Difference between revisions of "Montana State Senate"

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Elections for the office of Montana State Senate were held in Montana on [[State legislative elections, 2010|November 2, 2010]].  A total of '''26 seats''' were up for election.
 
Elections for the office of Montana State Senate were held in Montana on [[State legislative elections, 2010|November 2, 2010]].  A total of '''26 seats''' were up for election.
  
The [[Primary election dates in 2010|signature-filing deadline]] for candidates wishing to run in these elections was March 15, 2010. The primary election day was June 8, 2010.
+
The [[Primary election dates in 2010|signature-filing deadline]] for candidates wishing to run in these elections was March 15, 2010. The primary Election Day was June 8, 2010.
  
 
During the 2010 eleciton, the total value of contributions to Senate candidates was $993,331.  The top 10 donors were:<ref>[http://www.followthemoney.org/database/StateGlance/state_candidates.phtml?s=MT&y=2010&f=S ''Follow the Money'', "Montana 2010 - Candidates," accessed June 2, 2014]</ref>
 
During the 2010 eleciton, the total value of contributions to Senate candidates was $993,331.  The top 10 donors were:<ref>[http://www.followthemoney.org/database/StateGlance/state_candidates.phtml?s=MT&y=2010&f=S ''Follow the Money'', "Montana 2010 - Candidates," accessed June 2, 2014]</ref>

Revision as of 08:57, 7 July 2014

Montana State Senate

Seal of Montana.jpg
General Information
Type:   Upper house
Term limits:   2 terms (8 years)
2014 session start:   Will not hold a regular session.
Website:   Official Senate Page
Leadership
Senate President:   Jeff Essmann (R)
Majority Leader:   Art Wittich (R)
Minority leader:   Jon Sesso (D)
Structure
Members:  50
  
Length of term:   4 years
Authority:   Art V, Sec. 2, Montana Constitution
Salary:   $82.64/day + per diem
Elections
Last Election:  November 6, 2012 (26 seats)
Next election:  November 4, 2014
Redistricting:   Montana Districting and Apportionment Commission
Meeting place:
Montanastatecapitol.jpg
The Montana Senate is the upper house of the Montana State Legislature. It consists of 50 senators representing districts with an average of 19,788 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[1] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 18,044 residents.[2]

Jim Peterson, a Republican, is the Montana Senate's president.

Montana state senators serve for four-year terms subject to a term limit of no more than two terms in office. Twenty-five of the state senate seats are up for election each even-numbered year.[3]

There are 17 standing Senate committees which consider legislation on specific areas.

As of December 2014, Montana is one of 14 states that is under divided government and is therefore not one of the state government trifectas.

See also: Montana State Legislature, Montana House of Representatives, Montana Governor

Sessions

Article V of the Montana Constitution establishes when the Montana State Legislature, of which the Senate is a part, is to be in session. Section 6 of Article V states that the Legislature is to meet in every odd-numbered year in a regular session of at most ninety legislative days. However, Section 6 allows any Legislature to increase the limit on the length of any subsequent session. Section 6 also allows for the Legislature to meet in special session when convened by the Governor of Montana or when a special session is requested by a majority of the Legislature's members.

2014

See also: Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions

In 2014, the Legislature will not hold a regular session.

2013

See also: Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions

In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 7 through April 27.

Major issues

Major issues in the 2013 legislative session included economic development, increased natural resource development and reforms to how the state funds education.[4]

2012

See also: Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions

In 2012, the Senate was not in regular session.

2011

In 2011, the Senate was in session from January 3 through April 28.[5]

2010

In 2010, the Senate was not in session.[6]

2009

The 61st session of the Montana legislature convened on January 5, 2009 and adjourned on April 25, 2009.

Role in state budget

See also: Montana state budget

The state operates on an annual budget cycle. The sequence of key events in the budget process is as follows:[7][8]

  1. Budget instruction guidelines are sent to state agencies in early August of the year preceding the start of the new biennium.
  2. Agencies submit their budget requests to the governor in early September.
  3. Agency hearings are held in September.
  4. The governor submits his or her proposed budget to the state legislature in November.
  5. The legislature typically adopts a budget in April. A simple majority is required to pass a budget. The biennium begins July 1.

