Difference between revisions of "Montana Marijuana Ban Initiative (2014)"

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::''See also: [[Laws governing the initiative process in Montana]]''
 
::''See also: [[Laws governing the initiative process in Montana]]''
  
To gain ballot access for the [[2014 ballot measures|November 2014 ballot]], supporters need to collect valid signatures from ten percent of the total number of votes cast in the last gubernatorial general election, including ten percent of the voters in each of the forty legislative house districts. In total, supporters need to collect [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Montana#Number_required|24,174 valid signatures]]. Those signatures need to be submitted by the [[Petition drive deadlines, 2014|petition drive deadline]] on [[BC2014#June|June 20, 2014]].
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To gain ballot access for the [[2014 ballot measures|November 2014 ballot]], supporters were required to collect valid signatures from ten percent of the total number of votes cast in the last gubernatorial general election, including ten percent of the voters in each of the forty legislative house districts. In total, supporters needed to collect [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Montana#Number_required|24,174 valid signatures]]. Those signatures needed to be submitted by the [[Petition drive deadlines, 2014|petition drive deadline]] on [[BC2014#June|June 20, 2014]].
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==

Revision as of 09:27, 20 June 2014

Voting on Marijuana
Marijuana Leaf-smaller.gif
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
The Montana Marijuana Ban, Initiative 174 may appear on the November 4, 2014 ballot in Montana as an initiated state statute. The measure, upon voter approval, would require that drugs illegal under federal law be considered illegal under state law, with the specific intent of supporters to ban marijuana.[1][2]

Since marijuana is listed on Schedule 1 of the Federal Controlled Substances Act, marijuana would be considered illegal in state law upon the initiative’s approval by voters.[2]

The initiative was proposed by Steve Zabawa, the owner of a car dealership in Billings.[2]

Text of measure

The proposed ballot question would read as follows:[3]

I-174 establishes that drugs listed on Schedule I of the federal Controlled Substances Act now or in the future would be illegal under Montana state law. A drug on Schedule I of the federal Controlled Substances Act would generally be illegal for all purposes unless otherwise authorized by law. I-174 also repeals the Montana Marijuana Act. If approved by the electorate in the general election, the new law would be immediately effective.

I-174 has a net zero impact to the state general fund.
[ ] YES on Constitutional Initiative I-174.
[ ] NO on Constitutional Initiative I-174.[4]

Support

Arguments

Steve Zabawa, the measure's sponsor, argued that marijuana should be considered illegal until the drug is legal throughout the country. He argued the following:[2]

  • "If it’s an illegal drug by the federal government, it should be illegal in Montana. The federal government trumps the state, so why do we want to put our citizens in jeopardy."
  • "When the FDA (Federal Food and Drug Administration) says it’s safe, then it can be sold through our pharmacies with doctors who are trained on the legal drug to prescribe the right dosage amount for the right amount of time. This protects all Montanans."

Opposition

Arguments

  • Chris Lindsey of Montana NORML and the Marijuana Policy Project stated, “Marijuana prohibition has been just as ineffective, inefficient and problematic as alcohol prohibition. It’s a colossal failure. And Steve apparently wants to be the champion of that failure. Marijuana is clearly safer than alcohol. If he wants to protect anybody, he should try to ban alcohol.”[2]

Path to the ballot

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Montana

To gain ballot access for the November 2014 ballot, supporters were required to collect valid signatures from ten percent of the total number of votes cast in the last gubernatorial general election, including ten percent of the voters in each of the forty legislative house districts. In total, supporters needed to collect 24,174 valid signatures. Those signatures needed to be submitted by the petition drive deadline on June 20, 2014.

See also

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Suggest a link

References