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Nebraska State Senator Salary Increase Act, 2010

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The Nebraska State Senator Salary Increase Act will not be on the May 11, 2010 primary ballot in the state of Nebraska as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. The measure was referred to the ballot and would have asked voters whether or not the state should raise salaries for state senators. By the opinion of the Nebraska Attorney General, and by the actions of the Nebraska Secretary of State John A. Gale, the measure was later removed from the ballot.[1][2]

The measure would have also impacted the state and citizens by:

  • Increasing State Senators’ salaries from the current $12,000 to $21,000 per year.
  • Including an annual adjustment based on the change in the consumer priceindex, but could not increase more than 4% each year.

Constitutional changes

The measure would have amended Article 3, Section 7 of the Nebraska Constitution. It would have added:[2]

Until January 5, 2011, each member of the Legislature shall receive a salary of not to exceed one thousand dollars per month during the term of his or her office. Beginning January 5, 2011, each member of the Legislature shall receive an annual salary during his or her term of office equal to twenty-two thousand dollars.

This part of Article 3, Section 7 currently reads:

Each member of the Legislature shall receive a salary of not to exceed one thousand dollars per month during the term of his or her office.

Path to the ballot

60% of the members of the Nebraska State Legislature must vote for a proposed amendment to be placed on the ballot. Nebraska is one of nine states that allows a referred amendment to go on the ballot after a 60% supermajority vote in one session.

Support

2006 ballot measure

In 2006, the Vote Yes on Amendment 1 campaign listed many supporters for a similar Nebraska amendment on an online brochure, stating "Tens of thousands of Nebraskans have already shown their support for this important ballot issue." The measure appeared on the Nebraska primary election ballot in May 2006.

The campaign gave arguments for the measure, comparing the salaries of Nebraska Senators to those in surrounding states. They also cited that the senators' salaries of $12,000 "breaks down to a little more than minimum wage."[3]

See also

External links

References