Montana is one of 44 states in which the governor has line item veto authority.[8]

The governor is legally required to submit a balanced budget proposal. Likewise, the legislature is legally required to pass a balanced budget.[8]

Cost-benefit analyses

See also: Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative Cost-Benefit Study
Map showing results of the Pew-MacArthur cost-benefit study.

The Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative released a report in July 2013 which indicated that cost-benefit analysis in policymaking led to more effective uses of public funds. Looking at data from 2008 through 2011, the study's authors found that some states were more likely to use cost-benefit analysis while others were facing challenges and lagging behind the rest of the nation. Among the challenges states faced were a lack of time, money and technical skills needed to conduct comprehensive cost-benefit analyses. Montana was one of 11 states that made rare use of cost-benefit analyses in policy and budget processes.[9]

Ethics and transparency

Following the Money report

See also: Following the Money 2014 Report

The U.S. Public Interest Research Group, a consumer-focused nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C., released its annual report on state transparency websites in April 2014. The report, entitled "Following the Money," measured how transparent and accountable state websites are with regard to state government spending.[10] According to the report, Montana received a grade of B and a numerical score of 86, indicating that Montana was "advancing" in terms of transparency regarding state spending.[10]

Open States Transparency

See also: Open States' Legislative Data Report Card

The Sunlight Foundation released an "Open Legislative Data Report Card" in March 2013. Montana was given a grade of C in the report. The report card evaluated how adequate, complete and accessible legislative data is to the general public. A total of 10 states received an A -- Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Kansas, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Washington.[11]

Elections

2014

See also: Montana State Senate elections, 2014

Elections for the office of Montana State Senate took place in 2014. A primary election took place on June 3, 2014, and a general election took place on November 4, 2014. The signature-filing deadline for major party candidates wishing to run in this election was March 10, 2014; minor party and independent candidates had until June 2, 2014, to file.

2012

See also: Montana State Senate elections, 2012

Elections for the office of Montana State Senate were held in Montana on November 6, 2012. A total of 25 seats were up for election. The signature filing deadline was March 12, 2012 and the primary date was June 5 2012.

Montana state senators are subject to term limits, and may not serve more than two four-year terms. In 2012, 8 state senators were termed-out.

The following table details the 10 districts with the smallest margin of victory in the November 6 general election.

During the 2012 election, the total value of contributions to Senate candidates was $907,978. The top 10 contributors were:[12]

2012 Donors, Montana State Senate
Donor Amount
Webb, Roger $34,185
Roberts, Rollan II $32,626
Taylor, Janna $26,160
Stuart, Douglas $20,408
Mowbray, Carmine $8,256
Arnold, Jonathan L. $7,241
Long, Malcolm D. (Mack) $5,412
Mowbray, Carmine M. $4,816
Gernant, Tyler $4,640
Yellowstone County Democratic Central Committee $3,900

2010

See also: Montana State Senate elections, 2010

Elections for the office of Montana State Senate were held in Montana on November 2, 2010. A total of 26 seats were up for election.

The signature-filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in these elections was March 15, 2010. The primary Election Day was June 8, 2010.

During the 2010 eleciton, the total value of contributions to Senate candidates was $993,331. The top 10 donors were:[13]

2008

See also: Montana State Senate elections, 2008

Elections for the office of Montana State Senate consisted of a primary election on June 3, 2008, and a general election on November 4, 2008. Twenty-five seats were up for election.

During the 2008 election, the total value of contributions to Senate candidates was $744,742. The top 10 contributors were:[14]

2008 Donors, Montana State Senate
Donor Amount
Zinke, Ryan K. $15,491
Windy Boy, Jonathan $6,986
Brenden, John C. $6,240
Hartelius, Channing J. $6,171
Brown, Taylor $5,700
Sands, Jack E. $5,500
Brooks, Suzanne $4,911
Jordan, Gilbert $4,125
ActBlue Montana $3,512
Yellowstone County Republican Central Committee $3,300

2006

See also: Montana State Senate elections, 2006

Elections for the office of Montana State Senate consisted of a primary election on June 6, 2006, and a general election on November 7, 2006. Twenty-five seats were up for election.

