Nebraska Accountability and Disclosure Commission

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The Nebraska Accountability and Disclosure Commission is a independent campaign finance disciplinary agency that is responsible for governing Nebraska's campaign finance laws.

History

The Nebraska Accountability and Disclosure Commission was first formed in 1977 on an act of the Nebraska Legislature[1].

Governance

The Accountability and Disclosure Commission is governed by a nine person board consisting of eight appointed members and an elected official[2].

Selection of members

The Nebraska Accountability and Disclosure Commission consists of the Nebraska Secretary of State which is a voting member and eight other members that are selected. The Secretary of State is responsible for nominating four persons to commission along with four from the Governor of Nebraska. The Governor has two at-large selections from his or her own choosing and two members selected on recommendation from the Nebraska Legislature from a list that the Legislature provides to the Governor.

The Secretary of State has two at-large picks from his or her own choosing and two other picks submitted upon recommendation from the leadership of the state party organizations in Nebraska. No more three commissioners can be from one congressional district, and no more than four can be from the same party. Each member is selected which is contingent on the advise and consent of the Legislature which confirms all members. Each member upon confirmation serves a staggered six year term[3].

Campaign finance discipline

The Accountability and Disclosure Commission is responsible for prosecuting all civil violations of Nebraska's campaign finance laws. The first step in filing a campaign finance complaint is to file with the NADC[4]. It is up to the NADC to fully investigate the complaint and to determine probable cause before proceeding with any action[4]. A probable cause hearing is done to determine if someone is found in violation of the law[4]. If a hearing finds someone guilty of violating the state's campaign finance laws, the commission mostly levies a civil fine. All criminal cases are handled by the Nebraska Attorney General[5].

See also

External links

References