rank-and-file Republican" as of June 2013.[23]

Like-minded colleagues

The website Open Congress, tracks whom from each party each member of Congress votes most and least often with.[24]

Rogers most often votes with:

Rogers least often votes with:

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Rogers missed 169 of 8,653 roll call votes from Jan 2001 to Mar 2013, which is 2.0% of votes during that period. This is better than the median of 2.2% among the lifetime records of representatives currently serving.[25]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Rogers paid his congressional staff a total of $1,013,603 in 2011. Overall, Michigan ranked 13th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[26]

2010

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Rogers paid his congressional staff a total of $1,013,603 in 2011. He ranked 37th on the list of the highest paid Republican Representative Staff Salaries and he ranked 151st overall of the highest paid Representative Staff Salaries in 2011. Overall, Michigan ranked 13th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[27]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, Rogers' net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $1,626,020 and $3,565,000. This averages to $2,595,510, which is a 0.1523% increase since 2010. This is lower than the $7,859,232 average net worth for Republican representatives in 2011.[28]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, Rogers' net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $136,011 and $391,000. That averages to $263,505.50, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican Representatives in 2010 of $7,561,133.[29]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

Each year, National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted, as compared to other members in the previous year. More information about the analysis process can be found on the vote ratings page.

2012

According to the data released in 2013, Rogers was ranked the 64th most conservative representative during 2012.[30]

2011

According to the data released in 2012, Mike Rogers was ranked the 71st most conservative representative during 2011.[31]

Voting with party

2013

Mike Rogers voted with the Republican Party 98.2% of the time, which ranked 32nd among the 233 House Republican members as of June 2013.[32]

Personal

Rogers is married and has two children.[33]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Mike + Rogers + Michigan + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

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External links


References

  1. Politico, "Mike Rogers passes on Michigan Senate run," June 13, 2013
  2. 2.0 2.1 Biographical Guide to Members of Congress, "Mike Rogers," Accessed December 23, 2011
  3. CQ.com, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress"
  4. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "House of Representatives Committee Assignments," Accessed December 23, 2011
  5. U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff," Accessed January 4, 2013
  6. Mike Rogers, "Medicare," Accessed October 8, 2012
  7. Politico, "Mike Rogers passes on Michigan Senate run," June 13, 2013
  8. Politico, "2012 Election Map, Michigan"
  9. Associated Press primary results
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  15. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  16. Open Secrets, "Career Fundraising for Mike Rogers," Accessed May 16, 2013
  17. Federal Election Commission "Mike Rogers Summary Report," Accessed July 30, 2013
  18. Federal Election Commission "Mike Rogers April Quarterly," Accessed July 30, 2013
  19. Federal Election Commission "Mike Rogers July Quarterly," Accessed July 30, 2013
  20. Politico, "Top 10 Hill recipients of defense contributions," Accessed July 11, 2013
  21. Open Secrets, "2012 Re-Election Cycle," Accessed February 15, 2013
  22. Open Secrets "Mike Rogers 2010 Election Cycle," Accessed December 23, 2011
  23. GovTrack, "Mike Rogers," Accessed June 7 2013
  24. OpenCongress, "Mike Rogers," Accessed August 6, 2013
  25. GovTrack, "Mike Rogers," Accessed April 2013
  26. LegiStorm, "Tim Walberg"
  27. LegiStorm, "Mike Rogers"
  28. Open Secrets, "Rogers, (R-Michigan), 2011"
  29. Open Secrets, "Rogers, (R-Michigan), 2010"
  30. National Journal, "TABLE: House Liberal Scores by Issue Area," February 26, 2013
  31. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  32. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  33. Official House Site "Biography," Accessed December 23, 2011
Political offices
Preceded by
Debbie Stabenow
U.S. House of Representatives - Michigan District 8
2001-present
Succeeded by
-