During the 2006 election, the total value of contributions to Senate candidates was $687,206. The top 10 contributors were:[15]

2006 Donors, Montana State Senate
Donor Amount
Essmann, Jeff $24,260
Noennig, Mark E. $20,000
Wittich, Art $11,500
Smith, Ric $6,500
Loranger, Donald E. $5,870
Woerner, Dr. Don $5,423
Yellowstone County Republican Central Committee $3,750
Murphy, Terry $3,205
McDonald, Clay Scott $3,148
Murphy, Terry $3,000

2004

See also: Montana State Senate elections, 2004

Elections for the office of Montana State Senate consisted of a primary election on June 3, 2004, and a general election on November 2, 2004. Twenty-five seats were up for election.

During the 2004 election, the total value of contributions to Senate candidates was $600,450. The top 10 contributors were:[16]

2004 Donors, Montana State Senate
Donor Amount
Weinberg, Dan $36,538
Lind, Greg H. $18,122
Harmon, Dean $16,550
Larsen, Cliff $9,730
O'Neil, Jerry $8,730
Haines, Dick $4,890
Cyr, Larry Jr. $4,750
Yellowstone County Republican Central Committee $3,800
Navratil, Gerald J. $3,475
Ryan, Don $2,867

2002

See also: Montana State Senate elections, 2002

Elections for the office of Montana State Senate consisted of a primary election on June 6, 2002, and a general election on November 7, 2002. Twenty-five seats were up for election.

During the 2002 election, the total value of contributions to Senate candidates was $521,540. The top 10 contributors were:[17]

2002 Donors, Montana State Senate
Donor Amount
Fox, Mary Jo $52,654
Perry, Gary L. $25,515
Gibson, Harriet (Hattie) $13,200
Anderson, Sherm $12,000
Nordtvedt, Ken $7,303
Hansen, Ken $7,000
Lee, Katherine $4,427
Sadler, James $4,000
Solomon, Ted $3,115
Kleinjan, Art $3,000

2000

See also: Montana State Senate elections, 2000

Elections for the office of Montana State Senate consisted of a primary election on June 6, 2000, and a general election on November 7, 2000. Twenty-six seats were up for election.

During the 2000 election, the total value of contributions to Senate candidates was $395,126. The top 10 contributors were:[18]

2000 Donors, Montana State Senate
Donor Amount
Kitzenberg, Sam $14,100
Butcher, Edward B. $10,800
Cobb, John $8,531
Glaser, William E. $7,474
Hanson, Harold $6,500
Stapleton, Corey $4,435
Montana Education Association Montana Federation Of Teachers $3,800
Stroebe, Teresa $3,440
O'Neil, Jerry $3,255
Sweet, Cal $2,793

Qualifications

To be eligible to serve in the Montana State Senate, a candidate must be:[19]

  • A resident of the state for at least one year next preceding the general election
  • A resident of the county for six months preceding the general election if it contains one or more districts or of the district if it contains all or parts of more than one county.

Vacancies

See also: How vacancies are filled in state legislatures
How Vacancies are filled in State Legislatures
NevadaMassachusettsColoradoNew MexicoWyomingArizonaMontanaCaliforniaOregonWashingtonIdahoTexasOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaMinnesotaIowaMissouriArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaGeorgiaFloridaSouth CarolinaIllinoisWisconsinTennesseeNorth CarolinaIndianaOhioKentuckyPennsylvaniaNew JerseyNew YorkVermontVermontNew HampshireMaineWest VirginiaVirginiaMarylandMarylandConnecticutConnecticutDelawareDelawareRhode IslandRhode IslandMassachusettsNew HampshireMichiganMichiganAlaskaVacancy fulfillment map.png

If there is a vacancy in the Senate, the Board of County Commissioners that represent the vacant seat must select a replacement. The Secretary of State must notify the Board of Commissioners and the county central committee of the political party that holds the vacant seat no later than seven days after the vacancy happened. The county central committee has 45 days after receiving notice from the Secretary of State to provide a list of candidates to the Board of County Commissioners. The board must select a replacement no later than 15 days after receiving the list of candidates. If the Senate is in session, the selection must be made no later than five days after receiving a candidate list.[20] Any person selected to fill a Senate seat serves until the next scheduled general election.[21]

Term limits

See also: State legislatures with term limits

The Montana legislature is one of 15 state legislatures with term limits. Voters enacted the Montana Term Limits Act in 1992. That initiative said that Missouri senators are subject to term limits of no more than two four-year terms, or a total of eight years.

