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Difference between revisions of "Nevada FOIA procedures"

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:: ''See also: [[List of who can make public record requests by state]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[List of who can make public record requests by state]]''
  
Anyone may request public records in [[Nevada]]. "A person may request a copy of a public record".<ref>[http://www.leg.state.nv.us/nrs/NRS-239.html#NRS239Sec010 Nevada Revised Statutes 239.010]</ref>
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Anyone may request public records in [[Nevada]]. "A person may request a copy of a public record."<ref>[http://www.leg.state.nv.us/nrs/NRS-239.html#NRS239Sec010 Nevada Revised Statutes 239.010]</ref>
  
 
==Fees==
 
==Fees==

Latest revision as of 08:02, 25 March 2014

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Each state varies slightly in the procedures used to gain access to public documents. This article serves to describe specifically the steps used in Nevada. To read the history and details of Nevada’s sunshine laws please see Nevada Open Records Act

How to request public records in Nevada

Records requests should be directed to the agency in control of the public records.

Purpose and use

The law does not require a statement of purpose and does not place any restrictions on the use of public records.

Who may request public records?

See also: List of who can make public record requests by state

Anyone may request public records in Nevada. "A person may request a copy of a public record."[1]

Fees

See also: How much do public records cost?

Nevada law allows the charging of fees not to exceed the actual cost of producing the record but does not elaborate on what factors are a part of that fee. In general, fees that go beyond the cost of mere duplication ar erecorded by statute, implying that departments should not charge fees for labor involved in search and duplication unless otherwise required by statute. However, in cases of "extraordinary use of personnel" additional fees may be charged.[2] All fees must be posted in a conspicuous place in all governmental offices.[3] An additional fee is charged for the transcripts of court reports and is remitted to the court reporter.[4] Additional fees are also charged for information from any "geographic information system" that are meant to offset the cost of maintaining and supporting the system.[5] The Department of Veterans' Affairs is exempt from any fees.[6]

Response time

See also: Request response times by state

See also

External links

References