Difference between revisions of "Mississippi State Legislature"

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::''See also: [[Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions]]''
 
::''See also: [[Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions]]''
  
In 2014, the Legislature was in session from January 7 through April 3.
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In 2014, the Legislature was in session from January 7 through April 2.<ref>[http://www.statescape.com/Resources/Sessions/Sessions.aspx?h=&year=2014 ''StateScape'', "Session Schedules," accessed July 29, 2014]</ref>
  
 
====Major issues====
 
====Major issues====
Major issues in the 2014 legislative session included [[Common Core]], Medicaid expansion, teachers' pay and prison sentences.<ref>[http://www.wdam.com/story/24387917/mississippi-legislature-begins-2014-session ''WDAM'', "Mississippi legislature begins 2014 session," January 7, 2014. Accessed January 11, 2014]</ref><ref>[http://blog.gulflive.com/mississippi-press-news/2014/01/what_to_watch_for_13_issues_fo.html ''GulfLive.com'', "13 things to watch in the 2014 Mississippi Legislature," January 3, 2014. Accessed January 11, 2014]</ref><ref>[http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/caffa561faeb408c94da59a904e2154d/MS-XGR--Mississippi-Legislature ''The Associated Press'', "Mississippi lawmakers face demands from citizens even as they seek to hold down spending," January 7, 2014. Accessed January 11, 2014]</ref>
+
Major issues in the 2014 legislative session included [[Common Core]], Medicaid expansion, teachers' pay and prison sentences.<ref>[http://www.wdam.com/story/24387917/mississippi-legislature-begins-2014-session ''WDAM'', "Mississippi legislature begins 2014 session," January 7, 2014]</ref><ref>[http://blog.gulflive.com/mississippi-press-news/2014/01/what_to_watch_for_13_issues_fo.html ''GulfLive.com'', "13 things to watch in the 2014 Mississippi Legislature," January 3, 2014. Accessed January 11, 2014]</ref><ref>[http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/caffa561faeb408c94da59a904e2154d/MS-XGR--Mississippi-Legislature ''The Associated Press'', "Mississippi lawmakers face demands from citizens even as they seek to hold down spending," January 7, 2014]</ref>
  
 
===2013===
 
===2013===
 
::''See also: [[Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions]]''
 
::''See also: [[Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions]]''
In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 8 to April 7.
+
In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 8 to April 7.<ref>[http://www.statescape.com/Resources/Sessions/Sessions.aspx?h=&year=2013 ''StateScape'', "Session Schedules," accessed July 29, 2014]</ref>
  
 
====Major issues====
 
====Major issues====
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===2012===
 
===2012===
 
::''See also: [[Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions]]''
 
::''See also: [[Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions]]''
In 2012, the Legislature was in session from January 3 through May 3.<ref>[http://www.statescape.com/resources/Sessions/Sessions.aspx ''StateScape,'' Session schedules, accessed April 30, 2012]</ref>
+
In 2012, the Legislature was in session from January 3 through May 3.<ref>[https://web.archive.org/web/20120422164445/http://www.statescape.com/resources/Sessions/Sessions.aspx ''StateScape,'' "Session Schedules," accessed July 29, 2014] (Archived)</ref>
  
 
===2011===
 
===2011===
In 2011, the Legislature was in session from January 4 through April 7.<ref>[http://billstatus.ls.state.ms.us/ Mississippi State Legislature]</ref>
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In 2011, the Legislature was in session from January 4 through April 7.<ref>[http://billstatus.ls.state.ms.us/2011/pdf/list_dar.htm ''Mississippi State Legislature'', "2011 Daily Action Reports," accessed July 29, 2014]</ref>
  