The first year that the term limits enacted in 1992 impacted the ability of incumbents to run for office was in 2000.[3]

Senators

Salaries

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries

As of 2013, members of the Montana legislature are paid $82.64/day. Per diem is $105.31/day.[22]

Partisan composition

See also: Partisan composition of state senates
Party As of December 2014
     Democratic Party 21
     Republican Party 29
Total 50


The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Montana State Senate from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the Montana State Senate.PNG

Leadership

At the beginning of each regular legislative session the Senate elects the President and President pro tempore. It then chooses its other officers.[23][24]

Current leadership

Current Leadership, Montana State Senate
Office Representative Party
President of the Senate Jeff Essmann Ends.png Republican
State Senate President Pro Tempore Debby Barrett Ends.png Republican
State Senate Majority Leader Art Wittich Ends.png Republican
State Senate Majority Whip Eric Moore Ends.png Republican
State Senate Majority Whip Janna Taylor Ends.png Republican
State Senate Majority Whip Llew Jones Ends.png Republican
State Senate Minority Leader Jon Sesso Electiondot.png Democratic
State Senate Minority Whip Robyn Driscoll Electiondot.png Democratic
State Senate Minority Whip Cliff Larsen Electiondot.png Democratic

List of current members

Members of the 2009 Montana Senate, Photo by George Lane from the Montana Senate website
Current members, Montana State Senate
District Representative Party Assumed office
1 Chas Vincent Ends.png Republican 2011
2 Dee Brown Ends.png Republican 2013
3 Bruce Tutvedt Ends.png Republican 2009
4 Jon Sonju Ends.png Republican 2011
5 Verdell Jackson Ends.png Republican 2007
6 Janna Taylor Ends.png Republican 2013
7 Jennifer Fielder Ends.png Republican 2013
8 Shannon Augare Electiondot.png Democratic 2011
9 Rick Ripley Ends.png Republican 2009
10 Brad Hamlett Electiondot.png Democratic 2009
11 Anders Blewett Electiondot.png Democratic 2011
12 Mitch Tropila Electiondot.png Democratic 2007
13 Edward Buttrey Ends.png Republican 2011
14 Llew Jones Ends.png Republican 2011
15 Jim Peterson Ends.png Republican 2007
16 Jonathan Windy Boy Electiondot.png Democratic 2009
17 Greg Jergeson Electiondot.png Democratic 2013
18 John Brenden Ends.png Republican 2009
19 Matthew Rosendale Ends.png Republican 2013
20 Frederick "Eric" Moore Ends.png Republican 2011
21 Sharon Stewart-Peregoy Electiondot.png Democratic 2009
22 Taylor Brown Ends.png Republican 2009
23 Alan Olson Ends.png Republican 2011
24 Roger Webb Ends.png Republican 2013
25 Kendall Van Dyk Electiondot.png Democratic 2011
26 Robyn Driscoll Electiondot.png Democratic 2013
27 Elsie Arntzen Ends.png Republican 2013
28 Jeff Essmann Ends.png Republican 2005
29 Edward Walker Ends.png Republican 2011
30 Jason Priest Ends.png Republican 2011
31 Ron Arthun Ends.png Republican 2011
32 Larry Jent Electiondot.png Democratic 2007
33 Mike Phillips Electiondot.png Democratic 2013
34 Scott Sales Ends.png Republican 2013
35 Art Wittich Ends.png Republican 2011
36 Debby Barrett Ends.png Republican 2009
37 Jon Sesso Electiondot.png Democratic 2013
38 Jim Keane Electiondot.png Democratic 2009
39 Terry Murphy Ends.png Republican 2007
40 Mary Caferro Electiondot.png Democratic 2011
41 Christine Kaufmann Electiondot.png Democratic 2007
42 Dave Lewis Ends.png Republican 2005
43 Gene Vuckovich Electiondot.png Democratic 2011
44 Scott Boulanger Ends.png Republican 2013
45 Fred Thomas Ends.png Republican 2013
46 Sue Malek Electiondot.png Democratic 2013
47 Dick Barrett Electiondot.png Democratic 2013
48 Tom Facey Electiondot.png Democratic 2011
49 David Wanzenried Electiondot.png Democratic 2007
50 Cliff Larsen Electiondot.png Democratic 2009

