Nevada Casino Tax Amendment (2012)

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A Nevada Casino Tax Amendment did not make the November 2012 state ballot in Nevada as an initiated constitutional amendment. The measure would raise gambling taxes in the state. Specifically, it would raise the top tier of gambling taxes from 6.75 percent to 9 percent for casinos that make more than $250,000 a month. Currently, the tax applies to casinos with monthly revenues of $134,000 or more. The measure was filed by Nevadans for a Fair 9 Percent Gambling Revenue Tax.[1]

During April 2012, Las Vegas businessman Monte Miller, leader of the initiative, stated that he would not move the initiative forward because of lack of support.[2]

Opposition

The following is information obtained from the opposing side of the initiative:

  • According to Virginia Valentine, president of the Nevada Resort Association, in an e-mail: "This initiative represents a 33 percent tax increase on the gaming industry, which would be reckless and irresponsible. We are currently reviewing the language. If this effort is indeed legitimate, we will oppose it vigorously."[1]

Lawsuit

See also: List of ballot measure lawsuits in 2012

Nevada Resort Association v. Nevadans For 9% Gambling Revenue Tax, Inc.

The Nevada Resort Association filed a lawsuit on February 29, 2012 in order to block the initiative petition. The lawsuit was filed in Carson City District Court, stating that the petition was misleading to voters. Specifically, reports stated that the group asked Judge Todd Russell to stop initiative organizers from collecting signatures.[3]

On April 12, 2012, Russell threw out the petition, stating that language used by supporters didn't properly explain the impacts of the measure if enacted. Supporters had the option to refile the measure with the Nevada Secretary of State's office.[4]

See also

References