 
===2010===
 
===2010===
In 2010, the Legislature was originally scheduled to be [[Dates of 2010 state legislative sessions| in session]] from January 5th to April 3rd.  However, the session was extended to May 3rd.  Additionally, a special session was held that convened on April 22nd and adjourned on April 23rd.<ref>[http://www.ncsl.org/?tabid=18630 2010 session dates for Mississippi Legislature]</ref>
+
In 2010, the Legislature was originally scheduled to be [[Dates of 2010 state legislative sessions| in session]] from January 5th to April 3rd.  However, the session was extended to May 3rd.  Additionally, a special session was held that convened on April 22nd and adjourned on April 23rd.<ref>[https://web.archive.org/web/20130608215241/http://www.ncsl.org/legislatures-elections/legislatures/2010-legislative-session-calendar.aspx ''National Conference of State Legislatures'', "2010 Legislative Session Calendar," accessed March 24, 2014] (Archived)</ref>
 +
 
 
===Role in state budget===
 
===Role in state budget===
 
::''See also: [[Mississippi state budget]]''
 
::''See also: [[Mississippi state budget]]''
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===When sworn in===
 
===When sworn in===
 
 
:: ''See also: [[When state legislators assume office after a general election]]
 
:: ''See also: [[When state legislators assume office after a general election]]
  
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==Senate==
 
==Senate==
 
+
The Mississippi Senate is the upper house of the Mississippi Legislature. The Senate is composed of 52 Senators representing an equal amount of constituent districts. Each member represents an average of [[Population represented by state legislators|57,063 residents]], as of the 2010 Census.<ref>[http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-01.pdf ''U.S. Census Bureau'', "Population Distribution and Change: 2000 to 2010," April 2011]</ref> After the 2000 Census, each member represented [[Population represented by state legislators|54,705]].<ref>[http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t2/tables/tab01.pdf ''U.S. Census Bureau,'' "States Ranked by Population," April 2, 2001]</ref> Senators serve four-year terms with no [[term limits]].  
The Mississippi Senate is the upper house of the Mississippi Legislature. The Senate is composed of 52 Senators representing an equal amount of constituent districts. Each member represents an average of [[Population represented by state legislators|57,063 residents]], as of the 2010 Census.<ref>[http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-01.pdf ''U.S. Census Bureau'', "Population Distribution and Change: 2000 to 2010," April 2011]</ref> After the 2000 Census, each member represented [[Population represented by state legislators|54,705]].<ref>[http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t2/tables/tab01.pdf ''U.S. Census Bureau,'' "States Ranked by Population," April 2, 2001. Accessed February 13, 2014]</ref> Senators serve four-year terms with no [[term limits]].  
+
  
 
Like other upper houses of state and territorial legislatures and the federal U.S. Senate, the Senate can confirm or reject gubernatorial appointments to the state cabinet, commissions and boards.
 
Like other upper houses of state and territorial legislatures and the federal U.S. Senate, the Senate can confirm or reject gubernatorial appointments to the state cabinet, commissions and boards.
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==House of Representatives==
 
==House of Representatives==
 
 
The House of Representatives is the lower house of the Mississippi State Legislature. According to the state [[constitution]] of 1890, this body is to comprise no more than 122 members elected for four-year terms ([[Article IV, Mississippi Constitution#Section 34|Section 34]]). To qualify as a member of the house candidates must (a) be at least 21 years old, (b) have been a resident of Mississippi for at least four years, and (c) have resided in the district in which he/she is running for at least two years ([[Article IV, Mississippi Constitution#Section 41|Sections 41]], [[Article IV, Mississippi Constitution#Section 44|44]] and [[Article IV, Mississippi Constitution#Section 45|45]]).  Current state law provides for the maximum number of members.  Elections are held the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.
 
The House of Representatives is the lower house of the Mississippi State Legislature. According to the state [[constitution]] of 1890, this body is to comprise no more than 122 members elected for four-year terms ([[Article IV, Mississippi Constitution#Section 34|Section 34]]). To qualify as a member of the house candidates must (a) be at least 21 years old, (b) have been a resident of Mississippi for at least four years, and (c) have resided in the district in which he/she is running for at least two years ([[Article IV, Mississippi Constitution#Section 41|Sections 41]], [[Article IV, Mississippi Constitution#Section 44|44]] and [[Article IV, Mississippi Constitution#Section 45|45]]).  Current state law provides for the maximum number of members.  Elections are held the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.
  