Standing Senate Committees

See also: Joint legislative committees, Montana State Legislature

The Montana State Senate has 17 standing committees:

History

Partisan balance 1992-2013

Who Runs the States Project
See also: Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States and Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States, Montana
Partisan breakdown of the Montana legislature from 1992-2013

From 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the Montana State Senate for seven years while the Republicans were the majority for 15 years, including the last five years.

Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.

Over the course of the 22-year study, state governments became increasingly more partisan. At the outset of the study period (1992), 18 of the 49 states with partisan legislatures had single-party trifectas and 31 states had divided governments. In 2013, only 13 states had divided governments, while single-party trifectas held sway in 36 states, the most in the 22 years studied.

The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Office of the Governor of Montana, the Montana State Senate and the Montana House of Representatives from 1992-2013. Partisan composition of Montana state government(1992-2013).PNG

SQLI and partisanship

The chart below depicts the partisanship of the Montana state government and the state's SQLI ranking for the years studied. For the SQLI, the states were ranked from 1-50, with 1 being the best and 50 the worst. Montana had Republican trifectas from 1995-2004. Montana's lowest SQLI ranking, finishing at 41st, occurred during those Republican trifectas, from 1999-2001. The state's two highest rankings came in the final five years while under divided government.

Chart displaying the partisanship of Montana government from 1992-2013 and the State Quality of Life Index (SQLI).

External links

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Suggest a link

References

  1. U.S. Census Bureau, "Population Distribution and Change: 2000 to 2010," April 2011
  2. U.S. Census Bureau, "States Ranked by Population," April 2, 2001
  3. 3.0 3.1 termlimits.org, "State Legislative Term Limits," accessed December 17, 2013
  4. Billings Gazette, "Legislature again prepare to debate divisive issues," January 6, 2013
  5. Montana Legislature, "2011 Regular Session," accessed June 2, 2014
  6. Montana Legislature, "Past Sessions," accessed June 2, 2014
  7. National Conference of State Legislatures, "State Experiences with Annual and Biennial Budgeting," accessed June 2, 2014
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 National Association of State Budget Officers, "Budget Processes in the States, Summer 2008," accessed February 21, 2014
  9. Pew Charitable Trusts, "States’ Use of Cost-Benefit Analysis," July 29, 2013
  10. 10.0 10.1 U.S. Public Interest Research Group, "Following the Money 2014 Report," accessed April 15, 2014
  11. Sunlight Foundation, "Ten Principles for Opening Up Government Information," accessed June 16, 2013
  12. Follow the Money, "Montana 2012 - Candidates," accessed June 2, 2014
  13. Follow the Money, "Montana 2010 - Candidates," accessed June 2, 2014
  14. Follow the Money, "Montana 2008 - Candidates," accessed June 2, 2014
  15. Follow the Money, "Montana 2006 - Candidates," accessed June 2, 2014
  16. Follow the Money, "Montana 2004 - Candidates," accessed June 2, 2014
  17. Follow the Money, "Montana 2002 - Candidates," accessed June 2, 2014
  18. Follow the Money, "Montana 2000 - Candidates," accessed June 2, 2014
  19. Montana Legislative Services, "Constitution of Montana," accessed March 6, 2014 (Referenced Art. V, Sec. 4)
  20. Montana Legislature, "Montana Election Law," accessed June 2, 2014 (Referenced Statute 5-2-402 (3) (a)-(c))
  21. Montana Legislature, "Montana Election Law," accessed June 2, 2014 (Referenced Statute 5-2-405 (1)-(2))
  22. NCSL.org, "2012 State Legislator Compensation and Per Diem Table," accessed March 18, 2013
  23. Montana Legislature, "Senate Rules," accessed June 2, 2014
  24. Montana Legislature, "Senate, 2013," accessed June 2, 2014