Missouri election officials certify 2 of 4 initiative petitions for November ballot

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August 3, 2010


Puppy Mill Cruelty Prevention Ballot Petition, 5/2/10

SPRINGFIELD, Missouri: Supporters of an Earnings Tax Initiative and an initiative to clamp down on dog breeding operations breathed a sigh of relief in Missouri today when the Office of the Missouri Secretary of State announced that both measures will appear on the November 2 ballot in the state.

Supporters of two other measures had submitted petition signatures by the state's early May deadline for their measures, and at least one group of initiative backers is thinking more in terms of suing than of smiling.

The Missouri Association of Realtors has already announced that it is likely to file a lawsuit against the Office of the Missouri Secretary of State, led by U.S. Senatorial candidate Robin Carnahan, contesting the determination that they did not collect sufficient signatures to qualify the Missouri Real Estate Taxation Amendment for the November 2, 2010 ballot.[1]

Disappointed supporters of the Missouri Judicial Selection Amendment had not announced by mid-afternoon on August 3 how they intended to proceed.

Missouri is one of a handful of states where a distribution requirement based on U.S. Congressional districts is in force.

According to the Missouri Watchdog:

"For a petition seeking to change a Missouri statute, valid signatures from registered voters must equal 5 percent of the total votes cast in the 2008 governor’s election from six of the state’s nine congressional districts. The number of signatures needed ranges between 91,818 and 99,600.
For a petition seeking to change the Missouri Constitution, valid signatures must equal 8 percent of the total votes cast in the 2008 governor’s election from six of the state’s nine congressional districts. The number of signatures required ranges between 146,907 and 159,359."[2]

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