Each member represents an average of [[Population represented by state legislators|24,322 residents]], as of the 2010 Census.<ref>[http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-01.pdf ''U.S. Census Bureau'', "Population Distribution and Change: 2000 to 2010," April 2011]</ref> After the 2000 Census, each member represented [[Population represented by state legislators|23,317]].<ref>[http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t2/tables/tab01.pdf ''U.S. Census Bureau,'' "States Ranked by Population," April 2, 2001. Accessed February 13, 2014]</ref>
+
Each member represents an average of [[Population represented by state legislators|24,322 residents]], as of the 2010 Census.<ref>[http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-01.pdf ''U.S. Census Bureau'', "Population Distribution and Change: 2000 to 2010," April 2011]</ref> After the 2000 Census, each member represented [[Population represented by state legislators|23,317]].<ref>[http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t2/tables/tab01.pdf ''U.S. Census Bureau,'' "States Ranked by Population," April 2, 2001]</ref>
  
 
The Constitution also specifies that the legislature shall meet for 125 days every four years and 90 days in all other years ([[Article IV, Mississippi Constitution#Section 36|Section 36 of Article 4]]).
 
The Constitution also specifies that the legislature shall meet for 125 days every four years and 90 days in all other years ([[Article IV, Mississippi Constitution#Section 36|Section 36 of Article 4]]).
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Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.
 
Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.
  
'''Mississippi State House of Representatives:'''
+
'''Mississippi House of Representatives:'''
From 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the Mississippi State House of Representatives for the first 20 years while the Republicans were the majority for the last two years. The Mississippi State House of Representatives is one of 18 state Houses that was Democratic for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. The final three years of the study depicted a shift not only in the Mississippi House but in the entire state government to the Republican party with the last two years being Republican [[trifectas]].
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From 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the Mississippi House of Representatives for the first 20 years while the Republicans were the majority for the last two years. The Mississippi State House of Representatives is one of 18 state Houses that was Democratic for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. The final three years of the study depicted a shift not only in the Mississippi House but in the entire state government to the Republican party with the last two years being Republican [[trifectas]].
  
 
Across the country, there were 577 Democratic and 483 Republican State Houses of Representatives from 1992 to 2013.
 
Across the country, there were 577 Democratic and 483 Republican State Houses of Representatives from 1992 to 2013.
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==External links==
 
==External links==
 
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{{submit a leg link}}
 
* [http://billstatus.ls.state.ms.us Mississippi Legislature]
 
* [http://billstatus.ls.state.ms.us Mississippi Legislature]
 
* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mississippi_Legislature Wikipedia: Mississippi Legislature]
 
* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mississippi_Legislature Wikipedia: Mississippi Legislature]

Latest revision as of 18:27, 29 July 2014

Mississippi State Legislature

Seal of Mississippi.jpg
General Information
Type:   State legislature
Term limits:   None
2014 session start:   January 7, 2014
Website:   Official Legislature Page
Leadership
Senate President:   Tate Reeves (R)
House Speaker:  Philip Gunn (R)
Structure
Members:  52 (Senate), 122 (House)
Length of term:   4 years (Senate), 4 years (House)
Authority:   Art V, Mississippi Constitution
Salary:   $10,000./year + per diem
Elections
Last Election:  November 8, 2011
52 seats (Senate)
November 8, 2011
122 seats (House)
Next election:  November 3, 2015
52 seats (Senate)
November 3, 2015
122 seats (House)
Redistricting:  Mississippi Legislature has control
The Mississippi State Legislature is the state legislature of the state of Mississippi. The bicameral legislature is comprised of the lower Mississippi House of Representatives, with 122 members, and the upper Mississippi State Senate, with 52 members. Both Representatives and Senators serve four-year terms without term limits.

