Difference between revisions of "Montana Primary Election Revision Measure, LR-127 (2014)"

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The measure was passed in the legislature primarily along party lines with Democrats being in opposition.<ref name="firststory"/>
 
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===Opponents===
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* Montana Education Association-Montana Federation of Teachers<ref name=askstrike>[http://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/groups-ask-montana-court-to-strike-referendums-from-ballot/article_cc429b10-6906-11e3-8635-001a4bcf887a.html ''Missoulian'', "Groups ask Montana court to strike referendums from ballot", December 19, 2013]</ref>
  
 
===Arguments===
 
===Arguments===

Revision as of 16:22, 9 January 2014


Primary Election Revision Measure
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Type:State statute
Referred by:Montana State Legislature
Topic:Elections
Status:On the ballot
The Montana Primary Election Revision Measure, also known as SB 408, is a legislatively-referred state statute on the ballot in Montana that will be decided in the general election on November 4, 2014. The measure would establish a "top-two" primary election system.[1]

Support

Senator Alan Olson (R-23) sponsored the measure in the legislature. The measure was passed by the legislature mostly along party lines with overwhelming support coming from Republican members.[2]

Arguments

  • Sen. Olson said that the measure would ensure that the majority is represented in the legislature. He cited his own election as an example of what the measure would address, saying, "I won my seat with 42 percent of the vote. So that means that 58 percent of the people who voted didn’t vote for me. I kind of wonder sometimes if that’s fair."[2]
  • Supporters argue that the top-two primary system would encourage more more people to vote in primary elections because voters would be allowed to vote for anyone in primary elections regardless of whether or not they were registered with a political party. They also argue that this would encourage more moderate candidates because they would have to appeal to independent voters in order to win in the primaries.[2]

Opposition

The measure was passed in the legislature primarily along party lines with Democrats being in opposition.[2]

Opponents

  • Montana Education Association-Montana Federation of Teachers[3]

Arguments

  • Opponents argue that the system would put an end to third parties because they are highly unlikely to be among the top two candidates in the primary. They also argue that parties will not be able to have large primaries and instead will be forced to nominate whoever is the one best candidate to move forward.[2]

Path to the ballot

A simple majority is required in both chambers to pass a legislatively-referred state statute onto the ballot.

The House 58-42 in approval of the measure on April 17.[1]

The Senate passed the measure on to the ballot with a vote of 29-20 on April 19, 2013.[1]

See also

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External links

References