The Legislature convenes at the Mississippi State Capitol in Jackson, Mississippi.

The rights, responsibilities, privileges and expectations of the state legislature are defined in Article 4 of the Mississippi Constitution.

As of September 2014, Mississippi is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas.

See also: Mississippi House of Representatives, Mississippi State Senate, Mississippi Governor

Sessions

Article IV of the Mississippi Constitution establishes when the Legislature is to meet. Section 36 of Article IV states that the legislature is to convene in regular session on the Tuesday following the first Monday in January of each year. Section 36 limits the length of regular sessions to ninety calendar days, except for once every four years when the regular session can last up to one hundred twenty-five calendar days. The most recent one hundred twenty-five day session was in 2008, and the next session of this kind will be in 2012.

Section 36 also allows the Legislature to extend its sessions for thirty days by a two-thirds vote of both legislative houses. There is no limit on the number of times a session can be extended in this way. In 2010, the Legislature extended its session once, moving the date of adjournment from April 3rd to May 3rd.

Article V of the Mississippi Constitution gives the Governor of Mississippi the power to call the Legislature into extraordinary session. Section 121 of Article V enumerates this power.

2014

See also: Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions

In 2014, the Legislature was in session from January 7 through April 2.[1]

Major issues

Major issues in the 2014 legislative session included Common Core, Medicaid expansion, teachers' pay and prison sentences.[2][3][4]

2013

See also: Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions

In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 8 to April 7.[5]

Major issues

Major issues in the 2013 legislative session included creating a budget, charter schools and Medicaid expansion.[6]

2012

See also: Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions

In 2012, the Legislature was in session from January 3 through May 3.[7]

2011

In 2011, the Legislature was in session from January 4 through April 7.[8]

2010

In 2010, the Legislature was originally scheduled to be in session from January 5th to April 3rd. However, the session was extended to May 3rd. Additionally, a special session was held that convened on April 22nd and adjourned on April 23rd.[9]

Role in state budget

See also: Mississippi state budget

The state operates on an annual budget cycle. The sequence of key events in the budget process is as follows:[10][11]

  1. Budget instruction guidelines are sent to state agencies in June of the year preceding the start of the new fiscal year.
  2. State agencies submit their budget requests to the governor in August.
  3. Agency and public hearings are held in September and October.
  4. The governor submits his or her proposed budget to the state legislature in November (this deadline is extended to January for a newly-elected governor).
  5. The legislature typically adopts a budget in March or April. The fiscal year begins July 1.

In Mississippi, the governor may exercise line item veto or item veto of appropriations authority.[11]

The governor is legally required to submit a balanced budget proposal. Likewise, the legislature is legally required to pass a balanced budget.[11]

Cost-benefit analyses

See also: Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative Cost-Benefit Study
Map showing results of the Pew-MacArthur cost-benefit study.

The Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative released a report in July 2013 which indicated that cost-benefit analysis in policymaking led to more effective uses of public funds. Looking at data from 2008 through 2011, the study's authors found that some states were more likely to use cost-benefit analysis while others were facing challenges and lagging behind the rest of the nation. Among the challenges states faced were a lack of time, money and technical skills needed to conduct comprehensive cost-benefit analyses. Mississippi was one of 29 states with mixed results regarding the frequency and effectiveness in its use of cost-benefit analysis.[12]

Ethics and transparency

Following the Money report

See also: Following the Money 2014 Report

The U.S. Public Interest Research Group, a consumer-focused nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C., released its annual report on state transparency websites in April 2014. The report, entitled "Following the Money," measured how transparent and accountable state websites are with regard to state government spending.[13] According to the report, Mississippi received a grade of C+ and a numerical score of 79, indicating that Mississippi was "middling" in terms of transparency regarding state spending.[13]

Open States Transparency

See also: Open States' Legislative Data Report Card

The Sunlight Foundation released an "Open Legislative Data Report Card" in March 2013. Mississippi was given a grade of B in the report. The report card evaluated how adequate, complete and accessible legislative data is to the general public. A total of 10 states received an A -- Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Kansas, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Washington.[14]

Redistricting

See also: Redistricting in Mississippi

The five-member Standing Joint Reapportionment Committee handles redistricting, with no veto power afforded to the Governor. Should it fail to finalize a plan on time, a backup commission -- composed of the Chief Justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court, the Attorney General, the Secretary of State, and the Majority Leaders of both legislative chambers -- would take over the process. Mississippi was required to have its maps pre-cleared by the Justice Department under the Voting Rights Act until 2013, when the Supreme Court struck down the section laying out the formula for determining pre-clearance states.[15]

2010 census

Mississippi received its local census data on February 3, 2011. The state's population grew 4.3 percent, with several of its well-known cities (Jackson, Gulfport, Biloxi) losing as much as 13 percent. Most of the state's population loss was in the north-central region and along the western edge.

Republicans controlled the Legislature and governorship at the time of redistricting. Because Mississippi holds legislative elections in odd-numbered years, the legislature was given a tight deadline -- June 1, 2011 -- for redistricting in time for the 2011 elections while allowing 60 days of review by the DOJ. The deadline passed without a plan, meaning any new maps would not take effect until 2015. Elections were held with the previous maps, and the House passed a new map in April 2012, with the Senate following in May.[16] The House plan included five two-incumbent races.

Legislators

Salaries

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries

As of 2013, members of the Mississippi legislature are paid $10,000/year. Per diem is $109/day tied to the federal rate.[17]

When sworn in

See also: When state legislators assume office after a general election

Mississippi legislators assume office the first day of the regular session of the year following election. The Constitution requires the Legislature to convene yearly on the Tuesday after the first Monday in January.

Senate

The Mississippi Senate is the upper house of the Mississippi Legislature. The Senate is composed of 52 Senators representing an equal amount of constituent districts. Each member represents an average of 57,063 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[18] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 54,705.[19] Senators serve four-year terms with no term limits.

Like other upper houses of state and territorial legislatures and the federal U.S. Senate, the Senate can confirm or reject gubernatorial appointments to the state cabinet, commissions and boards.

According to the current Mississippi Constitution, the Senate is to be composed of no more than 52 members elected for four-year terms. Elections to the Senate are held on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November during the state general elections.


Party As of September 2014
     Democratic Party 20
     Republican Party 31
     Vacancy 1
Total 52


The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Mississippi State Senate from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the Mississippi State Senate.PNG

House of Representatives

The House of Representatives is the lower house of the Mississippi State Legislature. According to the state constitution of 1890, this body is to comprise no more than 122 members elected for four-year terms (Section 34). To qualify as a member of the house candidates must (a) be at least 21 years old, (b) have been a resident of Mississippi for at least four years, and (c) have resided in the district in which he/she is running for at least two years (Sections 41, 44 and 45). Current state law provides for the maximum number of members. Elections are held the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.

Each member represents an average of 24,322 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[20] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 23,317.[21]

The Constitution also specifies that the legislature shall meet for 125 days every four years and 90 days in all other years (Section 36 of Article 4).


Party As of September 2014
     Democratic Party 58
     Republican Party 64
Total 122


The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Mississippi State House of Representatives from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the Mississippi State House.PNG

History

Partisan balance 1992-2013

Who Runs the States Project
See also: Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States and Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States, Mississippi
Partisan breakdown of the Mississippi legislature from 1992-2013

Mississippi State Senate: From 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the Mississippi State Senate for 18 years while the Republicans were the majority for four years. The Mississippi State Senate is 1 of 16 state senates that was Democratic for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. The final three years of the study depicted a shift in the Mississippi senate to the Republican party with the last two years being Republican trifectas.

Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.

Mississippi House of Representatives: From 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the Mississippi House of Representatives for the first 20 years while the Republicans were the majority for the last two years. The Mississippi State House of Representatives is one of 18 state Houses that was Democratic for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. The final three years of the study depicted a shift not only in the Mississippi House but in the entire state government to the Republican party with the last two years being Republican trifectas.

Across the country, there were 577 Democratic and 483 Republican State Houses of Representatives from 1992 to 2013.

Over the course of the 22-year study, state governments became increasingly more partisan. At the outset of the study period (1992), 18 of the 49 states with partisan legislatures had single-party trifectas and 31 states had divided governments. In 2013, only 13 states had divided governments, while single-party trifectas held sway in 36 states, the most in the 22 years studied.

The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Office of the Governor of Mississippi, the Mississippi State Senate and the Mississippi House of Representatives from 1992-2013. Partisan composition of Mississippi state government(1992-2013).PNG

SQLI and partisanship

The chart below depicts the partisanship of the Mississippi state government and the state's SQLI ranking for the years studied. For the SQLI, the states were ranked from 1-50, with 1 being the best and 50 the worst. Mississippi has consistently ranked in the bottom-2 of the SQLI ranking regardless of a trifecta or a divided government. The state has been ranked in the last place for fifteen separate years and ranked 49th six separate years. Mississippi had two trifecta, both Democratic and Republican, between 2000 and 2004 and in 2012, respectively.

  • SQLI average with Democratic trifecta: 49.75
  • SQLI average with Republican trifecta: 50
  • SQLI average with divided government: 49.69
Chart displaying the partisanship of Mississippi government from 1992-2013 and the State Quality of Life Index (SQLI).

Joint legislative committees

External links

Light Bulb Icon.svg.png
Suggest a link

References

  1. StateScape, "Session Schedules," accessed July 29, 2014
  2. WDAM, "Mississippi legislature begins 2014 session," January 7, 2014
  3. GulfLive.com, "13 things to watch in the 2014 Mississippi Legislature," January 3, 2014. Accessed January 11, 2014
  4. The Associated Press, "Mississippi lawmakers face demands from citizens even as they seek to hold down spending," January 7, 2014
  5. StateScape, "Session Schedules," accessed July 29, 2014
  6. Sun Herald, "Mississippi legislative session sets off at saunter, not trot," January 8, 2013
  7. StateScape, "Session Schedules," accessed July 29, 2014 (Archived)
  8. Mississippi State Legislature, "2011 Daily Action Reports," accessed July 29, 2014
  9. National Conference of State Legislatures, "2010 Legislative Session Calendar," accessed March 24, 2014 (Archived)
  10. National Conference of State Legislatures, "State Experiences with Annual and Biennial Budgeting," updated April 2011
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 National Association of State Budget Officers, "Budget Processes in the States, Summer 2008," accessed February 21, 2014
  12. Pew Charitable Trusts, "States’ Use of Cost-Benefit Analysis," July 29, 2013
  13. 13.0 13.1 U.S. Public Interest Research Group, "Following the Money 2014 Report," accessed April 15, 2014
  14. Sunlight Foundation, "Ten Principles for Opening Up Government Information," accessed June 16, 2013
  15. The Huffington Post, "Voting Rights Act Section 4 Struck Down By Supreme Court," June 25, 2013. Retrieved February 1, 2014
  16. The Associated Press, "Mississippi House adopts Senate redistricting plan," May 3, 2012
  17. NCSL.org, "2012 State Legislator Compensation and Per Diem Table," accessed March 18, 2013
  18. U.S. Census Bureau, "Population Distribution and Change: 2000 to 2010," April 2011
  19. U.S. Census Bureau, "States Ranked by Population," April 2, 2001
  20. U.S. Census Bureau, "Population Distribution and Change: 2000 to 2010," April 2011
  21. U.S. Census Bureau, "States Ranked by Population," April 2, 2001